Hot answers tagged

10

There was a study about this which concluded that tapped beer can actually be better for different reasons (although taste is rather subjective). The reasons are: Beer on draught tends to have less air within the barrel compared to its bottled counterpart, meaning that the beer doesn't oxidise as quickly Beer within a barrel tends to remain cool for longer ...


10

Guinness is "carbonated" with nitrogen, where most beers use carbon dioxide. This requires different hardware, bottling equipment, etc. If you've ever witnessed the appearance of a perfectly poured Guinness, and paid more than $5 USD for it, you'll understand why. It's partly about presentation. As one of the oldest beers on the market, it requires us to ...


8

Yes, tap lines that aren't cleaned regularly (every few weeks at least) are susceptible to infection, and you can detect these infections by taste or smell alone. Common bacteria involved are Pediococcus acidilactici and and Lactobacillus which Tasting Beer describes as having a buttery or "goaty, sweat socks" like aroma/flavor. I think that probably ...


8

Draft isn't a very regulated term but most often draws its meaning from context. At a bar, draft is usually placed opposite bottled, meaning like you said that the beer is pushed using gas from a keg or drawn via vacuum from a cask. This is the actual meaning of draft. But.. On bottles and cans it most often means "Like-Draft", or the marketing ...


7

Question one: how does bottled beer differ from draught beer? This varies from beer to beer, and should be handled on a beer-to-beer basis. Sometimes beer in the bottle is pasteurized, while the keg is not. Sometimes one or the other is filtered, while the other is not. The gas content can also differ, since this is adjustable in draught systems but not with ...


6

Draft beer does not give you a hangover, headache, or any kind of sickness just because it is a draft beer. If you’ve ever felt sick after drinking draft beer, you either: Had too much Drank from a dirty tap.


5

Guinness Draft is an Irish Dry Stout, a session beer, with alcohol by volume at 4.2%. It is intended that you can sit and drink several pints without becoming overly intoxicated. Compare that with Bud Light, which is 4.3%. Guinness has much more flavor than Bud Light, or any other similar American Light Lager beers. If you compare it with Guinness Extra ...


4

Guinness, and a few other beers out there, are carbonated in part with nitrogen, which has much smaller bubbles. This creates a smoother mouthfeel; this is the "creaminess" that is often described. The use of nitrogen is probably uncommon for a few reasons. Firstly, there's the added production cost in the bottled or canned product: the widget. Secondly, ...


4

I can think of three possible impacts this scheme might have on a keg of beer. Since the keg is kept at room temperature, if the beer is unpasteurized the flavor will evolve at a faster rate than refrigerated beer would. This isn't a change due to the quick cooling, per se, but it is a possibly major difference. As mentioned by @acheong, the CO2 ...


4

As long the beer's sealed, there should be no difference in taste due to rapid or slow cooling. Lowering the temperature only increases the solubility of CO2, which should dissolve later. Temperature itself does impact taste, supposedly due to our taste buds being number in cold, hiding certain flavors (which can be desirable or undesirable depending on the ...


2

There are disposable kegs that work the way you describe - with a inner pouch that is filled with beer and gas pressure is applied to the outside of that. For draught systems that directly push the beer, there are these gasses in common use: air - such as with a hand-pump CO2 - homebrewers and short runs N2 - for creamflow beers or where the beer line is ...


2

According to the article you linked to, the specific draw of tank beer is that it's unpasteurized. This does also exist (albeit not served from tanks) in the form of Real Ale, or Cask Ale in Britain. Historically, this was not only popular, but the primary distribution mechanism for beer in Britain a hundred years ago. However, its popularity has ...


2

The beer called Guinness draft in Ireland would be called Guinness On Tap in locations such as New York. The reason for the emphasis on draft versus in bottle is quality and taste. In my experience over recent decades, people pay extra for the most popular bottled beers in the US and in my opinion this is because of the guaranteed quality of bottled. ...


2

Because you end up drinking more of it ;-)


1

Any alcoholic drink will cause a hangouver if you drink too much. Bottled beer and draft beer are basically the same product, they should produce the same hangover. But it's easier to drink too much of draft beer as they are typically served in larger volumes. The exception are darker beverages (like wine and cognac), they produce worse hangovers because ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible