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35

Bourbon is a type of whiskey, whereas not all whiskies are bourbons! Bourbon is a type of whiskey that gets its name from Bourbon County, Kentucky, where it originated. Bourbon tends to be amber-colored, and a little sweeter and heavier in texture than other whiskeys. What make a bourbon a bourbon and not just an ordinary whiskey? The following is from ...


23

There is a way peatiness or smokiness is measured scientifically: the phenol count in parts per million (PPM) however this isn't as useful as it sounds, as different phenols taste and smell different. Using the phenol measurement you can chart some examples as follows: Ardbeg - 55 Laphroaig - 40 Lagavulin - 35 Caol Ila - 30 Talisker - 25 Highland Park - 20 ...


14

For blended whisky, the age is not generally considered a relevant factor. There will be a range of ages and whiskies in there, chosen to make the end result. Unless a particular blend has ages specified (the Grant's Family Reserve doesn't), all you can guarantee is that the youngest whisky is 3 years old. As an example, another Grant's whisky, the 12 ...


12

Legally, a Scotch Whisky is a distilled spirit made in Scotland from cereals, water and yeast and has been matured for a period of not less than three years (The Scotch Whisky Regulations 2009). An Irish Whiskey is distilled in Ireland and aged for a minimum of three years in oak barrels. Thus an Irish distillery can not produce a Scottish whisky! However ...


10

Just like wine, whisky demands a reasonable glass that will help rather than hinder the aromas. Avoid shot glasses and wide-mouthed tumblers, and go for something like the Glencairn Whisky Glass, or a tulip glass or even a brandy snifter. Pour an amount that will let you swirl the whisky without sloshing it. Swirl it to coat the sides, which will allow you ...


9

The bottle you are talking about will be 6 years old: it ages from the day of distillation and it will stop aging once it has been bottled (properties can change but for all intents and purposes it has stopped aging once it has been bottled) I would even go on to say that it will pretty much be impossible to find a whiskey that is from this year as they ...


9

It would seem like you hit the nail on the head: The main benefit would be that distillers can put out whisky that's younger and still charge a higher price. In the Scotch market age isn't just a sign of quality, it's also a sign of status. Rich people will spend a lot of money on bottles that are as old as 25 to 50 years, even if there is a very minimal ...


9

Whisky will never go bad after it's opened and kept closed and away from sunlight. How should I store my Scotch Whisky? Unlike wine, whisky does not mature in the bottle. So even if you keep a 12 year old bottle for 100 years, it will always remain a 12 year old whisky. As long as the bottle is kept out of direct sunlight, the Scotch Whisky will ...


9

Bourbon and scotch are types of whiskey and cognac is a variety of brandy. Bourbon is a type of whiskey, whereas not all whiskies are bourbons! The main difference between scotch and whisky is geographic: they are made in Scotland. Bourbon is a type of whiskey, whereas not all whiskies are bourbons! Bourbon is a type of whiskey that gets its name from ...


8

Aging or 'Finishing' is an extension of the maturation process, when the spirit is subsequently filled into empty casks that previously held other wines or spirits for a further relatively short period at the end of maturation. The selection of casks can affect the character of the final whisky. Outside of the United States, the most common practice is ...


8

Unfortunately there's no good way to guarantee you'll get something you'll like. However, there are some things you can do to help: Find reviews that you agree with of whisk(e)ys you like. Note who wrote them and how they described the spirit. Try to find other reviews by those reviewers and look for the same descriptors. Ignore words like "smooth" and pay ...


7

No. There is no "objective" way to map your tastes to what is in the bottle. It's purely a subjective exercise. There is also this website Master of Malt Samples that might be able to ship 3cl bottles to you.


7

Corn. The differences between those drinks ("made for U.S. consumption"), and the difference between whiskey and bourbon are two separate questions (the former has been well answered). Beverage manufacturers can hem and haw all they want about the nomenclature of their products, but that does not change the dictionary's definitions of the words: whiskey ...


7

A distillery is just a building at the end of a day, the flavor of a whiskey comes from the ingredients and equipment used inside it. In whiskey making the equipment used makes a big difference in the end product, here's a non-exhaustive list: Stills: stills are used to concentrate alcohol, the shape and material used for stills make a great difference in ...


6

First, we have to understand why we age whiskey in the first place. It's primarily to extract compounds from the wood of the barrels (and any previous contents) so that they can add flavor and complexity to the final product. From there, there are several factors that determine how long a typical aging period might be. If the wood in the barrels is ...


6

One whiskey that I know of is the Snow Grouse it is a blended grain whiskey that as by the name is supposed to be drank cold. Some would even say that this whiskey is better straight from the freezer


5

Wikipedia is a great resource. The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5) state that bourbon made for U.S. consumption[18] must be: Produced in the United States[19] Made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn[20] Aged in new, charred oak barrels[20] Distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% ...


5

Hard spirits naturally degrade over time once opened You've already opened the bottle because you wanted to actually enjoy the drink, here are step you can take to help ensure the slow and unstoppable flavor degradation takes as long as possible. Store out of the light in a cool and dry place. A good general rule of thumb for just about any type of ...


5

Personally, I have never had haggis, but pairing it with wine is not all that uncommon. Some even pair it with beer as can be seen here, but I would go with a sweet fruity red wine. Pairing wine with haggis is very common on the web. Here is a sample of how people wine with haggis: A dram of whisky works better after the meal, as its sheer strength means ...


5

This question may end up being closed as too broad, as a full answer to this would include many lifetimes of experience by master distillers, and would have to incorporate opinions (some people find peaty, smoky whiskies absolutely foul and undrinkable while others would not ever want to drink a mild lowland whisky) That said, I'll summarise my most ...


5

I'd say yes, but with the caveat that I've only tried a limited number of Irish whiskies (mostly big name brands) and so they might be a bit more varied than I'm aware of. I'm largely ignorant of what goes into the distilling process of both Irish whisky and Scotch, but what I notice as a taster is that Irish whisky is often very sweet, with more like a ...


4

Suntory and Kavalan whiskey have really put Asian Whiskey on "the map." The Yamazaki Single Malt Sherry Cask, by Suntory even won Jim Murray's Whiskey of the Year in 2015. The styles are the same as other distiller's, though I am sure there are a few exceptions. Nikka Coffee Grain Whiskey comes to mind. The difference - it seems - is in the craftsmanship. ...


4

So, I am answering assuming you want to stick with single malts rather than go blended. Also because people live in different parts of the world, prices may vary. I would recommend Glenfiddich 12-y as a standard go to single malt and usually a bit cheaper than the rest. Other good brands include Dalwhinnie and Dalmore(this one being my personal favorite) ...


4

What is the official way to drink a Boilermaker? First of all there are two types of boilermakers. A boilermaker can refer to two types of beer cocktail. In American terminology, the drink consists of a glass of beer and a shot of whiskey.1 The beer is either served as a chaser or mixed with the whiskey. When the beer is served as a chaser, the drink is ...


4

Liquor casks are not cleaned between transfers, just emptied and stored until they need them again. The liquor that soaked into the wood makes sure nothing will grow in them. Wine barrels on the other hand, need to be cleaned between transfers. Typically they are rinsed with hot water and then maybe steam. Left to drip dry for a day or two. Then sulfur ...


4

The barrels are pumped out at the winery. The barrels are probably rinsed with hot water until it's free of the gunk from the wine making process. Then left to drip dry for a while for a few days. If they are going to be used for spirits, the barrel head has to be taken off and then the barrel is charred on the inside. Otherwise, you won't get any of that ...


4

Is peaty whiskey made in other parts of the world besides Islay? The short answer is yes. Here are five examples from around the world: 5 Smoky World Whiskies Challenging Scotch When the topic of smoky whisky comes up in a bar it’s usually in association with Scotland, and more so, the famed isle of Islay. From Lagavulin to Bowmore, Islay enjoys a ...


3

A true Scotch whisky has to be aged at least 5 years to qualify as whisky. Beyond that, the factors that change over time are: colour nose flavour The whisky takes on these from the wood, and from the previous contents. So for a really well rounded whisky, especially for a full bodies peaty, smoky whisky, that age is essential. That said, there are some ...


3

You will find that Porters/Stouts tend to hold up to whiskey/bourbon/scotch better than others. Though, I'm sure you'll find exceptions. One of my favorites is New Holland's - Dragon's Milk with about 1.5-2 ounces of Crown Royal.


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