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16

Ok, so the basic brewing process is this (not homebrewing detail here, just a distant overview): Heat your wort with water, steep, then add hops and boil, add more hops as you begin to cool, once cool enough add yeast, ferment, bottle. Flavored beers can be made a bunch of different ways. You can add herbs, spices, or flavorings before or after the boil, ...


11

To add a bit of detail to the existing answers, the primary method for adding a smoked flavor to beer is by using malts that have been dried over a smoky fire, rather than in a kiln which allows the malt to absorb compounds from the smoke that they then release into the beer during brewing. Some of the oldest smoked beers still produced are German (...


11

I recently had their "Crime" and loved it. Here are some other beers brewed with Jalapenos, but not a whole lot from major breweries like Stone. Rogue - Chipotle Ale "smoked jalapeno peppers" Twisted Pine - Ghost Face Killah "serrano, jalapeno, habanero, fresno, anaheim" (notoriously hot) Alaskan - Jalapeno Imperial IPA Horseheads - Hot-Jala-Heim "...


10

I would recommend starting with a draft Hefeweizen or Belgian Wheat, or a fruit flavored mead such as a blackberry or passion-fruit mead. I would also recommend pairing the beer with a good meal so the experience is not centered around the beer, the beer is instead an accent to the experience.


9

Peated malt can provide a beer with subtle smokiness. Peated malt is malt that has been smoked over peat (decaying vegetation). This is common in Scotch & Whisky Ales. Cheers


9

First, a disclaimer: I'm American and most of my knowledge of craft beer comes from the American beer scene. I am somewhat aware of the evolution of the UK brewing industry, but nowhere near as knowledgeable as I am about America's. Now, definitions. Craft Beer commonly derives the Brewer's Association definition of a Craft Brewer. Which is Small, ...


8

The term "cider" is generally reserved for apples. There are 'pear ciders' such as Woodchuck that use the name, but as Wikipedia points out, "A similar product made from pears is called perry but sometimes (incorrectly) called Pear Cider in the marketing of some producers' products". I personally can forgive this, since pears are closely related to apples, ...


7

This largely depends on the person's tastes, but in general one that tastes good. In my experience, most men I know are already beer drinkers, and most women I know have only been exposed to beer in the form of generics like Canadian, Bud, Coors Light.. etc (no introduction to beer at all, and likely a big reason why they don't like it). The predominant ...


7

If used the the brewing process, the nicotine in the tobacco leaves would be extracted into the beer. Too high a nicotine dose in the beer would be poisonous. The whole process would probably be more effort than it is worth. As for tobacco flavor, it depends on the flavors that you enjoy in tobacco. Just like some smokey whiskeys work well with cigars, ...


7

This is not a jalapeno beer, but along the same lines. Ballast Pointe brewery out of San Diego, CA makes what they call a Habanero Sculpin IPA. It is delicious and you can find it all the way over here on the east coast in NC. It has a very nice kick to it- it's great with a steak or something kind of heavy, but not so great for beer pong as the habanero ...


6

You can look for breweries in your areas that give tours. These often include free tastings. (Since you mentioned you're from the Chicago area, I know there's a bus tour that takes you to different breweries in Chicago and Milwaukee. There's a fee, but you'd get to try a lot of different beers.) Also, look for brewpubs and restaurants in your area that sell ...


6

The Rogue Voodoo Doughnut Maple Bacon Ale is an interesting example because the ingredients list shows two different ways flavors can be imparted to beer. The smoky bacon flavor comes both from the actual inclusion of bacon and from the smoked malt: Briess Cherrywood Smoked Malt, Weyermann Beechwood Smoked Malt, House-smoked Hickory Malt. As discussed in ...


6

International bittering units (IBU) measure the bitterness of different beer styles. IPAs have a wide range, and they're typically higher on the scale. If you can find the IBU of a beer you want to try (on Untappd, on the bottle, or some bars make this information available), you can compare it to other beers that you like to determine if it might be too ...


6

If you are trying to get a person who does not like beer to try beer, you are going to have to be creative and go for something a little more exotic. Young's Double Chocolate Stout or Rogue's Chocolate Stout would be my first two choices. My partner dislikes American beer, but really likes these two brands. In addition to Chocolate Stout, Rogue also has ...


6

There are many Jalapeno beers out there. Here is a list of the top 50 rated beers brewed with jalapeno (source): Arizona Wilderness American Presidential Stout Indeed / Northbound Hot Box Imperial Smoked Pepper Porter Stone Smoked Porter - Chipotle Peppers Two Henrys Roasted Jalapeño Blueberry Porter Fate (AZ) Chocolate Chili Milk Stout - Jalapeño Trois ...


6

There is a whole class of drinks called Shrubs Shrubs usually involve a base syrup made from vinegar and fruits and spices and then mixed with a spirit. Shrub syrups are available online in a variety of flavors and there are plenty of recipes out there too for creating your own Shrubs at home. My experience with and what I would define as a example ...


6

You want a mildly flavored, low hop beer for something like this. I would suggest a Kolsch or Helles Lager or a Mild. Pilsners can be heavily hopped. I have done a lot of this with wines when I taught winemaking classes at a community college near here. We used very low aroma wines like a warm climate sauvignon blanc. You want the same for this since you don'...


5

It is certainly possible to make a smoked beer by using a smoked malt at the brewing stage. Excellent information here: Brewing Smoked Beers: Tips from the Pros.


5

The alcohol in beer is created as a byproduct of the yeast consuming the sugar in wort during the fermentation process. For a beer to taste sweet, there are two possibilities: The yeast died before the fermentation process ran to completion. There are various chemicals that can do this. The wort contained some non-fermentable sugars. If the yeast can't ...


5

When I try to pick beers for friends that don't tend to like "regular beer" in general, there are a few different styles I focus on. It's worth mentioning up front that there are certain taste aversions that people have to different beers. You mentioned getting her into a vanilla porter. I have a favorite from Mill Street in Canada; they make a great ...


5

Some brewers design glasses to enhance the experience of the beer in various ways. IPAs in general benefit from a large opening to release as much aroma as possible, but there are other benefits. I know Guinness in particular has designed a very special glass for their beer. The special glass features their golden harp, which you are supposed to aim for ...


5

There are several beers with honey, some of them are quite famous. For example the ones I know are from Belgium and France: "Barbãr" and "Barbãr Bok" from the Levebvre brewery "Bière des ours" from the brewery "La Binchoise" "Bière de miel biologique" from the Dupont brewery "Véliocasse" from the brewery "La bière du Vexin" The easiest to find are ...


5

Do such beers exist elsewhere, in particular, in bottled versions? Yes. American craft brewers use honey and cinnamon quite a bit, though not necessarily at the same time. Here are a few that might be available to you, but as is the case with a perishable product, your mileage may vary. Honey Dogfish Head Midas Touch is brewed with honey, barley malt, ...


5

Beers (ales and lagers) are broken down into many, many different styles based on how they are brewed. Most beers have only 3 or 4 different types of ingredients. Malt, water, yeast, hops and sometimes fruit or herbs. While there doesn't seem like there can be a lot of variation, there are almost an infinite amount of ways to combine these ingredients. For ...


4

The price and quality (or lack thereof) of the beer doesn't particularly come into play in whether it is sweet or not but rather how much residual sugar is left. All beer has sugar in some form, as fermentable sugars are is what the yeast eat to turn into alcohol. No sugar, no alcohol. No alcohol, no beer. The sugar in beer primarily comes from malted ...


4

I feel like this is a pretty opinion based question, especially with IPAs being so "in" right now. Ignoring the taste of hoppiness, which is different from bitterness (dear Bob that myth needs to die), there's a limit to how much bitterness we humans can actually perceive. Past about 100 IBUs the tongue straight up can't tell that there are any more. Now ...


4

Any time you mix things into beer you'll lose some carbonation. Any powder would nucleate bubbles very quickly, so the flavoring should be in liquid form. The liquid should be as similar to beer possible: cold, equally carbonated, and not too much alcohol if it can be avoided. Stir gently in a cold glass and serve right away. Or, if you are brewing the beer ...


4

Beers that are high in ABV, have been bottle-conditioned or have been barrel-aged are prime for aging and cellaring. Usually the brewer will say on the bottle or their website what the max amount of suggested aging time is. For instance, Goose Island Bourbon County Brand Stout state "develops over 5 years in the bottle." I bought a case of 2012 and have one ...


4

There is a variant of stout available in the UK known as Sweet Stout. There is a version made by Sam Smith of Tadcaster in England who export to the US as Samuel Smiths Organic Chocolate Stout. The beer actually has organic cocao mixed in the brew. It may well suit the tastes of someone moving into beer.


4

Gin is very simply defined as a clear alcoholic spirit distilled from grain or malt and flavoured with juniper berries. So your differentiation between "made properly" and "just alcohol and flavor" is meaningless. Many of the finest gins are made by steeping juniper berries and other botanicals in the distilled spirit. Others are created by passing the ...


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