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22

You don't need to know what something is to use it effectively. Though yeast was only identified as a microorganism recently, it has been known as the cause of fermentation for many centuries. It's easy to underestimate how sophisticated people throughout history were. Before yeast was monocultured in labs it was actively cultured by brewers. They would ...


10

Belgian Lambics are probably the most notable beers brewed with wild yeast. They are fermented in open vats, and wild yeast strains specific to the area contribute a very distinctive flavor to these beers. Lindeman's is probably the best known commerical example in the US, although these beers are sweetened and are not usually considered a true example of ...


9

A proper hefeweizen is an unfiltered beer. The yeast and other sediment that would be filtered out for other brews is left in. These particles tend to accumulate on the bottom of the bottle during storage. By swirling the the beer in the bottle you're suspending that yeast and sediment so it can be poured into your glass. This is what gives hefeweizens ...


8

It depends on how much sugar is present in the bottled beer. If the beer is bottle-conditioned, a small amount of sugar is added deliberately in order to carbonate the beer. Once the yeast have eaten all the sugar, they stop producing carbon dioxide and fall to the bottom of the bottle. This is not physiologically harmful in any way, but the beer might need ...


5

Vinometers don't work on beer or wine with residual sugars. You need to use a hydrometer. Vinometers only works with dry wine.


4

Quick answer no. The yeast used should have very little effect on on the expiry date. Things that will affect this more are: Temperature of fermentation Hot side aeration Cold side aeration Pasteurization Filtration Colour of bottle the beer is stored in Type of beer ie % dark malts Live product vs sterile filtered This list is incomplete. This is an ...


4

The yeast have most likely stopped fermenting by the time you get the bottle, considering it's probably at least a 5 days old by that point. The yeast stop when the fermentable sugars have been consumed. This doesn't mean they consume all sugars in the beer, but rather just those that are fermentable. Most beer has both fermentable and unfermentable sugars....


3

I think this homebrew post has a good explanation of how brewers keep yeast strains. Homebrew yeast discussion White labs from San Diego also has a great slide about how they do it. White labs is the company just finished the study of the yeast domestication tree, where they analyzed the DNA of several yeast used in fermentation and determined how they are ...


3

It's difficult to answer why fermentation did not complete without further information. It's quite possible the sugar content was too high and pH to low for whatever yeast was added to survive and begin fermentation. Vinegar however is created when bacteria that produce acetic acid are present in an environment with a sugar source and oxygen. They will ...


3

There are many plants where yeast grows in symbiotic mutuality. Take fresh dark grapes - the slight white "sediment" on the surface is natural yeast, and you won't find grapes without it. Another such plant is barley. Normally, the yeast only appears on the seeds, in relatively small amounts. Malting creates optimal environment for the yeast growth though, ...


3

Actually, there are still people who brew the same way people did before the discovery of yeast, so we have a pretty good idea how it worked. There are also data from early 20-th century ethnological surveys where brewers describe their methods. Some of the equipment used for yeast transfer is still in use, or in ethnological museums. People usually didn't ...


2

Short answer; you get a lot of the flavour from the yeast, you can get a fairly big difference by varying the yeast in your recipe. For example, a Saison and a Pale ale have similar ingredients, but taste quite different, a Saison yeast imparts a considerable amount of flavour... likewise if you use a lager yeast, and properly lager your beer, you can get a ...


2

Here's a good link regarding yeast, now this article is talking about candida but can likely apply to other strains of yeast http://www.needs.com/product/NDNL-0704-01/a_Probiotics In a nut shell, a definite answer is not always easy to come by in medicine since many factors can give different results. Anything from the make up of your intestinal flora, ...


2

There are really two questions here. 1) How do breweries keep the yeast they have from evolving over time 2) How to breweries keep a consistent flavor over time I'll answer the second one first... As to how do they keep the flavor the same all the time, year after year even though ingredients taste different from year to year? It's all about blending. ...


2

Macrobreweries such as Budweiser brew several gigantic vats at a time, and they blend the various vats' products to create a consistent product. They have a board of tasters at each factory to taste the batch and recommend what to blend to get the proper flavor. I know it's funny to think of Budweiser as having that kind of quality control, but they do have ...


2

Bread yeast is very close to brewers yeast. There is a mead recipe you can search-up: "Joes ancient orange mead", which does specify using bread yeast, rather than specific mead yeast. Many home brewers make this with good levels of success. Failing that, you can grow naturally-occurring yeast from the skins of fresh and dried fruits (e.g.: grapes). We ...


2

This discussion would be more suitable in the homebrew stack as Andrew said, but I will answer it anyway. You are on the right track, making a simple pilsner recipe will show you the effects of the malt, yeast, water and hops. There is a technique called SMASH (single malt, single hops), which is widely used to "test" the effect of a new ingredient. It is ...


2

I will try to answer your questions to the best of my ability. Your description of your earlier wine makes me question you: Have you used a hydrometer to calculate the alcohol percentage of your earlier wines? If your wine tasted sweet after fermentation, it means your wine wasn't finished fermenting. If you bottle the wine and let it stay in room ...


1

There are specific steps to restarting a stuck wine/mead/high gravity beer. You can read the whole procedure here. You'll need some champagne yeast or some other special yeast used to restart stuck fermentations. But it starts with this: For restarting 5 or 6 gallons, take a quart jar and fill it half way with the wine in question. Add to that, water ...


1

Some sugars won't start a fermentation with brewer's yeast at all, such a lactose. In such case, sooner or later other organisms would take over (e.g. lactobacteria). Any sugars that can be fermented, would ferment at different speeds. As there is usually more than one kind of sugar present, the easy ones ferment first until the alcohol kills off the yeast, ...


1

Well, people at the craft beer industry just doesn't have limits, so, guess what? They are doing primary fermentation with Brettanomyces for many styles, including popular ones, like IPAs (look for brett ipa on Google). I don't know very specific details about the strains used for it, but I do know there are a few ones in the market right know. Probably some ...


1

Our bodies are ecosystems as much as they are machines. We have a wide variety of microbes in our intestines and even if the yeast is not the culprit something else could be encouraged to grow. I tend to suspect this is the real problem for the entirely unscientific reason that I have never noticed pasteurization to affect whether I am bloated after ...


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