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15

From the figures you posted, OG - "Original Gravity". When measured with a hydrometer, it measures the density relative to water. E.g. 1.010 is 1% heavier than water. The units here are degrees Plato (°P), which describe the amount of dissolved sugars. Here, 15 means 15% dissolved sugar. This means the beer (or more correctly, the wort) contained 15% ...


15

Doppelbock (or double bock) is intense in its maltiness and higher than "single" bock in terms of alcohol content, typically starting around 6-7% and going up to around 13%. There isn't anything specifically doubled or tripled; rather, doppel idiomatically refers to be being "bigger"/stronger than a standard bock. In terms of how higher "maltiness" is ...


14

It's often a misconception that one comes forth from the other, this is incorrect. The name was used to indicate the strength of the Westmalle beers. Originally there was the Enkel, Dubbel and Tripel. It is said that they represent the holy trinity. Later quadruppels were added. Both Dubbel and Tripel as name were first used by the Trappist brewery of ...


13

This is a broad question, notably regarding the differences between IPAs and Double IPAs, but here's an overview focusing on the naming (and misconceptions thereof) and brewing of variants. Double IPA vs. Imperial IPA (IIPA) First, the Double IPA is also known as an Imperial IPA (IIPA). You can think of the "double" as referring to the two letter I's :-) ...


12

Beers served on nitro have only about 25-40% of the dissolved carbon dioxide compared to regular beers served only on CO2. For stouts, the figure is usually closer to 25% - 40% is for lagers served on nitro. With only 25% of the carbon dioxide, there is less concern of creating too large a foam. Plus the nitrogen causes the foam to be made of very very ...


12

The brewery really needs to indicate how they get the 300 IBU measurement. Most just work it out from the hops they add using hop bitterness calculators, rather than it being an actual measurement of the bittering compounds in the beer. For highly hopped beers, the calculated IBUs can be far off compared to reality - above around 100 IBUs it becomes more and ...


10

First, to clear up the myth. European beer is not served warm. Some beers, such as real ale (or cask ale) are served at cellar temperature, which while certainly above the temperature of a beer fresh out a refrigerator, at 12-14 degrees celsius (53-57F) is still much colder than room temperature. To answer your question: Mulled beer is heated beer. ...


10

The BJCP classifies Corona Extra as a Premium American Lager, being, clear, yellow, not hoppy but with a little more body than a light. Assuming 'dry' isn't some radically different beer, the category would probably still be correct. BJCP draft guidelines (not official) consider putting Asahi Super Dry and Corona Extra in 2A 'International Pale Lagers' ...


9

I expect a high alcohol beer, with a lot of complex flavors. One that the alcohol content will "sneak" up on you because it isn't very obvious in the taste. Quoting from the Beer Judge Criteria: Aroma: Complex with moderate to significant spiciness, moderate fruity esters and low alcohol and hop aromas. Generous spicy, peppery, sometimes clove-...


9

Not only has variety improved, but so has the technology and agronomy of brewing. Malt variety, yield, and efficiency Crop science has increased the size of barley kernels and the amount of starches available to convert to sugar. The common grain at the time was 6-row malt, today the most common brewing barley is 2-row. Understanding of the malting ...


8

I don't think there's a site dedicated to that purpose specifically. However, Untapped and Beermenus are probably your best bets. I've never used Untapped as I do not have a smartphone and I think they've just recently added desktop/laptop support, but I have used Beermenus. It's ok, not great though. Again, it's really up to the brewery/bar to update their ...


8

I'm from Germany. Don't care too much about this. Just remove that part of it which would be disturbing when drinking, since some minor pieces might get into the glass or into your mouth directly if you are drinking out of the bottle, which is common in Germany, except in a restaurant or during a dinner. Also you wouldn't normally remove the gold paper ...


8

There are beer blends served in England and Scotland although it tends to be the older drinkers. Mild and Bitter is one where a half pint of bitter is mixed with a half of mild. Brown and Bitter is half of bitter with a brown ale such as Mann's. A common Scottish blend is the Black and Tan which is Guinness and IPA/Heavy - this can also be made a Sweet ...


7

Yes, they are related. The pilsner beer style got its name from the city of Pilsen, in what is now the Czech Republic, where the beer was first brewed in 1842. Reference: Pilsner


7

I am a big fan of tripels and quadrupels. They are dark, and much smoother, I find, than blondes and other lower-alcohol beers (and yes, tripels are substantially more alcoholic). Contrary to the previous answer, I find they taste less bitter than typical beers, although perhaps it may be because the bitterness is masked by the other flavors perhaps? It ...


7

The BJCP Style Guidelines specify a wide variety of variables. These include: Aroma (malt, hops, yeast, diacetyl, etc) Appearance (color, clarity, head, etc) Flavor (sweetness, bitterness, dryness, alcohol, carbonation acidity, diacetyl, fruitiness, etc) Mouthfeel (body, carbonation, smoothness, astringency, etc.) Ingredients (yeast, mash bill, hops, added ...


7

A bit obvious, but it's just about more malt and hops (which results in higher ABV and IBU levels, off course). Particularly, I don't see it becoming a new style, as our palate has a limit when it comes to tasting bitterness and even smelling hop oils. I think we have already reached this limit sometime ago when Imperial IPAs were conceived. So, anything ...


6

I'll answer one half and leave the other half to someone else. OG is “Original Gravity” Specific Gravity (often shorted to just ‘gravity’) is a measure of the density of a liquid. Since its is mostly water, you can compare beer’s density to water to find out how much other stuff is in it. Water has a gravity of 1.000, and beers will often have an ...


6

International Bittering Units (IBUs) are a measure of bitterness in a beer. As such, the distinguishing factor is bitterness. :) Since hops are the primary contributor to bitterness in beer, high IBU beers also tend to be hoppy (although that's not always the case, since hops added at certain points in the brewing process contribute mostly to bitterness, ...


6

You can look for breweries in your areas that give tours. These often include free tastings. (Since you mentioned you're from the Chicago area, I know there's a bus tour that takes you to different breweries in Chicago and Milwaukee. There's a fee, but you'd get to try a lot of different beers.) Also, look for brewpubs and restaurants in your area that sell ...


6

Barley wine is a style of beer: it isn't something that is made using beer as an ingredient (as you might describe whisky). There are a number of varieties of barley wine (some hoppy, and some with almost no hop characteristics), but they all have a relatively high alcohol content compared to most beers. The alcohol is produced via fermentation, the same ...


6

The red color usually comes from certain kinds of caramel malt, which comes in a range of colors but is usually used to make a sweeter, fuller-bodied beer than everyday pale ales and lagers. In this way, they're very similar to amber ale/lagers, and the difference can be very subtle and is very subjective. If you like one, you'll 99% of the time enjoy the ...


5

It's likely just naming differences. Though the BJCP has distinct categories for "Dark American Lager" and "Schwarzbier (Black Beer)". The main difference seems to be that Dark lager is sweeter and more towards caramel malt than Black which is more dry and slightly roasty.


5

Well, Saison is quite a broad category simply because it comes from a broad definition. The original term comes from regular strength light ales ca. 3.5% abv) brewed during the Autumn in Belgium, and stored for drinking in the summer by farm workers. (Hence the pseudonym "farmhouse ale".) As wikipedia states: Historically, saisons did not share ...


5

As with any style, there's a fair deal of variation from one brewery to another. At a high level, though, you can expect them to be darker (although not stout-dark), rich, and malty. Expect a complex taste, with many notes and flavors. More specifically, the BJCP have this to say (abridged): Aroma: malty sweetness, hints of caramel or chocolate, and ...


5

Let's start off with beers that you're interested in, something akin to a black lager. I'm going to keep things focused on beer styles rather than particulars, since I do not know where you are nor what might be available for you. Dunkelweizen This is a dark wheat beer with characteristics of a traditional wheat with caramel type flavors joining the mix. ...


5

The beer judge certification program style guides seem to imply they are the same. You can get more details at bjcp.org. The text below is from the 2015 guidelines double IPA category, 22A. Comments: A showcase for hops, yet remaining quite drinkable. The adjective “double" is arbitrary and simply implies a stronger version of an IPA; “imperial,” “extra,...


5

If you can purchase variety packs or cases of individual bottles where you live, that's a great way to explore -- get a couple each of a bunch of different things and use a site like RateBeer to keep track of your opinions. (I chose RateBeer because you can use it to assign a simple rating of 1-5 stars, which is good for a first approximation.) You should ...


5

When it comes to what is socially accepted in the US, ice is mostly reserved for the harsher stuff like bourbon and scotch. The ice serves a purpose of diluting the liquor, thus making it smoother on the way down. It serves a purpose for different whiskies that have harsher spice notes. Tequila, vodka, brandy, cognac, and rum should be put in the freezer ...


4

A Belgian Double is an amber/brown beer of usually 6-7.5% ABV (They can drift higher). The style was most likely originated at Westmalle in the mid 19th Century. While Trappist abbeys tend to be the origin and driver of the style, many secular Belgian breweries produce them as Abbey beers which may have actually been a brewing monastery at one point or ...


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