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Omission isn't too bad. My wife is gluten free and she drinks this from time to time. I've tried it and is better (IMO) then most other GF beers. Omission Beer And from their FAQ In 2013, Mass Spec research was conducted by an independent lab which validated that Omission Lager and Pale Ale are devoid of known barley toxic epitopes, the specific ...


12

I asked a rabbi at the KAA and he said that the ruling was because in NZ ethanol is produced from whey and there was concern about that ethanol being used to fortify beers. However, they have now determined that no major NZ breweries fortify their beer in that way, so they now consider NZ beer to be pareve (neutral, neither dairy nor meat). See more here. ...


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Just to add to this topic, I think it's important that the correct terminology is used since the author asked for "gluten free" beer suggestions. In the beer world, "gluten free" can only be used if the ingredients used to brew the beer do not contain gluten. Sorghum appears to be the most popular ingredient for making GF beers, but there are a number of ...


9

There are a few main things contributing to this 'hype'. Firstly is the addition of the lime. It adds the citric acidity that pairs well with the light beer and gives it a unique zing that you don't find in other easily available beers. Secondly, its a light beer that is easy and pleasurable to drink. It may not have rich notes that some love, or special ...


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You’re absolutely right about the perception. It’s similar in the US for people who buy Steel Reserve and other malt liquors: they’re a cheap means to an end. The reality, though, seems to be that a lot of people like the taste: 'Of course, the most common question I get asked is: 'Isn't it just winos who drink it?' ' admits Katie Rawll, Carlsberg's ...


7

More than a millenia ago, there were few standardized recipies for herbs to add during the beer brewing process. "Gruit" referred to the herbal mixtures used to flavor and preserve beer. Gruit was usually sold under papal license exclusive to certain areas at various monasteries and therefore represented a monopoly in Christian areas of the Catholic Church....


6

I've tried several different Gluten Free beers in the past few years. So far, the only brand that I've tasted that resembles normal beer almost 100%, is Omission Lager and Pale Ale. Their IPA doesn't really do it for me, but it's still the closest Gluten Free IPA I've tasted.


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I got a response from the Samuel Adams Twitter account: We brew around 60 different styles a year - sometimes we have to retire some brews to make room for new ones. So it seems as if this beer is out of production. For good.


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You can look for breweries in your areas that give tours. These often include free tastings. (Since you mentioned you're from the Chicago area, I know there's a bus tour that takes you to different breweries in Chicago and Milwaukee. There's a fee, but you'd get to try a lot of different beers.) Also, look for brewpubs and restaurants in your area that sell ...


6

What it really sounds like you're getting at is that the beer you drink at a brewery is better than the beer you buy off the shelf at a store. I'd believe that. Beer from a brewery's tap is likely incredibly fresh, which most people would agree for most styles is better. Especially with how popular hoppy beers are in the San Diego scene, hops fade quickly....


6

Indeed there are kosher beers All unflavored beer with no additives are considered to be kosher, even without certification. Some of the most popular kosher beer companies include: Many breweries are coming out with specialty brews that have additives; don't assume that all varieties are acceptable - check the label. Coors Saranac all products Pete'...


6

It depends upon what you think a dark beer tastes like because there is a wide range of shades of dark, and a wide range of flavors that come with dark. The amber beers can have tastes of caramel and dark fruits like raisins. Stouts, like a Guinness, will have roasty flavors, and those and porters can have hints of chocolate and coffee. The easiest is ...


6

I had never heard of this saying (I'm not a native English speaker), but the funny thing is that in Dutch there is a similar saying, except with wine instead of liquor and the other way around: 'wijn na bier is plezier, bier na wijn is venijn'. This roughly translates to 'wine after beer is fun, beer after wine is poison'. I once read an interview with a ...


5

This is what would be referred to as the "Light Beer" category. For the most part, this is mass-produced beer, done by the big commercial breweries in the USA (I don't know much about beer production outside North America). If you want some good light beers, I'd suggest taking a look at lists like BeerAdvocate's Best Light Lagers


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I'd say it comes down to three things. Distribution Rights Breweries in most states are restricted by the three-tier system which divides the brewing industry into three categories: Producers Distributors Retailers. A few states allow the producer to engage in self-distribution (usually to a limited degree) but most require that a brewery get ...


5

There are several beers with honey, some of them are quite famous. For example the ones I know are from Belgium and France: "Barbãr" and "Barbãr Bok" from the Levebvre brewery "Bière des ours" from the brewery "La Binchoise" "Bière de miel biologique" from the Dupont brewery "Véliocasse" from the brewery "La bière du Vexin" The easiest to find are ...


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Do such beers exist elsewhere, in particular, in bottled versions? Yes. American craft brewers use honey and cinnamon quite a bit, though not necessarily at the same time. Here are a few that might be available to you, but as is the case with a perishable product, your mileage may vary. Honey Dogfish Head Midas Touch is brewed with honey, barley malt, ...


5

In Brazil, we have a few. But, in general, they're not an original beer, really created by some musician, but more a marketing thing. They only contract a micro brewery to develop a recipe for then, or even use a previously existent beer and re-brand it with their names. Examples are: Raimundos, Sepultura (which is a brazilian hardcore band well-known ...


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Ice beer is brewed using a technique known as fractional freezing, or freeze distillation. It's rooted in the tradition of German Eisbock style, though in an Eisbock the technique is used to considerably concentrate the alcohol (alcohol percentages in the final product can range from 10%, to over 50%) whereas when a modern mild lager-based Ice beer probably ...


5

Corona used to be a cheap Mexican Beer available in the US. When its popularity fell a little bit, the company's marketing wing decided to provide provocative ads and increase the price. Americans bought that (the marketing) and Corona now is a "desired" beer in the US. That's my take based entirely on personal observation and this: http://www.aef.com/...


5

Guinness Draft is an Irish Dry Stout, a session beer, with alcohol by volume at 4.2%. It is intended that you can sit and drink several pints without becoming overly intoxicated. Compare that with Bud Light, which is 4.3%. Guinness has much more flavor than Bud Light, or any other similar American Light Lager beers. If you compare it with Guinness Extra ...


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The same reason people put salt on their food. It enhances the flavor of the beer. The extra salt has other effects as well though, outside of simply making things more salty. Particularly, adding salt to foods helps certain molecules in those foods more easily release into the air, thus helping the aroma of the food, which is important in our ...


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There are definitely Easter-themed beers. Though, no official beer-style when it comes to the holiday, it seems... (Barring all "hoppy" puns) Everything goes; from Pilsner to Porter. The best beers to enjoy with your Easter egg - The Telegraph Top 5 Easter Beers - KegWorks The Easter Beer Festival also showcases ciders and perries; the Spring season seems ...


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Here goes a more traditional way at looking at this question! And yes, I do enjoy Tim Burnett - Bassist's answer very much. To each his own. For those of you who desire more traditional named beers for Easter, here is a small sampling that are available at various places around the globe. Let us start with the Season with these: The Bruery Saison De ...


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There was a similar question on the Cooking SE site. Perhaps you can try the approach suggested by Adam Shiemke in the accepted answer. He recommended using ethyl acetate and performing a little home science experiment as detailed here.


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The province of Québec is very fertile in microbreweries. Montréal being the major city, has lots to offer. A lot of the beers are available throughout the province, however some are only available at the microbrewery itself, especially seasonal beers - a good reason to visit them! here's a list of the best microbreweries and some of their speciality beers: ...


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While there is no current objective assessment of beer other than IBU/abv you can take classes to become a subjective judge of the major traits: nose/head/appearance/taste/finish. Classes are available via a simple google search that will return results like this: http://www.bjcp.org/index.php


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I have not done the 1001 to drink before you die, but I have rated more than 1000 beers on RateBeer. :) I have many favourites, but a favourite depends on so many things! Westvletern 8 is one of the best beers I have ever had, but I would not like to drink it while mowing the lawn! Snow and Bud are great for quenching a thirst, but not something I would ...


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There are several that you might try. The Bruery White Chocolate This bourbon barrel-aged wheatwine-style ale made a fanciful trip to the chocolatier and returned with luscious flavors of white chocolate – hence the name. White Chocolate is a rewarding summons to the senses – beginning with its golden appearance and finishing with warming, white ...


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Is there a real reason for putting salt in beer? Putting salt in beer stems from a few philosophies - all of which seem to have had a purpose at one time or another. · An old wives' tale said that putting a sprinkle of salt in your beer would stave off cramping during hard work. Dehydration can cause cramping of the muscles, because of the depletion ...


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