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TL DR; No. Beer flavor changes over time (hops fade away, oxidation takes hold, etc.), and this process happens more quickly at warmer temperatures than colder ones. But there are no additional chemical reactions caused by temperature changes, so warming to room temperature and re-chilling multiple times is not going to have any added effects on the beer. ...


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It depends on the beer really. A good rule of thumb is darker beer should be served at a warmer temperature than lighter beer. For instance if you refrigerate all of your beers and then pull them out of the fridge and drink them instantly you will miss A LOT of the flavor complexity of pretty much every stout and porter you put to your lips. But, if you ...


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Take a bucket. Or a bowl. Or a cooler. Or any other similar vessel. Put your beer bottles or cans (sealed! For the love of god, sealed!) at the bottom of the bucket. Fill it most of the way with ice. Then fill in with water until the bottles are submerged. Then throw in any remaining ice. Finally, add a volume of salt commensurate with the quantity of ...


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Beer should be chilled to the proper serving temperature, which may vary according to ingredients and brewing methods, and even most of those are not set in stone, but can also vary according to taste. Guinness, for example, has a specific serving temperature related to how it was traditionally stored in Ireland (Kegs in the "cold" room, which was often ...


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I would say that the condensate amounts to no more than 1ml for a 500ml glass, which is a 0.2% dilution. No to be too coarse, but I imagine most people dilute the beer more after taking a sip! Comparatively, I think the excessively cold temperature will contribute more to destroying the flavor than a small amount of condensate from the glass. So, if ...


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It depends on the beer style. Craft beers in general were not designed to be served at a near freezing (for water) temperature. Drink an IPA at 35 degrees and 45 degrees and you'll probably find the hop notes more pronounced at the higher temperature. Here is a general guideline: Very Cold: 35-40 degrees •American Adjunct Lagers (“Macros”) •Malt Liquors •...


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First, to clear up the myth. European beer is not served warm. Some beers, such as real ale (or cask ale) are served at cellar temperature, which while certainly above the temperature of a beer fresh out a refrigerator, at 12-14 degrees celsius (53-57F) is still much colder than room temperature. To answer your question: Mulled beer is heated beer. ...


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Serving temperature is, of course, a preference. Serve it frozen or boiling if you want. However, a few opinions are: CAMRA says that Real Ale (aka cask ale, usually english-style) should be served at 12-14 °C (54-57 °F), which is colder than room temperature, but warmer than your usually keg beer. Ratebeer says the same thing regardless of whether it’s ...


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To get beer as cold as possible, as quickly as possible, it should be submerged in a salted ice water bath. Because of the alcohol in beer, the freezing temperature of beer is slightly lower than that of water. (How much lower depends on the actual alcohol content of the beer you're cooling.) The salt in the ice water will in turn lower the freezing ...


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Another option might be some what less conservative, but instead of using ice cubes you could also use chilling rocks. This is also often used as an alternative for cooling whisky without diluting it. Soapstone is a non-porous, odorless and inert stone. It is tasteless and will not absorb odors from your freezer like ice cubes do. Soapstone has a high ...


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Somewhat related: What temperature should I serve my beer? In short, beers don't need to be served as cold as many are led to believe, and darker beers tend to be meant to serve warmer (as warm as 55°F). You certainly don't want to drink warm Coors, so maybe bring along some stouts. In case there isn't a stream around to do what @user23614 suggests, bring ...


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Repeatedly cooling and warming (to ambient temperatures) a beer can induce a permanent haze, where proteins and tannins bond to create semi-soluble molecules. While this can have an aesthetic impact, it does not impact flavour, aroma or mouthfeel. This is mostly an issue in beers where the knocking-out, or rapid cooling of the beer may not have been ...


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Heat and light are the enemies of beer. If you have a "bottle conditioned" beer -- that is, one in which live yeast are still present -- then under warmer conditions, you potentially have active yeast. To some extent, this may just increase the carbonation and alcohol content. However, if most of the fermentable sugars have already been fermented (that is, ...


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One method I know is to have large, heavy steins kept in the freezer. That way as soon as you bring beer, you can cool it by pouring into the stein. It won't cool your lukewarm beer to optimal temperature but it will give it a good few degrees drop. You can use "reusable ice cubes", which are essentially tiny plastic bags with water - that way you won't ...


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Short answer: no beer that has color-changing mountains on the side should be served warm, otherwise you'll taste it. Long answer: First, ales are traditional served warmer than pilseners, so start your selection there. Second consideration is sweet/bitter balance. Sweetness generally becomes stronger with warmer beer. Something with a bit of sour would ...


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First, there are currently beers that are served warm, particularly very dark ones. So part of it has to do with the character of beer. There are two important factors I see, looking at this as a history nut but not knowing of any sources on this topic. The first, as you say, is widespread refrigeration. But this was not the major factor in cold ...


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"Wine experts advise that white wines be served at 45 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit, light reds at about 60 degrees and more complex reds at "room temperature" or 65 to 70 degrees. [Remember, the phrase "room temperature" predates the days of central heat and air conditioning, so it generally refers to the "cellar" temperature of an earlier era.] Chilling helps ...


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Some people serve wine at the ambient temperature without knowing that some wines are better served at a specific temperature. Which temperature should be recommended in serving wine? Light dry white wines, rosés, sparkling wines: Serve at 40°F (5°C) to 50°F (10°C) to preserve their freshness and fruitiness. Think crisp Pinot Grigio and Champagne. For ...


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I did some experimentation at home to answer this question. My results indicated that room temperature and temperature fluctuation had no impact on flavour. Very high temperature (140° for 24 hours) seems to create a very slight hard to define harshness. Check out my results here: Beer Experiments: Sunlight Exposure and Temperature Regulation Beer ...


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At the Defcon security conference in Las Vegas, the Beverage Cooling Contraption Contest is an exciting outdoor event. Over the years, techniques have included adiabatic cooling (using a jet engine), dry ice, liquid nitrogen etc. In 2008, this team managed to cool a keg of beer from 80F to 33F in 35 seconds using air power, dry ice and alcohol.


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I believe the general principal is that lower temperatures will result in slower (or negligible) aging process than warmer temperatures. The results will certainly vary depending on the ABV and other qualities of the beer. Storing bottles horizontally should prevent the corks from drying.


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It's just marketing. Lager fermentations are very clean so it tends to be a beer you want to drink in a warm and humid climate. The breweries want to make beer that will sell very well locally, and that just happens to be lagers. At a commercial scale brewers are investing in temperature control regardless of ale or lager, so it's not a significant ...


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I can only speak for whiskies as I use to sell and give out samples of that stuff. There are a couple of things to understand first about whiskies. During the aging process of the whisky, the whisky is placed in a barrel to add flavour to it. If the alcohol percent is below 40%, the whisky has a hard time retaining the flavour of the barrel. This is not ...


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A freezer is too cold and fridge not cold enough. The alcohol reduces the freezing point by 0.4 C for each 1% of alcohol. So you would need a freezer with a temperature control. Since is is not far below freezing point of water you could use an ice bath and be pretty close. A 10% salt solution is about -6 C.


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Here is my take on serving wine at a variety of temperatures and colors after years and years of serving wine and drinking it. Remember storing wine and serving wine are two different things. All wine should be stored in a cool dark spot, preferably on it's side if it has a cork at around 50F degrees. Most people keep their white wine in the fridge at ...


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To quote Strongbad, "A one that is not cold, is scarcely a one at all." In supermarkets you will often see the same beers stored in refrigerated and non-refrigerated sections. Or you may be able to get a beer cold somewhere but only warm somewhere else. If you go to a large beer store you will see beer of every variety sitting in aisles. The general ...


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As stated earlier, temperature is a matter of taste regarding beer. Necessity may also play a part (Given a choice between a warm beer vs no beer it depends how thirsty you are!). German-style lagers are almost exclusively recommended to be served no lower than 6°C (43°F)no higher than 9°C (49°F), but I often find that the last (and warmest) mouthfuls from a ...


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There is a blog post which also cites this article discussing the chemical effects of cooling and dilution on whiskey. The post concluded that the mix of dilution and cooling causes the alcohol to become soluble, which releases the flavour. Ethanol becomes more soluble when whiskey is diluted and cooled, this promotes release of flavour molecules I ...


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Beers that are high in ABV, have been bottle-conditioned or have been barrel-aged are prime for aging and cellaring. Usually the brewer will say on the bottle or their website what the max amount of suggested aging time is. For instance, Goose Island Bourbon County Brand Stout state "develops over 5 years in the bottle." I bought a case of 2012 and have one ...


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This article has very good information on how CO2 interacts with beer. That being said, temperature plays a big part in the flavor of beer. Here is a the consensus of guidelines of what temperature types of beer and wine should be served. There should be nothing wrong with refrigerating your beer and then warming it up. I really enjoy the flavor ...


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