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26

Most importantly, a good head helps release the aromas of the beer, especially the hops. Aroma is everything for enjoyment of a good brew. When enjoying a super-hoppy IPA, you should always use a glass that provides a large surface area for aromatics to rise from. It can also provide the a pleasant mouth feel. Stouts definitely benefit from a thick, silky ...


25

It depends on the beer really. A good rule of thumb is darker beer should be served at a warmer temperature than lighter beer. For instance if you refrigerate all of your beers and then pull them out of the fridge and drink them instantly you will miss A LOT of the flavor complexity of pretty much every stout and porter you put to your lips. But, if you ...


22

Today they're largely just traditional. However, originally they helped: To keep the beer cool by preventing airflow from above. To keep insects and other contaminants out. To prevent spillage while cheers-ing and generally carousing. See the following article on Stein Lids for more detail.


21

In general, nitrogenation imparts a creamier, smoother texture to a beer. The bubbles are smaller in size than CO2 bubbles, and the reduced solubility results in a thicker beverage, which is both delicious, and results in that visually appealing 'cascade' effect. Also, you can do this with a Nitro beer. And that's awesome.


17

Cask ales are not stored under pressure , and require a pump to transfer the beer from the cask. As the ale is not under pressure, it is also not as heavily carbonated as other beers. In contrast kegged beer is stored under pressure, and is forced to the tap by pumping gas into the keg (usually carbon dioxide or nitrogen).


15

Apart from the simple explanation of people liking the foam, the lack of head could indicate problems with the beer. For example: It could mean that the glass is dirty, or there is left over soap residue on the glass. This can affect the taste of the beer. It could indicate that the beer has lost its carbonation (the head being formed by the gas quickly ...


13

I would say that the condensate amounts to no more than 1ml for a 500ml glass, which is a 0.2% dilution. No to be too coarse, but I imagine most people dilute the beer more after taking a sip! Comparatively, I think the excessively cold temperature will contribute more to destroying the flavor than a small amount of condensate from the glass. So, if ...


9

Like most beers, the main thing is the height of the foam on top of the beer. It's largely a matter of personal preference; the only considerations I'm aware of are: Bottle-fermented beers should be poured slowly and all in one go to prevent yeast from going into the glass (and, to that end, leave half a finger of beer in the bottle). Unless it's an ...


9

You can decant the beer between two large glasses or pitchers - the agitation will cause the CO2 to come out of solution quickly and also not raise the temperature too much. Sample after 4-5 decants to see how much the carbonation has dropped, and repeat as necessary. You will end up with quite a bit of foam, hence the need for larger glasses or a pitcher.


9

I'm from Germany. Don't care too much about this. Just remove that part of it which would be disturbing when drinking, since some minor pieces might get into the glass or into your mouth directly if you are drinking out of the bottle, which is common in Germany, except in a restaurant or during a dinner. Also you wouldn't normally remove the gold paper ...


8

Cask beer is not kept under pressure whereas Keg beer is (with CO2 or a nitrogen mixture). Beers served in Cask vs Keg (w/ CO2) vs Keg (w/ Nitro) will have slightly different tastes and appearances. Cask beer will be a "flatter" due to the lack of pressure keeping the CO2 in solution in the beer. Cask beer can also take on a butterscotch flavor due to the ...


8

For a keg system to pour beer without excessive foam, the system must be balanced, and the serving line/faucet free of obstructions. Serving beer at too high a pressure, or through a half-open faucet/tap agitates the beer, causing the foam you saw. The system is balanced by having the pressure inside the keg set to just a touch more (0.5-1psi) than the ...


8

How long do you leave them in the fridge before you open them? Making sure they've had a good several hours to chill may mitigate the explosion. You could also try a homebrewer's trick, which is to chill them really cold, pop the caps all off then put new caps on. You would need a bottle capper to do this. They're fairly cheap but you probably wouldn't ...


8

Yes, they do. A new experiment done jointly by Stanford University and the University of Edinburgh has finally proven that when beer is poured into a glass, the bubbles sometimes go down. "Bubbles are lighter than beer, so they're supposed to rise upward," – Richard N. Zare, the Professor of Natural Sciences at Stanford. "But countless ...


8

Almost anything can be used to open a bottle of beer. What we used as university students: spoon (fork, knife), key, table, park bank, fence, another bottle of beer. My preferred way (when there's no bottle opener) is to use a spoon (I hold the spoon differently but this way is also worth consideration): Using another (closed) bottle: If you are outside ...


7

The steins with their lids seem to have come about as a result of the bubonic plague to serve as sanitary measure and thus keep flies and other insects (fleas) out of the beer. From about 1340 until 1380, a bubonic plague, or Black Death, killed more than 25 million Europeans! As horrible as this historic event was, it prompted tremendous progress for ...


7

Just wanted to add to some of the already great answers… Although it has been mentioned what the characteristics of Nitro are, and why that might be good for the beer drinking experience, it hasn't really been said why to use it or rather why its used in lieu of CO2. History It was mentioned that the historical carbonation process was very different, ...


7

There are two angles to consider what is best for the beer what is best for the tasting scenario For the beer, a serving size that is appropriate should: provide sufficient beer to not warm up excessively in the cup or glass in the minute or two tasting is underway. This means serving sizes should be at least 60ml/2 oz. (If the beer is served too cold, ...


7

As mentioned by @Fishtoaster (and as depicted in the cat gif) pouring over the back of a spoon is definitely a must - you really want to make sure none of the top layer breaks into the bottom layer. There are a few other ways to make your layering more effective as well. As seen in the animated gif, a curved beer glass is used. Ideally, you want it to have ...


6

Pour it over the back of a spoon As with any layered beer, your goal is to reduce the velocity of the top beer as it hits the bottom beer. So, pour it over the back of a spoon to split the stream up into smaller rivulets (which won't push as far into the lower beer): (original source) For advanced drinkers, bend a spoon handle so that you can lower the ...


6

First, there are currently beers that are served warm, particularly very dark ones. So part of it has to do with the character of beer. There are two important factors I see, looking at this as a history nut but not knowing of any sources on this topic. The first, as you say, is widespread refrigeration. But this was not the major factor in cold ...


6

As a safe bet, dry still red wines should be served between 18-20°C Of course exceptions apply... Opening time prior to service depends on the vintage, older wines (4+ years) need to breathe longer than young wines (0-3 years). Knowing what kind of wine you have would help, denomination and vintage being the most useful information.


5

Some brewers design glasses to enhance the experience of the beer in various ways. IPAs in general benefit from a large opening to release as much aroma as possible, but there are other benefits. I know Guinness in particular has designed a very special glass for their beer. The special glass features their golden harp, which you are supposed to aim for ...


5

This is very broad so I will stick to wine in my answer. There are many considerations for pouring, you have the aesthetic aspects and presentation, and you have the mechanical aspects which can change the properties of the served drink. For wine, the waitress was right from a presentation point of view when served in a fine dining setting. Holding the ...


5

When it comes to what is socially accepted in the US, ice is mostly reserved for the harsher stuff like bourbon and scotch. The ice serves a purpose of diluting the liquor, thus making it smoother on the way down. It serves a purpose for different whiskies that have harsher spice notes. Tequila, vodka, brandy, cognac, and rum should be put in the freezer ...


5

English is not my native language and I am not sure of the meaning of the word freezer. I believe it is the part of the fridge that goes under 0°C. In France, according to my habits, the champagne usually goes in the fridge with the other beverages. We put it in the freezer only when we have unexpected guests and we need to cool the bottle quickly. The ...


4

As stated earlier, temperature is a matter of taste regarding beer. Necessity may also play a part (Given a choice between a warm beer vs no beer it depends how thirsty you are!). German-style lagers are almost exclusively recommended to be served no lower than 6°C (43°F)no higher than 9°C (49°F), but I often find that the last (and warmest) mouthfuls from a ...


4

Tasting Beer by Randy Mosher is by far the most valuable beer book I've ever read. It covers the styles you'll encounter, the flavors, the technology, the history, the science, and more. I was a fairly knowledgeable beer enthusiast when I read it, but I wish I'd read it ten years earlier. If I had, it would have increased my enjoyment of getting to know ...


4

You want to have enough beer so that a person would be able to see the head profile along with getting a good look at the color/clarity of the beer. Along with being able to take 2 - 3 sips of the beer. A tasting would be a larger pour as this would be more of a friendly gathering and you want the people to enjoy the beer, I would aim for 4 - 6 oz. It is ...


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