Hot answers tagged

24

First, I love this question because it is actually interesting. I researched this when I noticed that bottled coke tasted so much better than canned coke. Cans keep out all light so the contents actually never become tainted. The reason that most like bottled over canned is because they like the taste with those impurities. Some complain that they can ...


24

As a member of a Studentenverbindung, having one principle of scientia, we of course tested this a long time ago with around a dozen or maybe a bit more testers. We poured beer from the same manufacturer (fresh batch) into glasses and had people taste them, and for every glass (everyone had multiple ones) they had to say if they think it was from a bottle, ...


22

A modern canned beer should never taste like metal. If it does, you're probably drinking straight from the can, and while the folks at The Alchemist might recommend that, I can't say I share their view. Modern beer cans are lined with a water-based chemical that essentially ensures that your beer never touches metal. This in turn means that strictly ...


22

In short, no. As explained by George de Piro, a biochemist and Brewmaster of C. H. Evans Brewing Company— When light hits beer, it provides the energy necessary to drive a reaction that transforms the iso-alpha-acids into 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. The “thiol” part of that somewhat cumbersome name indicates that there is sulfur present. Sulfur compounds ...


20

The short answer is that the beer will not last long after opening, and in most cases you are best off resealing the bottle with an airtight cap/stopper that can withstand mild pressure. Two things you want to prevent in this situation are: oxidation of the beer, which will change the taste of a beer. loss of carbonation. For non-carbonated drinks such as ...


17

Beer should be chilled to the proper serving temperature, which may vary according to ingredients and brewing methods, and even most of those are not set in stone, but can also vary according to taste. Guinness, for example, has a specific serving temperature related to how it was traditionally stored in Ireland (Kegs in the "cold" room, which was often ...


15

Well you're going to be the genius here, because as it turns out, they're both wrong. First, we're going to eliminate "novel" options for cooling, like liquid nitrogen and fire extinguishers, and limit ourselves to ways we can cool bottles every day in the freezer. What we need to maximize here is thermal conductivity. Since the goal here is ...


14

I heard a quote from the revered Charlie Bamforth, who basically said that packaging beers in cans was a far better way to preserve the beer from brewery to customer than packaging in bottles, but bottles are still more aesthetically pleasing to the customer, so they are usually preferred. And that's from a man that has been head of Quality Assurance for a ...


14

In general, you just want to store your beer bottles standing upright. For tons of detail on bottle storage, BeerAdvocate has a great guide, but in short: storing a standard shaped beer bottle upright minimizes the surface area exposed to air in the bottle, slowing oxidation, and preventing spoilage. Additionally, in the case of unfiltered or bottle ...


11

Yes, they will. Given beer is (generally speaking) more than 90% water, and water expands when frozen, beer will make a mess of your freezer if left in there too long. The bottles themselves don't tend to break, in my experience, but the cap seals fail and the beer will leak out everywhere.


10

The Life of Wine (after opening) The short answer is approximately 3-5 days, but it all depends on the type of wine. There are a number of factors at play when it comes to the life of wine, after it has been opened. These include acetic acid bacteria that consumes the alcohol in wine and metabolizes it into acetic acid and acetaldehyde. This causes the ...


10

To get beer as cold as possible, as quickly as possible, it should be submerged in a salted ice water bath. Because of the alcohol in beer, the freezing temperature of beer is slightly lower than that of water. (How much lower depends on the actual alcohol content of the beer you're cooling.) The salt in the ice water will in turn lower the freezing ...


9

Whisky will never go bad after it's opened and kept closed and away from sunlight. How should I store my Scotch Whisky? Unlike wine, whisky does not mature in the bottle. So even if you keep a 12 year old bottle for 100 years, it will always remain a 12 year old whisky. As long as the bottle is kept out of direct sunlight, the Scotch Whisky will ...


8

I've looked into this quite a bit; I was thinking of building a beer rack as a winter project. However, All my research tells me that beer should always be stored upright, no matter what variety, unlike wine which is best stored on its side. Beer advocate has an interesting article on the subject. For corked bottles, one does not want to impart any off-...


8

Not really. In theory, larger bottles mean that the little bit of air trapped at the top of the bottle is smaller compared to the volume of beer than it would be in a standard 12 oz bottle. However, I've been unable to find any research backing this up, and anecdotally it makes no difference. Larger bottles are favored for aging beers mostly for practical ...


7

There are some rules of thumb. First, if it's a hop-oriented beer (pales, IPAs), drink sooner than later, as the hop aromas and flavor will fade over time. Second, the higher the alcohol by volume (ABV, think imperial stouts), the better chance it has of lasting longer. That said, it may be best to ask the brewer what the recommended shelf life is for any ...


7

With regards to the beer, 4 things primarily determine the amount and consistency of head: Types of malt used: light malt typically produces larger, more dish-soapy bubbles. Roasted or dark malts will typically produce smaller bubbles. The proteins in the malt are what determine the consistency of the bubbles. There are additives that can alter and enhance ...


7

Heat and light are the enemies of beer. If you have a "bottle conditioned" beer -- that is, one in which live yeast are still present -- then under warmer conditions, you potentially have active yeast. To some extent, this may just increase the carbonation and alcohol content. However, if most of the fermentable sugars have already been fermented (that is, ...


7

I actually do not think that the can itself changes the taste of the beer as much as the beer placed in the can may be a little different. I think that the real difference is going to be between keg beer and can/bottle beer. Canned/bottled beer has a longer shelf life than keg beer. Canned/bottled beer has a shelf life of roughly 45-60 days, whereas a keg ...


7

The likely answer is somewhere between carbonation pressure and marketing. It's hard to find numbers for how much caps can handle vs corks but you should notice that most corked beers also come in bottles with very thick glass, this is because the beer inside is at a higher pressure than most other styles. Most beer styles will fall pretty close to 2.0 ...


7

They do not explode (in a sense of explosion crushing your freezer) but may break. I have forgotten once three (different) bottles of beer in the freezer over night. Results: a) broken off bottom, b) sealed off cap, c) nothing happened (with the bottle, the beer turned to beer-ice of course).


6

I don't know how/if the actual storage in cans vs bottles affects the taste, however you should expect that they are not filled with the same beer. Many companies will have different production logistics, and the can will often come from a different site than a bottle of the same brand, and will have slightly different water and production process, so the ...


6

There should be no reason why beer would lose any quality from being left out at room tempreture then being re-cooled. During the brewing and distribution process beer is exposed to a wide range of tempretures numerious times. Some specialst beers may include "adjuncts" or additional ingredients(fruit, honey etc...) that may be effect quality with a ...


6

IPAs don't age well, or at all. The sooner they're consumed, the better they taste (or taste as intended). Are most of the craft beers you have, IPAs? If so, a "Best by:" would make sense. Meanwhile, some styles taste better aged, e.g. barleywines, imperial souts, sours. You definitely wouldn't see a "Best by:" for these types, and in fact you might even ...


6

The (relatively) high alcohol, presence of anti-bacterial compounds from hops, and low pH of beer make it inhospitable to most micro-organisms. Given, it's beer, and cool and sealed: Yes, it's safe to drink. But it will be flat!


5

As you might expect, cans can impart a metallic flavor on some beer, but on the flip-side, they are much less prone to skunking. So if you're looking to store the beer for a while in a cool, dark place, I'd say bottle. However, if you plan on keeping it in a light place or outdoors, a can is probably your best bet.


5

The ideal temperature for storing beer is between 10 to 15 ˚C (50 to 59 ˚F). If you are planning to preserve your beer for several years, it is better to have an even lower temperature of about 4 to 10 ˚C (40 - 50 ˚F). A cold cellar is ideal to preserve your beer as a humidity of about 60% - 65%. The reason being that it can affect the airtightness of the ...


5

Certain wavelengths of light are responsible for skunking beer. I believe these are mostly in the blue and ultraviolet parts of the spectrum. Brown bottles do the best at blocking out the UV rays. This is why you can get an occasional Rolling Rock that tastes off. I've never heard of a UV reflective coating before, but it makes sense. What follows is ...


5

I typically drink all of the beer in a sitting, or share it with someone. However, if you need to save it, a good cork will work. Pour the beer you want in a glass, cork it and return it to whatever cooling method you used before.


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