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17

There is no culinary basis to make that generalization. The choice of beer (or wine or any other ingredient used to add depth) may be selected to enhance, balance, contrast, or even counteract one of the other ingredients. But that doesn't necessarily make it the beverage of choice to accompany the resulting dish. The beer-as-an-ingredient may not even be ...


12

Take your cue from recipes for fish cooked in beer/ale. "Ale" (not usually specified further) and "amber beer" (example) seem to be the most common, and I can say from personal experience that these work well both for poaching fish and drinking alongside baked, broiled, or grilled whitefish.1 Of course, how your fish is flavored may affect your beer choice,...


12

Thinking about a tomato pasta, I get acids, strong aromas, and a lingering mouthfeel. Based on this, I would lean towards a Flanders Red or Flanders Brown / Oud Bruin, depending on the acidity of the sauce (the red for more acid, the brown for less). These beers tends toward a wine-like experience, with their own acids and richness. You won't have a lot ...


9

As a complete novice to food pairings with beer, I've been looking at this nifty pairing chart on http://www.craftbeer.com [PDF] whenever pairing questions have come up on Beer.SE. According to it, the suggested pairing for an IPA is Strong, spicy food (classic with curry!); bold, sweet desserts like carrot cake and for a Double/Imperial IPA is Smoked ...


8

I don't think there's a site dedicated to that purpose specifically. However, Untapped and Beermenus are probably your best bets. I've never used Untapped as I do not have a smartphone and I think they've just recently added desktop/laptop support, but I have used Beermenus. It's ok, not great though. Again, it's really up to the brewery/bar to update their ...


8

Go for lower alcohol and less hoppy. Alcoholic drinks on meat can give great flavor, but the alcohol has a tendency to dry out said meat. Some form of malty session beer would be great to cook with, if you had any near you. Rauchbier would probably work well, since that smoke flavor would really enhance the meat, but drinking it with it might be too much. ...


7

I do this about once a month and can confirm that it's more than safe, it's delicious. In fact during the 19th century half of London lived on porter and oysters! I'd recommend oyster stouts, London porters or champagne with them. Stouts and porters are particularly traditional in London


6

It depends... I don't see an issue with the standard Tums or Rolaids but there might be issues with ranitidine according to some studies. http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/news/20000215/zantac-alcohol-dont-mix "The effect was striking," says author Charles Lieber, MD. In a three-hour test period, conducted under conditions similar to social ...


6

Beer and food pairings have an entire subculture, not unlike wine. On both Ratebeer and Beer Advocate, there are entire forums dedicated to beer and food pairing. Honestly, there are an infinite number of combinations. One thing I've heard is that a lot of chefs really like pale lagers. Not because the pale lagers themselves are all that amazing (personally,...


6

In general, the rule of thumb for spicy or intensely flavorful foods is that you want hop-forward beers. The high bitterness of something like an IPA will have a slight numbing effect on your palate, cutting the intensity of spicy foods and allowing you to appreciate the complexity of a dish more than you could if you were simply overwhelmed by capsaicin.


6

I'm not a massive fan of Bailey's myself, but do love a chocolate mousse. Since unless you're going way overboard with the alcohol, you're not really going to disrupt the mousse and make it soupy, you can use anything that you think goes with chocolate. Personally, I love the following paired with a good dark chocolate: Kahlua/Tia Maria (most similar in ...


5

While pairing is generally a matter of taste and therefore no definite answers can be given, for salty food, strong food there are a couple of things to keep in mind. Rich beers are likely to overpower whatever else you are eating. I would usually pair rich beers with moderate portions of rich foods. This doesn't mean that all salty foods would be out ...


5

Personally, I have never had haggis, but pairing it with wine is not all that uncommon. Some even pair it with beer as can be seen here, but I would go with a sweet fruity red wine. Pairing wine with haggis is very common on the web. Here is a sample of how people wine with haggis: A dram of whisky works better after the meal, as its sheer strength means ...


5

When pairing dishes and drinks, you shall first ask yourself what kind of pairing you seek. Reinforcing pairing, aim to emphasis the tastes of either food or beverage, or both. A Jura oxydized wine over a smoked poultry. Correcting pairing aim to neutralize an unwelcomed taste from either, Edam cheese and Lambic/Ould Bruin, to cut the acidic dryness of the ...


5

Saperavi is a Teinturier type grape, which usually means red skins and red flesh. I have grown two of these types of grapes. Dunkelfelder and Agria and they both are used to make deep red wines that are almost undrinkable. They are usually used in very small quantities to boost the color of lighter colored grapes like Pinot Noir. On their own you need to ...


4

This of course is pretty subjective, but I will try to answer it anyway. I would say that the choice of beer in this case should depend on one of this factors: You want to accompany or match the taste of the steak and seasoning. You want to have the beer as a regular drink nearby that does not disturb the taste of the steak. I will assume that you only ...


4

CHEESE! Extremely sharp cheddar is best. A sharp Vermont or New York white cheddar will do as well. My personal favorite is Tillamook Special Reserve Extra Sharp.


4

It might sound snobbish to be peckish about the type of glass but the glass does influence the taste of the beer. Some things are: - the thickness of the glass. A thin glass invites to a more delicate way of drinking, a really thick glass would let you expect a sturdier beer. - the surface compared to the volume of beer. A big surface gives a change to ...


4

My favorite French cheese is Roquefort and is often served with nuts and honey in France. I would like to recommend an Appletini with Roquefort along with the most authentic French bread you are able to procure in your area. The French love their fruit and fruit flavored food and drinks. Appletini cocktail: Vodka with dashes apple juice and apple liqueur. ...


3

Beer glasses are mainly a product of the region in which the beer was originated and therefore tied to a specific beer. Belgian beers - Normally served in goblets because the beers have very complex aromas and the shape of the glass can help present and concentrate them for consumption. British beers - Normally served in the "nonic" glass. Simply a glass ...


3

When cooking sweeter meats like brats or other sausages, I always use very malty beers, typically of the darker variety. Nut brown ales, dopplebock, stouts are favorites. Flank steak marinated in a combo of Newcastle Brown Ale, lots of red pepper flakes, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper makes universally awesome fajita meat. If you're making sauces or ...


3

My simple rule would be to pair lighter beers with foods with lighter, more delicate flavours, and heavier beers with foods with heavier flavours. You don't want to pick a beer that will overpower your meal, or vice versa. As @ThomasOwens pointed out, preparation does make a difference. I would drink a heavy beer (like a stout) with deep-fried fish and ...


3

Cured meats - the saltiness of the meat and bitterness in the IPA play well together.


3

You are confusing the issue with alcohol and raw oysters. Alcoholism can lead to liver damage which can predispose folks towards a dangerous Vibrio infection. So folks with liver damage (including alcohol abusers) should avoid raw oysters due to the risk of vibrio. Alcohol itself has no affect on Vibrio. The low alcohol content in beer won't sterilize ...


3

Please allow me to make a second recommendation for you. This one I have not tried, but I have had the Soup au Vin with strawberries and it was absolutely great. For a twist on this blackberry wine might also go well with it (real natural blackberry wine and not the blackberry flavored ones). Simply pair your favorite champagne with a piece of flavorful ...


3

Since you mention sheep cheese and dark fruit, I'll address that type of pairing. You want a cocktail that reflects the item you pair with the cheese. Start with the Luxardo cherry in a Manhattan (epicurious on Luxardo cherries). Then, think about sweetening up the otherwise stiff-but-smooth Manhattan to better complement the cheese. For example, replace ...


3

Your main criterion, especially if you are serving sturgeon caviar, should be something to freshen the palate without leaving a strong aftertaste. A brut champagne goes exceptionally well. If keeping the Russian theme is important and you have a good eastern European shop at hand, you could try to get a Russian or Ukrainian Шампанское. Be aware that many ...


3

Caviar has a delicate flavor, and it shouldn’t compete with another ingredient, which could overwhelm it which would include either food or drink. Being a non fan of either vodka or champagne, I would like to recommend a dry white wine, which by the way should always be chilled. I would be inclined to suggest a Sauvignon Blanc as an example. Sauvignon ...


3

Thought I would add my own answer to this fine list of excellent answers. Goose is, of course, stronger-flavoured than turkey - more like game but - crucially - quite a bit fattier which makes it essential in my book to look for a wine that has a fair level of acidity. It also tends to be accompanied by powerfully flavoured accompaniments such as ...


3

If I am completely off the track here, tell me and I will delete my answer - but I will have a bash at this. I found some information Here, at decanter.com. Wine films There are several well-known films based on the drinking or making of wine or the wine industry itself. They range from American comedy-drama Bottle Shock (featuring Alan Rickman ...


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