5

This really depends on the drink itself. Some wines are meant to keep for years. Others should be drunk immediately. Most should be drunk within 1 or 2 years. So choose your wine carefully. There are various vintage wine guides online. That said, once you have chosen a wine meant for ageing, you do want a cellar (or if that is not available, a refrigerator ...


3

I did a deep dive into Stack Exchange because I thought this question would've been asked before! But, it has not. That doesn't mean that the answer isn't super easy to find. First of all, not all wines are meant to be aged. The vast majority of wines are meant to consume when you pick them up at the store. How can you tell which are which? Mainly on price ...


2

I will try to answer your questions to the best of my ability. Your description of your earlier wine makes me question you: Have you used a hydrometer to calculate the alcohol percentage of your earlier wines? If your wine tasted sweet after fermentation, it means your wine wasn't finished fermenting. If you bottle the wine and let it stay in room ...


2

Yes, pretty much any old wine, if it hasn't already turned into vinegar, can be made into vinegar. The best is to start with clean wine, but if it already tastes kind of funky just push it towards the final goal of becoming vinegar. You can let this happen naturally, or you can buy vinegar "mother".


2

What are some of the possible iconic champagnes from each decade of the last 100 years? Before going on, I would like to define the word iconic which I would like to use as a loose model in the following list of iconic champagnes. Iconic Similar to "classic," iconic is generally restricted to more recent, highly original, influential, or unique, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible