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Are all lambrusco cheap? The short answer is no. The most highly rated of its wines are the frizzante (slightly sparkling) red wines, designed to be drunk young. Aged wines are generally not an issue here and generally speaking are on the more inexpensive price range. But this is not absolute. It does have some historical value to its name also. ...


4

Your question seems to be based on a false assumption. Rose is not a "mix" of red and white wine. Red wine is produced by (red) grapes which have their skins left on during fermentation, white wine is produced from pealed grapes (of any colour). Rose is produced by extracting the skins (or red grapes) at some point in the fermentation process. It's a ...


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Ken Graham's answer is excellent. I will say that when I visited Provence, I found just about every rose delicious. In general, everyday Cote de Provence rose is less expensive than Tavel rose. So I might suggest starting with a Cote de Provence rose and graduate to a Tavel.


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Looking for a Rosé recommendation? The ultimate recommendation would involve that particular variety of Rosé you may be interested in. Having lived many years in France and having drank wine on a very regular bases while overseas, I would like to recommend the Tavel Rosé. There is just something awesome about wine made from grapes in the Rhone Valley! Tavel ...


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-**1.** Use a Screw (the longer the better), a screwdriver, and a hammer. Wrap a small towel around top of bottle and screw. Pry slowly and cautiously the screw out with claw hammer, just like pulling a nail. -**2.** Push the cork in with the handle of a wooden spoon, or any blunt object similar in size. -**3.** Pump it out. Start with a bike pump and ...


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I'm sure the "Ancients" drank grape juice. It was probably a delicious treat when it was in season when the grapes were ripe in the Fall. I love drinking the juice from my wine grapes, it's very good! But, without filtration or sulfites, there was no way to store grape juice without spontaneous fermentation, even after boiling it. Eventually something would ...


2

Probably what you are smelling is a combination of oxidized wine, ethyl acetate and acetic acid. Oxidized wine smells like sherry and the volatile acidity smells exactly like you described it. Vinegar. Ethyl Acetate smells like nail polish remover. What happens when you leave wine out, the metabisulfites break down and can't prevent oxidation anymore and ...


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I too and trying to recreate this at the moment. I have seen completely contradictory descriptions of Pramnian wine. Some very sweet like the Eszencia or Tokaji style made from dried grapes. The Greek study tool online from Tufts defines Pramnian as "raisin-wine" which is too interpretive since other descriptions are are of a dark, dry, strong ...


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Software Engineer here (with experience in the liquor industry)... So, this is a bit of a tricky question to answer and entirely depends on what kind of data you're looking to extract. There's a lot of different data that could be extracted from different resources. Item name Barcode Price Size Description Tasting notes Region (it was created) Alcohol ...


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So a wine that advertises itself as vegan or vegetarian used an alternative to fining agent? That's true. There are alternatives to the use animal products for fining. Examples are clay, silica and vegetable plaque. Do some vegan wines simply skip the fining phase, or do all wines go through fining? There are a lot of wine makers that prefer not to fine ...


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Amarone and Valpoliccella Ripasso from Italy are your safest bet. Any wine that’s made with dried grapes (appassimento) will hold some sweetness without moving into the category of dessert wine or fortified (port). These wines should be readily available through the world and may other countries are producing appassimento styles, one I am familiar with is ...


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wiki says: The method of pasteurizing grape juice to halt the fermentation has been attributed to an American physician and dentist, Thomas Bramwell Welch in 1869. A strong supporter of the temperance movement, he produced a non-alcoholic wine to be used for church services in his hometown of Vineland, New Jersey. Of course, simple grape juice, that you'...


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DO NOT risk the alcohol! Push cork slowly into bottle. Use a nail or something metal not a stick. A stick risks the alcohol!


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A technique that is rarely thought of is to simply push the cork slowly down into the bottle (like with the end of a fork or with a stick,) instead of attempting to pull the cork out of the bottle. (Sometimes this cannot be done safely, however, considering that pushing the cork down into the bottle MAY create more pressure within the bottle and cause it to ...


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