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44

Yes. Taste is really smell, and different glasses can capture aromas differently. Furthermore, different aromas may be more or less present dependent upon temperature, and a glass may be crafted to be held a particular way (gathering more or less heat from your hand). The same is true for wine glasses. That said, how much of a difference it makes to you ...


25

The pH of beer is low enough that no known pathogens can survive in it. That's why you never hear about botulism problems with home-brewed beer like you do with home-canned foods, for example. Beer slowly changes over time. High gravity beers, like barley wines or imperial stouts benefit from this, and acquire richer flavors as they slowly oxydize. Belgian ...


23

There are strains of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (brewer's yeast) such as WLP099 - Super High Gravity Ale Yeast that reportedly can tolerate up to 25% alcohol by volume. The world's strongest beer is Snake Venom coming in at a colossal 67.5% abv. Sources cite it as freeze-distilled, where the beer is frozen and the ice (pure water) is drawn off, leaving a ...


21

Historically beer was almost definitely still (flat) for thousands of years. Before the discovery/invention of force carbonation methods, all beer was carbonated naturally via bottle or cask conditioning. But people were brewing alcoholic beverages commonly referred to as beer in antiquity, and evidence from these cultures (ancient China, Neolithic culture, ...


20

In general, nitrogenation imparts a creamier, smoother texture to a beer. The bubbles are smaller in size than CO2 bubbles, and the reduced solubility results in a thicker beverage, which is both delicious, and results in that visually appealing 'cascade' effect. Also, you can do this with a Nitro beer. And that's awesome.


17

To my knowledge, the answer is always no. To fully experience the flavor of beer, one must swallow it. This is because, unlike the vast majority of wine, beer is carbonated (albeit to varying degrees). When you swallow beer, some of the carbonation escapes the liquid as gas, and actually rises up from your throat into your nose (or, at least, into your ...


16

Beck's is a pale German pilsner brewed by Beck's Brewery headquartered in Bremen. The actual beer you drank was likely brewed in St. Louis, however, as Beck's is wholly owned by AB InBev. Pale Lagers as a style are usually straw colored, up to a light gold with a white head. The flavor is very light and dry with only slight malty sweetness. A little ...


15

From the figures you posted, OG - "Original Gravity". When measured with a hydrometer, it measures the density relative to water. E.g. 1.010 is 1% heavier than water. The units here are degrees Plato (°P), which describe the amount of dissolved sugars. Here, 15 means 15% dissolved sugar. This means the beer (or more correctly, the wort) contained 15% ...


14

There has been a bit of a battle recently, with Brewdog and Schorschbräu constantly topping each other's efforts: BrewDog Blog. Currently it's a Schorschbräu Schorschbock 57% finis coronat opus, which comes in at 57.7%, beating Brewdog's latest effort: Schorschbräu Schorschbock 57% finis coronat opus. I'd say the strongest commercially viable option (these ...


13

Beer Advocate's Guide is a decent one. The abridged version is: Look at the beer. How's the color and head? Swirl it a little bit to pull out the aroma Smell it. Swirl again if need be. I recommend taking a 20 second break after smelling, then smelling again, since if you smell too long, your nose gets used to it and it becomes harder to pick up the ...


13

Most of beer is water, so it is vitally important. Here in Atlanta, we have some of the better tap water compared to many cities, but Monday Night Brewing in particular takes all minerals and chemicals out of the water and adds back in the appropriate properties to match the style of beer that they are trying to brew. They emulate the water from the origin ...


12

If your dishwasher uses a rinsing/drying agent (Finish/Jet Dry type product), these products contain surfactants, which serve to reduce surface tension and "flatten" the water molecules for faster drying. I would imagine that any residual surfactants on the glass reduce the surface tension of the carbon dioxide bubbles and cause them to pop, reducing the ...


12

Quite the opposite, bottle conditioned beer is perfect for aging. The yeast carbonates the beer and will produce slight changes over time, like upping the ABV. This needs to be done in climate controlled environments similar to wine. The yeast will settle to bottom and you want to avoid pouring this into your glass when finished. I brewed a Imperial honey ...


10

Not have any experiense on Beer testing but here are few tips from beer.about.com Do not taste new beers with food or soon after eating. The lingering flavors from food can greatly affect your impression of the brew. Cleanse your palate with water. Crackers or cheese are fine but you should remember that even these foods can affect the apparent flavors of ...


10

Not generally. The aftertaste of beer is more important than it is in wine, and much of the aftertaste comes from swallowing. Also, beer isn't generally as alcoholic as wine, so the risk of getting drunk on a taste is lower. Although some beers can be in the 10-12% range, the average abv is much lower. Further, although the idea of a tongue map has been ...


10

First, to clear up the myth. European beer is not served warm. Some beers, such as real ale (or cask ale) are served at cellar temperature, which while certainly above the temperature of a beer fresh out a refrigerator, at 12-14 degrees celsius (53-57F) is still much colder than room temperature. To answer your question: Mulled beer is heated beer. ...


9

Serving temperature is, of course, a preference. Serve it frozen or boiling if you want. However, a few opinions are: CAMRA says that Real Ale (aka cask ale, usually english-style) should be served at 12-14 °C (54-57 °F), which is colder than room temperature, but warmer than your usually keg beer. Ratebeer says the same thing regardless of whether it’s ...


9

I expect a high alcohol beer, with a lot of complex flavors. One that the alcohol content will "sneak" up on you because it isn't very obvious in the taste. Quoting from the Beer Judge Criteria: Aroma: Complex with moderate to significant spiciness, moderate fruity esters and low alcohol and hop aromas. Generous spicy, peppery, sometimes clove-...


9

I would suggest the app Untapped. It gives you an opportunity to comment on beers and include pictures and locations. You can even earn badges that notate various "beer achievements."


9

First, a disclaimer: I'm American and most of my knowledge of craft beer comes from the American beer scene. I am somewhat aware of the evolution of the UK brewing industry, but nowhere near as knowledgeable as I am about America's. Now, definitions. Craft Beer commonly derives the Brewer's Association definition of a Craft Brewer. Which is Small, ...


9

Oh... something I am a real expert at! You are mixing your context when calling vines hybrids. There are three ways you can grow grapes for fruit. 100% original "own rooted" vines, grafted vines and hybridized vines. Let's back up so I can explain why that is. Many Americans in the 1600-1800s tried unsuccessfully to bring European vines to North America ...


8

Water is extremely important. When touring Brooklyn Brewery, the brewers went on and on about how great it is for them to have access to the NYC water supply. During brewing, the quality of the water is important because the minerals can affect a beer recipe greatly.


8

Flights! I didn't know much about beers until I moved to San Diego, where I was introduced to beer flights:                  Somehow, I'd never heard of or seen them! A flight is 4 or 5 small servings of beer, typically in 4.5- to 5-oz. glasses, usually served on a "paddle." ...


8

In addition to Waitkus his answer I would like to note that the perfect time to drink a beer depends on the type, brand and most importantly taste. There is also a difference when storing larger bottles. For instance a 75 cl Duvel bottle (or larger) can be stored easily for several years, whereas the smaller bottles of the same beer don't fair too well. ...


7

I would argue that even having the IBUs on the bottle you still don't really know what you're going to get. The bitterness of the beer isn't just down to the quantity of alpha acids, which is what the IBUs measure. The bitterness is offset by any residual sweetness in the beer. A brewer can brew two different beers with the same IBUs, and them taste ...


7

More than a millenia ago, there were few standardized recipies for herbs to add during the beer brewing process. "Gruit" referred to the herbal mixtures used to flavor and preserve beer. Gruit was usually sold under papal license exclusive to certain areas at various monasteries and therefore represented a monopoly in Christian areas of the Catholic Church....


7

I would like to point out that taste is not the only important criterion when drinking beer. What you want is a good experience, and the taste is only a part (albeit a major part) of that. Having different glasses for different types of beers can affect your drinking experience in a number of different ways. First off, having an unusual or unique glass can ...


7

It won't be harmful, but neither will it taste any good. Pale low-alcohol beers don't age very well, and a beer that was low on flavour to start with is not going to improve with time. You'll get lots of wet cardboard flavours and a very thin body. I would pour it out.


7

The likely answer is somewhere between carbonation pressure and marketing. It's hard to find numbers for how much caps can handle vs corks but you should notice that most corked beers also come in bottles with very thick glass, this is because the beer inside is at a higher pressure than most other styles. Most beer styles will fall pretty close to 2.0 ...


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