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8

The likely answer is somewhere between carbonation pressure and marketing. It's hard to find numbers for how much caps can handle vs corks but you should notice that most corked beers also come in bottles with very thick glass, this is because the beer inside is at a higher pressure than most other styles. Most beer styles will fall pretty close to 2.0 ...


6

It depends if you like the smokier/peatier whiskies such as Talisker, or prefer the smoother whiskies. I find the former generally overpriced but that's me. A good example of the latter is Auchentoshan 12 year old. Easy drinking (is that a bad thing?), with no overpowering flavour but flavoursome all around and smooth bite (an oxymoron?) at the end. I saw ...


4

I'll start by saying that what I'm suggesting isn't technically a scotch recommendation, but it is a good tip for whisky, rye, and similar spirits. One of the more underrated genres of whiskey is "Bottled in Bond" type whiskey, bourbon, and rye. I've found that many of these spirits provide excellent value for the money. For example: Old Forester Heaven ...


4

A cap is not going to fly off a bottle unless it is not properly seated, no matter the carbonation. It is crimped onto the bottle. The bottle will first explode. It is also incorrect that a cork is necessary for higher carbonated beers. Many of the styles identified at higher carbonation volumes also come in capped bottles (particularly 375ml bottles). ...


4

Glenmorangie is a 10-year highland single-malt scotch that outperforms its price point (currently $36 at Total Wine), in my opinion.


4

how can I choose between two bottles in a non-arbitrary, and objective way? You can't. It's purely a subjective exercise. It is a dark art that takes a lot of tasting and learning what regions you like and winemakers you like. Even high points from a well known critic aren't a sure bet. If I were you, I would start reading Wine Spectator and Wine Advocate ...


3

Let's start with what are Nomex corks and what are natural corks. Nomex is a registered trademark for flame-resistant meta-aramid material developed in the early 1960s by DuPont and first marketed in 1967. Nomex and related aramid polymers are related to nylon, but have aromatic backbones, and hence are more rigid and more durable. Nomex is the ...


3

Certainly as many goods there is diminishing return. Wines between $10 - $20 is a narrow range. If you are happy in that range then no reason to get outside that range. I find many wines under $10 I consider drinkable. Under $10 you will also get more variation from bottle to bottle. They are often just buying grapes in bulk. There are many wines ...


3

I can answer this... once you get above about $20 a bottle is not proportional to the value you get out of it. The flavors/tastes simply don't give you the value above that range. A $100 or $1000 bottle of wine starts to get into veblen goods territory. Production costs simply stop contributing to the price on the self above this point. I've tasted several ...


2

I drink my Scotch neat -- too peaty/smokey and I gotta use an ice cube. Johnnie Walker Black is my go-to (~$74/1.75L at Costco in WA state). Picked up some Kirkland Signature 16-year Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky this evening (~$62/750mL in WA state) and it is very nice. :) The Balvenie Doublewood is probably my favorite, but it ain't cheap -- and ...


2

I cannot speak for the canadian market, as i do not live here, but in France we have quite a large choice, and were bottle rank from 5€ to 200€ in a good wine shop. Assuming there is little return threshold on wine above $20 is, in my humble opinion, a mistake. Because you don't drink a price, but a work. And good work is never cheap. I'm not talking about ...


1

Yes and No. Expensive wines are generally bottled in more expensive packaging because there is a greater profit margin and winemakers want to exude an air of exclusivity and expense. The unfortunately part is usually you can't see the cork because of the foil and the dark color of the bottle. But, if you could visually inspect the cork before you open the ...


1

Not a very fair question. Not all scotches are equal in flavor profile so comparing Lagavulin to glenlivet at any price is meaningless! Also, taste is personal. I cannot convince some folks that Lagavulin is worth drinking but to me it is man's greatest creation! That said I was very disappointed in balvenie tun 1509 (don't recall the batch). For the ...


1

Balvenie Doublewood is CHEAP and harsh, unless you get the 17 year but still harsh. If you want a REAL Single Malt Scotch that is not many 100's or 1000's of dollars try the Balvenie 21 Year Portwood. It is NOT harsh, it is 96 proof, smoothest stuff I have ever had!!! It is a lot more than the Doublewood though, about $150 for 750ml but if you can at least ...


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