Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
10

I think the first step in attempting to change a belief of another person is always to understand why they hold that view. That can even help with determining how likely you are to be successful. For example, if her concern is that you may be actively trying to poison her, you're probably not very likely to change her mind. But if instead her concern is just ...


7

When considering barley wine there are two varieties recognized by the BJCP in the 2015 style guidlines. The American version which has an emphasis on hops, IMO not as similar to old ale. The English version which while hoppy is also sweeter and has more fruity flavors than the American version and IMO does seem similar to old ale. If I were to compare ...


7

States often have different laws for beer and spirits, including different licensing requirements, different requirements for sales, and so forth. Because of that, some states have limits on the percentage of alcohol that is allowed in beer. In North Carolina, where I live, all spirits sales are state-controlled, and retail sales are only allowed in state-...


6

You want a mildly flavored, low hop beer for something like this. I would suggest a Kolsch or Helles Lager or a Mild. Pilsners can be heavily hopped. I have done a lot of this with wines when I taught winemaking classes at a community college near here. We used very low aroma wines like a warm climate sauvignon blanc. You want the same for this since you don'...


4

To the other answers I would add: point out that you're working from a kit. Like prepared kits for bread-machine bread, stir-fry sauces, and spice mixes, your beer kit is designed to minimize variables and avoid beginner mistakes. If you follow the instructions in the kit, you can't screw it up -- and if you did, the worst outcome would be that you don't ...


4

I've been holding off answering this question because it's very complicated. First, I am assuming the original poster wants to know sugar content in finished beer, not in pre-fermented wort. If that is not the case, I will pull my answer. In the wine industry it's pretty straight forward to measure residual sugar since all you are dealing with is leftover ...


4

Unfortunately, you're not going to easily achieve the solution to your question. Your best bet would be to find the nutritional information for the beer you seek. It isn't readily available, though, legislation has passed requiring craft beer producers to provide this information. While this sounds logical - this can significantly impact smaller craft ...


3

You should definitely all use the same beer as the base, and you want a beer that has a good balance of hops and malt. The less flavor the beer has, the more the "spiked" flavors and aromas will stand out. Too much aromatic hops (e.g., an IPA) will mask the aromas. Too much malt will mask the flavors. A lighter, neutral beer is the way to go for an ...


3

Ratebeer has list of breweries in South Korea. I see there are some in Seoul and the images show bottles, so I assume that they bottle. Go to RateBeer and in the Brewer Search area select the country. (I would have liked to give a result link, but ratebeer hides them).


3

Since I don't know which EU country you're referring to, here are some of my picks that ship to Sweden. shop.mikkeller.dk boxbeers.dk www.bieresgourmet.be www.bier-deluxe.de www.biere-revolution.com www.beergium.com


2

I can recommend www.alesbymail.co.uk I used them at Christmas 2014 to send a mixed case (chosen by myself) to my family in France. Can't remember exact European delivery costs but it was very reasonable compared to the cost of the beers or I wouldn't have used it. Check their Twitter @alesbymail for regular discount codes. (I have no affiliation with them ...


2

www.beersofeurope.co.uk are very good, used them 4 times. www.beersofeurope.co.uk/usa lists a number of beers, just a case of scrolling through and selecting into the cart/basket. Delivery is £7.50 but I find it's worth paying a bit extra to get what you want / try new beers.


2

I found this device on Amazon - which I believe will do what you want. Brix Refractometer Measure Sugar content for Beer Wine It determines the sugar content not just in beers, but in wines as well (also fruits etc.). What is a refractometer? A refractometer is an optical device that, like a hydrometer, measures the specific gravity of your beer or ...


2

Perhaps your mom is thinking that home brewing is like home canning, where a mistake can have disastrous results like growing botulism toxin. A little research into that problem shows that one of the common precautions in home canning is to add citrus juice or vinegar to the mixture of food being processed, and that it isn't required for tomato-based recipes ...


2

The question could be changed to "craft Italian beer" or "Italian real ale" instead of good. That would fix the question quality. To answer the better question, there are about 360 micro-breweries in italy under the umbrella MoBI organization (http://www.movimentobirra.it/) which is similar to CAMRA and has an English translation to their website. I would ...


2

I am not 100% versed in this but I am assuming that Canada needs to import most of their hops. This could make it too expensive to provide a quality product when the ingredients are so expensive to buy. If you take that into account and the fact that alcohol, in general, is way more expensive in Canada than in the US, it makes sense that the brewers would ...


2

If your craft beer is unfiltered, unpasteurised beer with live yeast, then any kind of transport could alter its flavour profile. Other variables that could effect its flavour are: changes in altitude (not during flight) no resting after transport (depending on yeast content up to two weeks) bottling problems (oxygen in bottleneck) difference between ...


2

From what I understand, pale ale is not as hoppy as India pale ale. So, quantity of hops in and IBU of IPA’s will be generally higher compared to pale ales. American pale ales use American hops instead of traditionally popular European hops.


2

Short answer: 17-20C (62-68F) is good for ales. The temperature of fermentation is exceedingly important for the final beer. Too low (< 15C) can cause the ale yeast to go dormant, stalling the process. While a high temperature (> 25C) can cause a rapid ferment, where the yeast creates excess esters and fusel alcohols. Yeast also generate their own ...


2

As far as I understand a "turn" is a term from Contract Brewing. Though it seems like it's slightly ambiguous term with different meanings depending on context. In this case it refers to a "turn" using the brewery and includes time in a fermentation vessel. Which is to say for $5000 you can use the facilities to brew 30 barrels of beer from start to ...


2

It is not that common, but brewers may open subsidiaries. In 2016, Stone Brewing Co. from US opened a new plant in Germany (I suspect they wanted to expand in the European market). Where would your application locate those beers? (Plant was recently sold to Scottish Brewdog). I suggest you locate beers where they are brewed.


1

It's not common that the country of origin fora beer always the same for brewers country of origin. Exploring and Expanding the business is one the most important objective for every business especially for Food and Beverages Industries. Let's take an example of well know brewery company i.e Heineken. On February 15, 1864, the Heineken is establishing and ...


1

if it is local brew may I suggest sending a message to the brewer and asked about it. for any more advice, I do think it is still good but if you want to be safe just message them for why this 1 can feels so light. edit after the comment of Eric Shain "Even if it is safe, if it is underfilled it should be replaced. – Eric Shain"


1

Why don't you do the work yourself. Google lists about 15 craft breweries in downtown Melbourne. I would have to say that's probably the most up to date list


1

I would choose Coors. It's easy to get, always tastes the same so it makes for a good control. Also, it is light in flavor so it won't mask anything.


1

Some sugars won't start a fermentation with brewer's yeast at all, such a lactose. In such case, sooner or later other organisms would take over (e.g. lactobacteria). Any sugars that can be fermented, would ferment at different speeds. As there is usually more than one kind of sugar present, the easy ones ferment first until the alcohol kills off the yeast, ...


1

Does she bake? If she does, and especially if she bakes bread, then ask her how you know her baked goods aren't poison. Beer has been known as liquid bread for many centuries for good reason; it contains essentially the same ingredients (with a bit of hop for taste so you may have to term it herb bread). If she doesn't agree that home-baked bread could be ...


1

So... I guess it depends on what you're deeming nutritional value. Beer has 4 main ingredients: Water Grain Yeast Hops The biggest mineral difference is going to come from the water source of the brewery. Following the exact same formula recipe/mashing instructions/yeast used/fermentation conditions (temperature, altitude, fermentation vessel)/time/...


1

You can measure it through distillation process, Take 100ml of beer and distill it approx 20-30 min at 85 degree Celsius. In this process the ENA will be collected separately and then the remaining content will be Sugar solution + other traces of Barley. Measure the brix of this solution, you will have your answer.!


1

Here you can find several places: Good Beer Hunting. e.g.: Craftworks [img]http://i.imgur.com/Vu4w4qm.png[/img]


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible