Hot answers tagged

30

Beer was commonly drunk in the middle ages (and renaissance), but what they drank is different from the beer we're used to today. Beer and ale, being grain-based, were important dietary staples -- it's said that beer is liquid bread, and that's not far off. For the common man (not nobility), in particular, grain made up a substantial part of the diet, with ...


28

No, drinking warm beer will not prevent the common cold. There was at least one study conducted revealing that humulone, an chemical found in hops, could help to fight a cold. This study seems to be both biased and exaggerated, as it was conducted by a beer company and the concentration in beer is so low that getting a therapeutic dose would create more ...


18

Most beer has a lot of calories. Just like any other calorie intake, if you consume more than you burn, you will gain weight. So, yes, drinking "too much" beer will "increase the size of belly". What "too much" means, however, is dependent on your other habits. The typical "(beer | pot) (belly | gut)" is usually "Abdominal Obesity" which, by definition, ...


17

Adding any particulate to a beer will reduce the carbonation due to more nucleation sites and the flavor may change from the tobacco ash, but the only way to increase the alcohol content of a beer in your glass is to add alcohol.


13

tl;dr—We don't know (via science, at least). Letting alone ethanol, which triggers innumerable biochemical pathways in our bodies, hops itself may affect potency and sexual desire, in males at least, but there appears to be few clinical studies supporting this claim directly. Many articles online appear to have chained together several studies (or played ...


12

According to this research paper published in BMJ they concluded the following: Results from observational studies, where alcohol consumption can be linked directly to an individual's risk of coronary heart disease, provide strong evidence that all alcoholic drinks are linked with lower risk. Thus, a substantial portion of the benefit is from ...


12

Beer can make you gain weight by three means, but you shall NOT pursue it ! First is alcohol, which is a byproduct of the fermentation of starch by yeast. Starch is a carbohydrate, and it has it's own nutriting quality, including energy. Its energy is transferred to alcohol. If the energy it carries is not used by basal metabolism or physical activity, it'...


11

Just like wine, absolutely! I'm not a doctor and I am not giving medical advice; I am not liable whatsoever for your drunken antics. With that said, in addition to kidney benefits: Beer contains high amounts of silicon, which makes bones stronger In moderation, it has been shown to lower the risk of cardiovascular problems. However, when abused, ...


10

The answer is complex, to be honest. In the Middle Ages? Where? When? These are important questions. Lumping around a thousand years and very different cultural eras (ranging from the Vendell-era Norse to the Byzantine Empire) into the same label is problematic at the very least. The answer I think to the question as stated has to be "no" insofar as ...


10

Beer is a taste preference, and therefor the chances exist that you may "learn" to like beer. As a child I tasted the pale mass-produced lager that my father drank and I did not like it. But children (usually) prefer sweet over bitter. As we grow older, our taste change and we learn to enjoy a more varied amount of flavours, including bitterness, and we ...


8

QI provides the answer: with a few exceptions (where it will make you vomit) it is perfectly safe to drink alcohol whilst taking antibiotics. Apart from some special circumstances, it is on the whole OK to drink while on antibiotics. The reason why people think that you should not is that when antibiotics was first being used it was to cure syphilis. The ...


7

I do this about once a month and can confirm that it's more than safe, it's delicious. In fact during the 19th century half of London lived on porter and oysters! I'd recommend oyster stouts, London porters or champagne with them. Stouts and porters are particularly traditional in London


7

If you are using honey, water and yeast. Then the answer is NO. But alcohol is a poisonous substance if not used properly. You cannot make it strong enough to "poison" you in the traditional sense. Could you poison yourself by drinking too much of it, sure it's possible. But, there are no by-products from the fermentation process that would "poison" you. ...


7

Due its high alcohol content, you will still be able to drink the sake without worrying about your health. However, the recommended consumption period is usually one year after bottling. After that, the maker cannot guarantee the flavor of the sake. Whatever the flavor of your sake is right now, whether it aged well or went plain ugly, is not the flavor of ...


6

I do not know much but I know there is a published book about that. Beer in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance by Richard W. Unger. Some lines from the excerpt of the book: Modern beer, however, has little in common with the drink that carried that name through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Looking at a time when beer was often a nutritional ...


6

Beer apparently not only lowers the risk of kidney stones, but also helps dissolve and pass existing kidney stones (additionally by dilating the ureters—the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder). Beer consumption was inversely associated with risk of kidney stones; each bottle of beer consumed per day was estimated to reduce risk by 40% [...] ...


6

The chances of corn being grown for industrial purposes, like making dextrose have a very high probability of being GMO. If you are buying specialty grains (like for steeping), the probability of those ingredients being genetically modified are much lower. That said, finding out whether or not your adjunct is made from GMO corn (or rice) is very difficult. ...


6

It depends... I don't see an issue with the standard Tums or Rolaids but there might be issues with ranitidine according to some studies. http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/news/20000215/zantac-alcohol-dont-mix "The effect was striking," says author Charles Lieber, MD. In a three-hour test period, conducted under conditions similar to social ...


6

None, the hops are added to provide a bitter flavour and because they have an antibiotic property that favours yeast over other microorganisms. The hops are filtered out in the brewing process so there is no calorific gain. In a typical UK beer recipe the hops are typically 1% of the dry ingredients.


6

I'm no expert but i'll give it a shot: Jägermeister and other herbal liqueurs do contain herbal essences that probably have some effect on your body. But not in any medicinal quality, otherwise it couldn't be sold as food in the EU by law. There are strict rules (e.g. Directive 2001/83/EC). In general the usefulness of digestifs for the digestion is ...


6

The answer to this question is going to differ from person to person, since gout sufferers react differently to both diet and alcohol. For some individuals alcohol increases pain in gout sufferers, while in others it decreases their pain. One has to know how to micro-manage their personal diets and alcohol consumption. For those who want to micro-manage ...


6

I had never heard of this saying (I'm not a native English speaker), but the funny thing is that in Dutch there is a similar saying, except with wine instead of liquor and the other way around: 'wijn na bier is plezier, bier na wijn is venijn'. This roughly translates to 'wine after beer is fun, beer after wine is poison'. I once read an interview with a ...


5

No. An adjunct is simply an ingredient that is not strictly necessary to brew the beer. In some cases the purpose of the adjunct is to reduce costs, while in others it is to achieve certain flavours (e.g. in honey beers, or various spiced beers). If cost is the primary concern, then GMO ingredients may be picked if they are cheapest. When adjuncts are ...


5

tl;dr—Yes, but only at safe levels. Formaldehyde was detected in beer, at safe levels, as far back as 1983: A simple procedure was developed for the determination of formaldehyde in samples of beer and soft drinks. [...] Levels of formaldehyde found were in the low mg/kg range. Detection limits were less than 0.1 mg/kg of sample. Lawrence, J. F. and ...


5

As everything in life, it depends.... From the Mayo Clinic: Antibiotics and alcohol can cause similar side effects, such as stomach upset, dizziness and drowsiness. Combining antibiotics and alcohol can increase these side effects. A few antibiotics — such as metronidazole (Flagyl), tinidazole (Tindamax) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (...


5

Before application, consider the steps you have taken to have gotten to that point, then do whatever you can to ensure you never repeat those steps again.


5

Alcohol free beer is not non-alcoholic, it does still contain some alcohol. It often contains around about 0,5%. A beer can be called alcohol-free from 1%. To specifically respond to your situation I could not find any source saying that the Netherlands have an age restriction on alcohol-free beer. On the contrary the following sources indicate the opposite....


4

Use Formaldehyde can be used as a cheap clarification agent (making the beer clear; irish moss is a safe additive used for the same purpose). However, as it's a known carcinogen, it should be used very minimally. Prevalence TLDR: It's not widely used, and its use is in decline. Here's a reasonably well-sourced article on it. It was hard to find any ...


4

Plastic food packaging in general is usually lined with Bisphenol A (aka. BPA), as are some canned goods, which is a rather controversial chemical. It's been linked to cancer, sexual dysfunction, and other ailments. So I try to avoid it whenever possible and buy my food in glass jars. I can only imagine how much BPA is dissolved into alcoholic beverages ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible