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10

The Life of Wine (after opening) The short answer is approximately 3-5 days, but it all depends on the type of wine. There are a number of factors at play when it comes to the life of wine, after it has been opened. These include acetic acid bacteria that consumes the alcohol in wine and metabolizes it into acetic acid and acetaldehyde. This causes the ...


9

It's a fairly long story, but here goes... First "Fox Grapes" are American grapes. There are several species of vitis that are used for wine production. I think in this case it's vitis labrusca. So, here's what happened. Somewhere in the 1860s a French researcher brought grapevines from the USA to France in pots with soil. He planted them in a vineyard to ...


8

There are many wines which are for sale at many thousands of pounds/dollars that no-one will ever drink, and that are not expected to have a good taste at all - they are simply priced there through scarcity. A rare item is going to demand a higher price from an interested buyer than a commodity item. While I may be able to tell the difference between a £10 ...


8

Oh... something I am a real expert at! You are mixing your context when calling vines hybrids. There are three ways you can grow grapes for fruit. 100% original "own rooted" vines, grafted vines and hybridized vines. Let's back up so I can explain why that is. Many Americans in the 1600-1800s tried unsuccessfully to bring European vines to North America ...


8

The best way to take out bad corks is with an Ah So. Keeps the crumbly corks together better. Instead of picking at the cork, push it back into the bottle and then strain the wine through a stainless steel tea strainer like this: Many times the wine is good, but when the cork is that bad it's probably oxidized to hell, vinegar or corked. The only way to ...


8

Highly unlikely that the alcohol went up. Four reasons. The alcohol already in the wine is a barrier for the yeast to re-ferment. The sulfites in the wine could inhibit refermentation if it hasn't dissipated yet. The cold temperatures that will also inhibit fermentation. Many commercial wines are sterile filtered so yeast counts are zero to very, very ...


7

It all depends on what you are making and what you are drinking! Some people reach for the cheap bottle that's in the door of the fridge when making a braise, where the wine will cook for a long time. Others use the type of wine you’d serve with dinner to make the dish. Even better, unless you’re pouring something rare or expensive, buy an extra bottle and ...


7

Very few people stomp grapes anymore for commercial winemaking. There are some wineries that still do it, I've heard of several in burgundy. Maybe some really old world stuff in Eastern Europe. The problem is that is super messy. Grapes are very sweet and when that juice dries on you, it is very sticky. Machines are much more efficient at crushing and ...


7

There are several factors at play here. If we think about how grapes were maintained hundreds or thousands of years ago, it was kind of a slapdash affair. In the beginning they probably just grabbed whatever grapes they could off a vine growing up a tree. Later they just haphazardly planted grapes in a field hoping for the best and they mixed everything, Red ...


7

It's pretty unlikely. Given that it was a commercial wine I don't there was much live, viable yeast in the bottle. Particularly if sulfites were added, triggering additional fermentation would probably be difficult. On top of that, refrigerating it for the whole 24 hours means that, even if there was viable yeast uninhibited by sulfites, it's very unlikely ...


7

Why are wine bottle volumes in centiliters not in liters or milliliters? Part of the answer is in the marketing system used in a particular country or region and part of it would be about the size of bottle being purchased. In Canada and the USA, in a standard bottle of wine, there are 750 millilitres (ml), 75 centilitres (cl) or 0.75 litres (l). Wine ...


7

There are several things going on. Mouton Rothschild is on of the few "first growth" Bordeaux wineries. All of them are highly collectible. New bottles go for between $600 and $700 for Mouton Rothschild, from a quick glance around the internet, which is a jump in price from the bottle you are looking at. 1993 wasn't the best vintage in Bordeaux, which is ...


6

Yes the alcohol cooks off but the flavor is not in the alcohol. If you would not drink it then don't cook with it. The flavor of the wine will come through. For me I do not cook with an expensive full body red as then just too much comes through. More about grape and just get a decent wine. Like Chardonnay with clams you would get some oak coming ...


6

All wine that you want to age for a long time should be kept at the same temperature. The difference in temperatures come when you want to serve the wine. White should be served at a lower temperature than cellar temperature. Red wine, ideally, should be served at cellar temperature. What is the ideal cellar temperature? That is open to debate, but somewhere ...


6

It's a stand to hold your puller on a flat surface so it sits upright.


6

Well, Champagne has to come from Champagne and has made out of a combination of 3 grapes (Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier or Chardonnay) and made using the Méthode Champenoise techniques. They think this truly reflects the terroir of the Champagne region. They were one of the first to assert their regional identity around the world by enforcing their region name ...


6

As a safe bet, dry still red wines should be served between 18-20°C Of course exceptions apply... Opening time prior to service depends on the vintage, older wines (4+ years) need to breathe longer than young wines (0-3 years). Knowing what kind of wine you have would help, denomination and vintage being the most useful information.


6

It depends on how sweet you are looking for. If you are looking for very sweet than dessert wines are the way to go, a Sauternes or Mustacel will be at least 12% if not higher. If all you want is a fruitier wine then many German white wines like Rieslings or Gewürztraminers tend to be on the sweet side, sometimes too sweet for many palates. Slightly less ...


6

Your question is a little vague. I'm assuming by the nature of your question, you mean the health benefits as opposed to the environmental benefits. Having been growing organic wine grapes for 18 years I think I can address both issues. I might have a more controversial view than most people, but in the end I don't think it makes a lot of difference to drink ...


6

I have pretty extensive experience blending wine in my winery over 15 years. There are two types of blends. Pre-fermentation and post-fermentation. The pre-fermentation is usually called a "field blend". This was the old style way of blending wines before we started doing it in the lab. Growers would plant a variety of vines, for example Cabernet Franc, ...


6

Simple answer is yes! The more complex answer is that it might not taste all that great but I've had some aged sparkling wines that were 10+ years old and were quite nice. But having lost it's carbonation does not make it bad, it will taste just like you described, cheap old wine.


6

You have a lot of information right out of Wikipedia when searching for Ancient Rome + wine, and too much for it to be copied or gathered here. But here is some information I also learnt from History courses or readings. Basically, many wines (Greece, France, Italy...) were kind of "sour" and people were used to adding spices (among other things), not only ...


6

Glühwein is part of a larger category of heated and spiced wines called Mulled Wines. They are popular all over Europe and go by more names than I can cite here. The tradition is first recorded in ancient Rome in the 2nd Century. I could just cut and paste the excellent Wikipedia article, but here is a link to save us all the hassle. Mulled Wines


6

Yes, wine can pretty much be made from all edible fruit, including tomatoes. But the reason we make wine out of grapes is three fold. Sugar, tannins and acids. Sugar. Grapes produce the highest naturally occurring amount of sugar of any fruit. Almost no other fruit comes close. Grapes have the ability to make wines that are anywhere from 10-18% alcohol and ...


6

There are two ways to make wine from raisins. Soak the raisins in water and boil and then macerate, ferment and separate the solids from the wine and age. You can make something close to wine. Most raisin grapes are Thompson Seedless grapes which are white grapes. It might be cloudy if you don't use pectic enzymes. Here is a recipe The more traditional ...


6

Some people serve wine at the ambient temperature without knowing that some wines are better served at a specific temperature. Which temperature should be recommended in serving wine? Light dry white wines, rosés, sparkling wines: Serve at 40°F (5°C) to 50°F (10°C) to preserve their freshness and fruitiness. Think crisp Pinot Grigio and Champagne. For ...


5

Mint extract and mint oil won't do the same thing as leaves, not exactly. The flavor is different. If you infuse it with mint leaves, the flavor can have a more "leafy" or herbal quality, not necessarily a good thing. And infusions can change the color of your liquor, which if you're drinking it straight is not ideal. For these reasons, I'd use extract. It's ...


5

Make a kir royale with it. Add a small amount of a strong, fruity liqueur to the bottom of the glass, such as creme de cassis or framboise (Chambord is one brand name). Then gently add the sparkling wine. Often, cheap sparkling wine is not very palatable because it is bitter: the strong fruit flavors of the liqueur will mask this.


5

Chaptilization is the addition of sugar, mostly cane sugar but could be other sugars like beet or corn. Chaptilization is only illegal in several countries and one state in the USA. Here is the list Australia, Austria, Germany (for high quality wines), Italy and South Africa. Chaptilization is permitted in only certain areas of France. Those are Bordeaux,...


5

The primary effect a spitoon would have, is less alcohol recpetion (some alcohol will get into the blood via the mouth-mucus). The alcohol could lead to different results for the later wines. You might get a more intense taste of the wine if you could take more of it into your mouth and "wash" with it. Even more if you take a sip, wash, gulp/spit, take ...


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