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9

Drink it neat but chilled. the author of the Wikipedia entry seems to agrees with this statement too. Limoncello is traditionally served chilled as an after-dinner digestiv I would recommend it chilled in a chilled shot glass. It’s an aperitif/digestiv so you wouldn’t want to fill up on it...Separately you are quite right though, it is a nice cocktail ...


7

I suppose this is obvious, but how about the Banana Daiquiri.


7

You cannot substitute green for yellow Chartreuse without changing the basic character of the cocktail. Both varieties are very strong flavors, but different characters. As the Chartreuse is nearly 25% of the ingredients you can't hide the difference. If you make a Green Jacket instead of a Yellow Jacket you'll end up with something more vegetable tasting ...


7

This is how limoncello is served in the province of Salerno (where it mainly comes from): Very cold shot glasses (they're not opaque, it's rime on them). But I'd rather drink it in a cocktail, it's just tooo sweet for my taste.


7

I was surprised at how tough it was to track down anything that clearly mentioned both. Firstly, from several recipes, including this one, it seems that simple syrup is made, as you might expect, by dissolving sugar into an equal amount of water and then cooling. When it comes to invert sugar, recipes seem to call for more sugar and possibly an acid, be it ...


7

Old advertisements show that it was made starting in 1900 in Portland, Maine. It consisted of a syrup made of pineapple, orange, lemon, raspberry, and strawberry juices with sugar, red food coloring, and sodium benzoate as a preservative. Unfortunately, I can't find anywhere what the ratios are, but I'd start by doing equal parts of juice in a 1:1 ratio with ...


6

Martini the brand is an Italian vermouth made by Martini & Rossi. Traditionally, martini the drink is a concoction made with gin and vermouth, and a strong (but unproven) theory as to its etymology is that martini the drink was originally named after Martini the brand.


6

There is a whole class of drinks called Shrubs Shrubs usually involve a base syrup made from vinegar and fruits and spices and then mixed with a spirit. Shrub syrups are available online in a variety of flavors and there are plenty of recipes out there too for creating your own Shrubs at home. My experience with and what I would define as a example ...


6

Tabasco or other hot sauces will be a far more common spicy ingredient, and is present in quite a number of cocktails (the Bloody Mary variants, Afterburners*, Flatliners). You could even use a vinegar-based hot sauce as the "dirty" part of a dirty martini. Here are more ideas that I haven't tried myself. Note that unless the wasabi root was grated in front ...


6

What cocktails are named, created, or in some other sense may be used by Catholics to celebrate their liturgical year? St. Basil (January 1st, 2nd and 30th) And now for some innovations in the world of liturgical mixology. We created the Great Basil in honor of St. Basil the Great, a fourth-century Greek Father and Doctor of the Church. Ingredients for ...


5

Bananas can go in any blended tropical drink fairly well. Any strawberry drink (daiquiri or margarita) can have bananas added. For obvious reasons though bananas would go better in a frozen drink than a "on the rocks" drink. You can also peel bananas and freeze them and they will stay fine for a couple of months. The flesh will darken but they are ...


5

How can I layer liquors on top of each other? The key to creating perfectly layered drinks is to pay attention to how heavy each ingredient is compared to the other ingredients. The weight of each liquid is measured by its specific gravity. An alcohol density chart can be viewed here. There are a few simple rules to follow: You want to use a ...


4

My favorite French cheese is Roquefort and is often served with nuts and honey in France. I would like to recommend an Appletini with Roquefort along with the most authentic French bread you are able to procure in your area. The French love their fruit and fruit flavored food and drinks. Appletini cocktail: Vodka with dashes apple juice and apple liqueur. ...


4

+1 for the Fabbri Amarena suggestion. Another alternative is brandy (or other spirit) soaked cherries, they are relatively easy to make which allows you to control what kind of spirits, how much sugar, what kind of cherries, etc. If you not willing/able to make them, they are also available from retailers, eg Amazon


4

There is the Amarena cherry was developed by Gennaro Fabbri and is a particular bitter cherry. Fabbri mixes them with a sort of jam and makes syrups with them. The sensation is like the maraschino cherry, but more soft, enveloping and a bit less of sugar in it... I found it perfect in all iced tea cocktail, to give them a twist, also good with pretty ...


4

I do love a wine spritzer and cocktails, as you can take a fabulous wine, white or red, add splashes of other liquid(s) for a light and refreshing drink. I also love your questions, and would like to be your neighbor, invited over for drinks (I'll bring the hors d'oeuvres). So, for your glorious rose-colored beverages, along with rosy images! Tinto de ...


4

Are there any spirits that never should be combined in a cocktail or drink? The short answer is no. But that said, there are some spirits that some might want to think twice about since they have an overpowering taste. On the top of my list would be absinthe and chartreuse (especially the green). Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but ...


3

Egg whites are used in wine and other beverages to precipitate the solids. I'm not sure how this would be done for a bloody mary, but in wine you basically whip up some egg whites until foamy then put them in the wine barrel and let setting for for several weeks. Most of the action takes place right away. You can also use Gelatin for the same purpose. I use ...


3

The sweetness is a little much for me on its own but I find it very refreshing, So I tend to enjoy it as a frappe. Simply equal parts ice and Limoncello and run it through “crushed ice” setting in the blender for a mintute or two. Brilliant summer time drink!


3

According to a USDA report, a study done in 2000 showed that of the estimated 47 billion eggs consumed in the U.S. annually, 2.3 million of them were estimated to be contaminated by salmonella, leading to approximately 240,000 illnesses. So, if my math is correct, for any given egg, you have something like a 1 in 100,000 chance of getting one that has ...


3

Does this count? 12-Layer Pousse Café grenadine creme de cassis green creme de menthe maraschino liqueur elderflower liqueur orange curacao benedictine yellow chartreuse green chartreuse fernet branca cognac over-proof rum MxMo: Pousse Café Here is a seven-layered Pousse Café: INGREDIENTS: 1/4 shot ...


3

The most layers I have seen (and drunk) is the Pousse Cafe No. 1 - with 6 layers. It has equal measures of 6 liqueurs and spirits: Grenadine Maraschino Creme De Menthe Creme De Violette Yellow Chartreuse Brandy Pouring uses the usual layer process - pour down the back of a spoon...very gently, so you don't mix with the previous layer. Pic from epicurious....


3

Since you mention sheep cheese and dark fruit, I'll address that type of pairing. You want a cocktail that reflects the item you pair with the cheese. Start with the Luxardo cherry in a Manhattan (epicurious on Luxardo cherries). Then, think about sweetening up the otherwise stiff-but-smooth Manhattan to better complement the cheese. For example, replace ...


3

Please allow me to make a second recommendation for you. This one I have not tried, but I have had the Soup au Vin with strawberries and it was absolutely great. For a twist on this blackberry wine might also go well with it (real natural blackberry wine and not the blackberry flavored ones). Simply pair your favorite champagne with a piece of flavorful ...


3

Well, I had a sip of it out of curiosity, and it tasted great, so I finished off what was left. No ill health effects to report so it would appear it was fine! I will say that the fruit looked slightly worse for wear so I didn't eat any of it, but otherwise the drink was delicious.


3

Grain alcohol (brandy, triple sec, peach schnapps) does not spoil while it's sitting in your liquor cabinet. A bottle of wine, even with the oxidation after it's opened, can be drank for more or less 36 hours after opening (eventually it becomes vinegar). The fruit would take time to decay, much longer than 24 hours. Next time, eat the fruit.


2

Manhattan with Brie. Dirty Martini with Brie. sounds delish.


2

I like it as a digestive, refreshed around a few °C above 0. However, making some ice cubes in a freezer (nice to have a few of these special plastic bags in the freezer, each filled with a different liquor in fact), and after having crush a cube (e.g. with a mortar and pestle), adding that "slush" on top of an adequate cocktail (fruity one for instance) ...


2

Yes, it's been proven scientifically! Here is an article that breaks it down On the other hand, some research suggests that, under the right conditions, loud noise might actually enhance certain flavors Are these people on vacation? It's a well known fact that things taste better on vacation. Why wine tastes better on vacation Reason 1: The answer ...


2

The use of brown sugar in Europe must give the cachaça a taste of sugarcane. Industrially produced cachaça often doesn't have it. The problem is that brown sugar can be made of beta and it doesn't have taste of sigarcane either. And it dissolves slower than white sugar so the drink becomes sweet when it's almost finished. Source: German Wikipedia.


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