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29

tl;dr Tapping the top causes compression waves started through the air in the opening (which is why it only works from the top.) The compression waves bounce at the bottom and become expansion waves. The compression and expansion causes agitation which foams up the beer. Tell me more... The layman's summary from Scientists discover why beer bottles ...


14

Fully attributing the Berghoff Beer Blog for this interesting story (emphasis mine), Around World War II, brown glass rose in demand and many companies had to forfeit their brown glass for their country. Unfortunately that meant companies with higher quality beers had to use clear glass, which made their beers look like cheaper, clear glass beers. Higher ...


9

You can decant the beer between two large glasses or pitchers - the agitation will cause the CO2 to come out of solution quickly and also not raise the temperature too much. Sample after 4-5 decants to see how much the carbonation has dropped, and repeat as necessary. You will end up with quite a bit of foam, hence the need for larger glasses or a pitcher.


8

Not really. In theory, larger bottles mean that the little bit of air trapped at the top of the bottle is smaller compared to the volume of beer than it would be in a standard 12 oz bottle. However, I've been unable to find any research backing this up, and anecdotally it makes no difference. Larger bottles are favored for aging beers mostly for practical ...


8

How long do you leave them in the fridge before you open them? Making sure they've had a good several hours to chill may mitigate the explosion. You could also try a homebrewer's trick, which is to chill them really cold, pop the caps all off then put new caps on. You would need a bottle capper to do this. They're fairly cheap but you probably wouldn't ...


7

The cage is simply twisted closed. You'll see that bottom wire is twisted tight and bent upwards. Simply bend it back down to horizontal, and untwist to loosen the cage. At that point you'll be able to lift the cage free, and un-cork by hand. It's been a year or two since I've had a bottle of Delirium Tremens, so I don't remember how tight the cork was,...


7

Glass vs bottle or can will be a pretty noticeable difference with most styles of beer simply due to the size of the opening. When you pour from the storage vessel to the glass you disturb the beer a lot which drives CO2 gas out, and that takes a lot of aromatics with it so the aroma you get from the beer in a glass is WAY stronger and more complex than ...


7

Why are wine bottle volumes in centiliters not in liters or milliliters? Part of the answer is in the marketing system used in a particular country or region and part of it would be about the size of bottle being purchased. In Canada and the USA, in a standard bottle of wine, there are 750 millilitres (ml), 75 centilitres (cl) or 0.75 litres (l). Wine ...


7

Draft beer does not give you a hangover, headache, or any kind of sickness just because it is a draft beer. If you’ve ever felt sick after drinking draft beer, you either: Had too much Drank from a dirty tap.


5

No for the cans; maybe for the contents. While it's hard to predict the future, we can infer from the past. As it stands, beer cans as old as 40 years are pretty much worthless (with a few exceptions). This is because right around the mid 70s, beer can collection as an activity exploded. Beer cans before that point became valuable, but beer cans from ...


5

Certain wavelengths of light are responsible for skunking beer. I believe these are mostly in the blue and ultraviolet parts of the spectrum. Brown bottles do the best at blocking out the UV rays. This is why you can get an occasional Rolling Rock that tastes off. I've never heard of a UV reflective coating before, but it makes sense. What follows is ...


4

I would expect that companies which use clear bottles don't expect their product to see that much sunlight, or that they think their customers won't notice a little skunking if it does see any. Anecdotally, I typically associate clear bottles with the larger brewers (Coors, Budweiser), and I don't think of those beers as having much in the way of hops, the ...


3

Almost anything can be used to open a bottle of beer. What we used as university students: spoon (fork, knife), key, table, park bank, fence, another bottle of beer. My preferred way (when there's no bottle opener) is to use a spoon (I hold the spoon differently but this way is alos worth consideration): Usng another (closed) bottle: If you are outside ...


3

Found what I was looking for: WESTMARK 3 Flaschenverschlüsse, Flaschenstöpsel mit Hebel und Gummidichtung, 40 x 60 x 15 mm, farblich sortiert. Now I only need to order a box of these.


3

I cannot recall delirium ever being packaged in a strange way the site (in dutch) also only shows Deliria packaged the way you describe. In either way i think they should be opened like a bottle of champagne, open the metal wire casing twist the cork out (or push it with your thumb) and it's often advised to wrap your hand around the neck of the bottle which ...


3

Over-carbonation is typically a sign of infection, which is certainly a possibility. It's not a problem I've had with Hitachino, but at their price point I don't drink them often


3

The process is a bit different in freely moving bottles when compared to bottles on a solid surface. Bottles that can't move only foam a little bit, where the hitting bottle foams as much as the hit bottle. Bottles that can move (even 1 mm is enough) move down faster than the beer. This creates a lower pressure inside the bottle. Beer can hold a lot less ...


3

This is an incomplete answer, but I know that there are some smaller bottles of "old ale" beers which are made for aging. In particular, there are several from the UK which are sold in the 200-300mL range, such as Thomas Hardy's. I'm afraid that I can't tell you anything about the effect (or non-effect) of bottle size.


2

Not likely, unless there are some rare beers in there that benefit from aging and are kept in the right conditions. Most beers will oxidize over time, even with a sealed cork or cap a minute amount of oxygen can permeate the seal, over the course of 20 years this could damage the beer. Some companies may wax dip their beers as well, in many cases wax ...


2

Because you end up drinking more of it ;-)


2

The most common method that I have seen and used is "ye ol' lighter trick." With which, one uses the butt of an igniting lighter as a lever and one's own finger as the fulcrum. Technique is important with this one because one can really cut/scratch up one's knuckles if this is done improperly. Depicted here: https://youtu.be/fvlrRjNVaqg Another nifty ...


2

They are not. I looked through my collection of wine labels (about 50 from around the globe) - many of them are 0,75l, many are 75cl and some are 750ml. I couldn't determine any dependence of volume unit on country or region or type of the wine.


1

A technique that is rarely thought of is to simply push the cork slowly down into the bottle (like with the end of a fork or with a stick,) instead of attempting to pull the cork out of the bottle. (Sometimes this cannot be done safely, however, considering that pushing the cork down into the bottle MAY create more pressure within the bottle and cause it to ...


1

Copied from: Why is 75cl the standard wine bottle size? The volume of 75cl was standardized in the 19th century. At that time, the biggest clients for the French wines were the British. The close neighbors do not use the metric system and used to order wine in “imperial gallon”. One gallon is about 4.546 liters. Barrels were used to ...


1

The short answer is - "It depends, probably not". Bottles are usually rated for Volumes of CO2. Champagne bottles are typically rated for 7 volumes. Wheat beer bottles should take around 5 volumes. Ales/Lager beers are normally carbonated at 2-3 volumes. However, flip-top bottles (I assume you mean the ones with the rubber seal) are produced in both CO2-...


1

Any alcoholic drink will cause a hangouver if you drink too much. Bottled beer and draft beer are basically the same product, they should produce the same hangover. But it's easier to drink too much of draft beer as they are typically served in larger volumes. The exception are darker beverages (like wine and cognac), they produce worse hangovers because ...


1

No. They are not sufficient, but are one of several necessary conditions to keep beer from going bad. In general, keep beer at a cool temperature (50-60 degrees), away from light, and stand the bottle up (do not lie them sideways like wine bottles are stored). Brown bottles help keep beer away from light, but as a rule of them, store your beer someplace dark....


1

I think for short term storage it shouldn't be a problem. It sounds like you're just keeping the bottles in the cupboard outside their cardboard carriers? You could always use the carriers or keep most in carriers in the back and single bottles in the front if you enjoy the appearance of the bottles. Samuel Adams' carriers are taller for the exact reason of ...


1

Go to the store and get Bitburger german pilsner in a can, and in a bottle. Tell me if you taste a difference. I tried that and the canned stuff is a heck of a lot better tasting than the skunked stuff in the brown glass bottle.


1

I just went through four Hitachinos, and I can say for sure - they are solidly carbonated, but nothing I would call undrinkable. I've definitely had - and enjoyed - more carbonated beers. I've also had them before (bottle and poured at a bar) and never had the overcarbonation problem you describe.


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