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29

There are a couple of considerations, although this is far from a complete answer. First, a stronger (higher ABV) beer will tend to cellar better, as the alcohol can act to help prevent oxidization. Second, a beer with less emphasis on hops, and more on malt, yeast, or other characteristics, will be a better candidate, because the qualities that hops ...


12

In short, the main factors in aging is a combination of compounds breaking down and oxidation. IPAs - hop aroma breakdown For IPAs, it's the hop aromas that break down fairly quickly - the aromatic compounds are volatile and break down noticably within a short timeframe: Tom Nielsen, Sierra Nevada’s senior research analyst focused on hop degradation, ...


12

Quite the opposite, bottle conditioned beer is perfect for aging. The yeast carbonates the beer and will produce slight changes over time, like upping the ABV. This needs to be done in climate controlled environments similar to wine. The yeast will settle to bottom and you want to avoid pouring this into your glass when finished. I brewed a Imperial honey ...


12

There are a few types of beers which are (generally) good to age. Strong Beers: like such as barleywines, robust porters, and imperial stouts. It is benefical if a beer is 8-10 percent or stronger, since an elevated alcohol profile will typically become smoother, mellower and more agreeable. That does not mean lower alcohol percentage beers can not be aged, ...


8

DIPAs generally have a high enough ABV (7%+) to age for a few months...but you probably don't want to. Most contemporary IPAs and DIPAs are best drank within 3 weeks from the date of bottling. Stone's "Enjoy By" Series gives you 5 weeks to drink the IPA if properly refrigerated. Super hop-bursted IPAs with a ton of aroma like Heady Topper recommend to ...


8

Not really. In theory, larger bottles mean that the little bit of air trapped at the top of the bottle is smaller compared to the volume of beer than it would be in a standard 12 oz bottle. However, I've been unable to find any research backing this up, and anecdotally it makes no difference. Larger bottles are favored for aging beers mostly for practical ...


8

In addition to Waitkus his answer I would like to note that the perfect time to drink a beer depends on the type, brand and most importantly taste. There is also a difference when storing larger bottles. For instance a 75 cl Duvel bottle (or larger) can be stored easily for several years, whereas the smaller bottles of the same beer don't fair too well. ...


7

Aging or 'Finishing' is an extension of the maturation process, when the spirit is subsequently filled into empty casks that previously held other wines or spirits for a further relatively short period at the end of maturation. The selection of casks can affect the character of the final whisky. Outside of the United States, the most common practice is ...


7

I've been homebrewing and winemaking for almost 25 years and there are 3 reasons why a bottle might explode. Too much sugar for the secondary fermentation in the bottle. Homebrewers do this ALL THE TIME. Turns your beer into little hand-grenades. Sometimes fermentation is not complete and with the normal addition of sugar at bottling can cause problems. ...


7

Due its high alcohol content, you will still be able to drink the sake without worrying about your health. However, the recommended consumption period is usually one year after bottling. After that, the maker cannot guarantee the flavor of the sake. Whatever the flavor of your sake is right now, whether it aged well or went plain ugly, is not the flavor of ...


6

First, we have to understand why we age whiskey in the first place. It's primarily to extract compounds from the wood of the barrels (and any previous contents) so that they can add flavor and complexity to the final product. From there, there are several factors that determine how long a typical aging period might be. If the wood in the barrels is ...


6

Right now I can think about some characteristics of a Sotch, that depend partly on the age: Flavours: The longer a whisky matures in a cask, the stronger is the influence of the cask on the flavours. So the character of a very young whisky largely comes from the distillery. That often means some fresh, fruity flavours, with a significant alcoholic taste. ...


5

Not knowing much about the beer but the 30 second Google search - I will try to give insight as to why this may happen. I've noticed this was a Trappist beer. As such, there is probably as much yeast in there as homebrew beers that have had sugar added to carbonize the beer during the bottling process. When too much sugar is added at this step, the ...


5

I believe the general principal is that lower temperatures will result in slower (or negligible) aging process than warmer temperatures. The results will certainly vary depending on the ABV and other qualities of the beer. Storing bottles horizontally should prevent the corks from drying.


5

In terms of commercial beers, it is hard to say. In general I find that aging tends to allow flavors to meld. If I brew beer and do a brief aging in oak (or add oak chips), the beer usually requires aging to achieve balance. This is most typical with something I sometimes make called ebulon (non-carbonated, fermented malt and elderberries, secondary ...


4

You remember correctly. (http://indianapublicmedia.org/amomentofscience/age-wine-wooden-barrels/) (Tannic acid, a tannin found in oak) Tannins, the chemicals that are transferred from the oak barrels to the wine, are extremely good at forming hydrogen bonds (just look at the structure!), which makes them very soluble in water. Considering that both beer ...


4

Personally I was quite taken with 60, 90, and 120 minute IPAs (thank you DFH) when shelved in cool and dark places for as much as a year. My guess is it would have been good for longer, but tasty beer and curiosity got the best of my experiment. I think Wayne in Yak deserves an up vote I can't yet do thanks to my noob status. Well researched and void of ...


4

Bottle conditioned beers definitely have longer shelf-lives than their pasteurized/filtered counterparts - the yeast helps scavenge oxygen and release sulphites to stop free radicals (such as from lipid breakdown) from staling the beer. The yeast can survive for decades - Guinness observed yeast still alive in the bottle after 35 years! How long a bottle ...


4

Quick answer no. The yeast used should have very little effect on on the expiry date. Things that will affect this more are: Temperature of fermentation Hot side aeration Cold side aeration Pasteurization Filtration Colour of bottle the beer is stored in Type of beer ie % dark malts Live product vs sterile filtered This list is incomplete. This is an ...


4

The barrels are pumped out at the winery. The barrels are probably rinsed with hot water until it's free of the gunk from the wine making process. Then left to drip dry for a while for a few days. If they are going to be used for spirits, the barrel head has to be taken off and then the barrel is charred on the inside. Otherwise, you won't get any of that ...


3

A true Scotch whisky has to be aged at least 5 years to qualify as whisky. Beyond that, the factors that change over time are: colour nose flavour The whisky takes on these from the wood, and from the previous contents. So for a really well rounded whisky, especially for a full bodies peaty, smoky whisky, that age is essential. That said, there are some ...


3

This is an incomplete answer, but I know that there are some smaller bottles of "old ale" beers which are made for aging. In particular, there are several from the UK which are sold in the 200-300mL range, such as Thomas Hardy's. I'm afraid that I can't tell you anything about the effect (or non-effect) of bottle size.


3

Sorry for the late response, but as I look on the internet for discussions concerning this topic I ran across this question. In the mid 1800's in England, IPA's were created and produced for multiple reasons. Long story short, as Europe was going through a technology renaissance period, ingredients used for brewing changed and grains that were converted ...


2

Remember, that not all of the beers are suitable for aging. Mainly porter beer can be stored beyond expiration date (30 years!), but some others too. And i see no point for aging beer in a fridge.


2

I agree with the other answers: IPA's are not really intended to be aged like a barleywine. However, the style was historically brewed to survive the long journey by ship from England to India. So while they might lose some the freshness and hop volatiles over time, you can certainly keep them for many months and they will still be very drinkable. (Assuming, ...


2

I would suggest reading "Vintage Beer: A Taster's Guide to Brews That Improve over Time" by Patrick Dawson. To summarize his findings on what types of beers improve with age they must contain at least one of these three characteristics: High ABV (8% or more) Sour Smoke It goes without saying that if a beer has two or more of these characteristics the odds ...


2

Typically it depends on the style. High ABV beers, such as imperial stouts and barley wines will typically age well while others lower in ABV will go rancid after 3-6 months. Obviously you're not going to want to cellar a Bud Light (it tastes rancid anyway before storing it). But even when speaking of higher quality beers, you're not going to want to cellar ...


2

Aging, from my experience, involves the heavy proteins settling to the bottom of the bottle. Filtered beer typically doesn't need to be aged because all of that is already removed. You can consider this "pre aged" like a shirt may be "pre shrunk". Best not to buy with the assumption that it will get any smaller (or improve with time). Much of the time, ...


2

Being a former winemaker, Cabernet can made in a variety of styles from cheap Trader Joes Cabernet ready to drink the day you buy it, to Napa Valley cabs that won't soften up for at least a decade. In fact, I've had 20 year old cabs that were still so tannic, I don't think they would ever soften up. From a winemaking perspective, usually I found that wines ...


2

Way variable. On the high end even from year to year the same vineyard and same grape will vary how long to hold. When it is released the vineyard and others will have a recommendation. On the shelf at the liquor store is often ready to drink. High end wine that is going to be put up is often bought out before it even hits the shelves. Some wine that ...


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