The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
26

Bacon Beer I've heard of beers made with rauchmalt - smoked malt, where the brewer has "dry hopped" with bacon or bacon flavored soya to give the beer a bacon flavor and aroma - allowing the bacon and the smoked malt to enhance each other. One commercial example is Bacon Maple Ale from Rogue, which features a variety of smoked malts (over different woods) ...


19

It depends on the brew really; some do and others do not. More often than not, the chocolate flavor comes from the techniques used to roast the malts rather than chocolate itself. Some brewers will add additional chocolate to enhance the chocolate flavor a bit, but it generally doesn't get its flavor primarily from the chocolate. The same is true for coffee ...


15

There are two main ingredients in beer that might cause them to be unsuitable for vegans. The first one might be fairly obvious. Honey is sometimes used as a sweetener, especially in meade, but certainly in other beers. However, the main cause is a fining agent called Isinglass that is made from ground swim bladders of fish.


13

A rye beer is any beer that incorporates rye, usually malted rye. How much Rye and how it tastes There are no laws to state that the quantity of rye should be above some minimum, so some rye beers include just a few percent of the malt bill as rye, while others such as Roggenbier base their entire flavor profile on rye, using over 50% rye malt. With such ...


11

I recently had their "Crime" and loved it. Here are some other beers brewed with Jalapenos, but not a whole lot from major breweries like Stone. Rogue - Chipotle Ale "smoked jalapeno peppers" Twisted Pine - Ghost Face Killah "serrano, jalapeno, habanero, fresno, anaheim" (notoriously hot) Alaskan - Jalapeno Imperial IPA Horseheads - Hot-Jala-Heim "...


10

There are no alcoholic beverages made from the "nectar" of flowers per se. It would be very difficult/expensive to collect 100% flower nectar straight from flowers in sufficient quantities to make a beverage. Having said that, honey is essentially flower nectar collected by bees and regurgitated in the hive as a future food source. You can enjoy fermented ...


8

At the most basic you need: A grain, somehow modified to ferment with yeast (see below) Water Yeast Other additives to impart flavor and help preserve the brew (hops or gruit usually). The grains are usually malted but note that rice doesn't malt using the normal process, so typically with rice beers you have some other process for extracting starches (...


7

Yes. Typically chocolate stout does contain chocolate. I've typically added chocolate to my home-brew during the boil phase (since it adds more sugars and I want the chocolate to melt).


7

With regards to the beer, 4 things primarily determine the amount and consistency of head: Types of malt used: light malt typically produces larger, more dish-soapy bubbles. Roasted or dark malts will typically produce smaller bubbles. The proteins in the malt are what determine the consistency of the bubbles. There are additives that can alter and enhance ...


7

(Assuming you are referring to "plain" beers, not beers with weird ingredients) The only allergen that is present in normal beers is malt that contains gluten. Gluten intolerant people can therefor react to beer very aggressively. Next, I would guess the alcohol. Some people have violent reactions to any form of alcohol. Then, maybe the bitterness or just ...


7

This is not a jalapeno beer, but along the same lines. Ballast Pointe brewery out of San Diego, CA makes what they call a Habanero Sculpin IPA. It is delicious and you can find it all the way over here on the east coast in NC. It has a very nice kick to it- it's great with a steak or something kind of heavy, but not so great for beer pong as the habanero ...


7

I was surprised at how tough it was to track down anything that clearly mentioned both. Firstly, from several recipes, including this one, it seems that simple syrup is made, as you might expect, by dissolving sugar into an equal amount of water and then cooling. When it comes to invert sugar, recipes seem to call for more sugar and possibly an acid, be it ...


6

Another example is oyster stout. While some breweries today use the name for beers that don't contain oysters, it was originally brewed with oysters. It seems that the style grew out of the popular food pairing of stout and oysters, leading to attempts to combine the two, starting in New Zealand in 1929. One example of a modern brewery using oysters is ...


6

This is a simple question to ask but has a longer answer with a ton of complexities you probably don't care about if you are not brewing your own. Ultimately sweet beers are part of the style they are in so avoiding sugary sweet beers is as simple as knowing the styles. You can skip to the bottom if that's all you want to know. There are two types of ...


6

The chances of corn being grown for industrial purposes, like making dextrose have a very high probability of being GMO. If you are buying specialty grains (like for steeping), the probability of those ingredients being genetically modified are much lower. That said, finding out whether or not your adjunct is made from GMO corn (or rice) is very difficult. ...


6

There are many Jalapeno beers out there. Here is a list of the top 50 rated beers brewed with jalapeno (source): Arizona Wilderness American Presidential Stout Indeed / Northbound Hot Box Imperial Smoked Pepper Porter Stone Smoked Porter - Chipotle Peppers Two Henrys Roasted Jalapeño Blueberry Porter Fate (AZ) Chocolate Chili Milk Stout - Jalapeño Trois ...


6

There is a whole class of drinks called Shrubs Shrubs usually involve a base syrup made from vinegar and fruits and spices and then mixed with a spirit. Shrub syrups are available online in a variety of flavors and there are plenty of recipes out there too for creating your own Shrubs at home. My experience with and what I would define as a example ...


6

All I've seen anywhere is that the base is eau-de-vie. Eau-de-vie means different things in different places but, in France (where St. Germain hails from) it basically means any distillate. I'd venture to say, since St. Germain refuses to specify, that it's actually a blend of unaged fruit brandys. If this is the case, it almost certainly includes pear (who'...


6

Yes, wine can pretty much be made from all edible fruit, including tomatoes. But the reason we make wine out of grapes is three fold. Sugar, tannins and acids. Sugar. Grapes produce the highest naturally occurring amount of sugar of any fruit. Almost no other fruit comes close. Grapes have the ability to make wines that are anywhere from 10-18% alcohol and ...


6

There are two ways to make wine from raisins. Soak the raisins in water and boil and then macerate, ferment and separate the solids from the wine and age. You can make something close to wine. Most raisin grapes are Thompson Seedless grapes which are white grapes. It might be cloudy if you don't use pectic enzymes. Here is a recipe The more traditional ...


5

No. An adjunct is simply an ingredient that is not strictly necessary to brew the beer. In some cases the purpose of the adjunct is to reduce costs, while in others it is to achieve certain flavours (e.g. in honey beers, or various spiced beers). If cost is the primary concern, then GMO ingredients may be picked if they are cheapest. When adjuncts are ...


5

Generally you won't find coriander or other spices added to hefeweizen beers, due to the traditional beer purity law. However, one famous exception is Gose: http://www.germanbeerguide.co.uk/gose.html


5

Guinness, in common with some other beers, does actually involve a meat product in the brewing process, specifically the swim bladders of fish. This substance is not nominally retained in the final beverage.


5

A recent release by an Icelandic brewery actually contains whale meat, and inevitably this has been quite controversial! Whale Meat Beer From Icelandic Brewery Stirs Up Controversy, Outrages Conservationists. I'd like to try it myself but it's not for export and the only way I could afford to get to Iceland anytime soon would be canoe. Seems a bit chilly ...


5

Mint extract and mint oil won't do the same thing as leaves, not exactly. The flavor is different. If you infuse it with mint leaves, the flavor can have a more "leafy" or herbal quality, not necessarily a good thing. And infusions can change the color of your liquor, which if you're drinking it straight is not ideal. For these reasons, I'd use extract. It's ...


5

No, they are not related at all. Except when they are. Let me explain. There are a couple of ways to make a wine sweet. Ferment to dryness, filter and then add something sweet. Make a wine with so much sugar that the yeast can't finish Stop fermentation before it ends (filtering or alcohol) and leave some sweetness Almost all grapes can be made into sweet ...


4

A few notes on brewing and the seasons. It isn't a question of availability today but there are other factors that likely have seasonal impact. Traditionally (say, 1000 years ago), yes, brewing recipes would vary with the seasons. Some ingredients like henbane seed or barley keep extremely well. Others do better fresh (herbs and such). It is likely ...


4

Some beer use animal by-products in their production. Guinness is popular example: isinglass, a swim bladder, is as a filter or fining agent.


4

Sourness may have been, in a higher or lower level, a common characteristic of beers centuries ago, specially after some time of storage, once the common vessel to keep it was wooden barrels, and wood often harbor a lot of microorganisms, including bacteria and wild yeast, the former being responsible for souring the beer. After the Industrial Revolution, ...


4

Sure, there are major differences in acidity. Unsurprisingly, the sour beer styles can have very low pH levels. Here's an example of someone measuring the pH of sour beers and finding that even within that category there are significant differences. Here's a short presentation showing that expected pH ranges from 3.2-3.4 for Berliner Weisse to 4.5-4.8 for ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible