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There are a couple of considerations, although this is far from a complete answer. First, a stronger (higher ABV) beer will tend to cellar better, as the alcohol can act to help prevent oxidization. Second, a beer with less emphasis on hops, and more on malt, yeast, or other characteristics, will be a better candidate, because the qualities that hops ...


12

Quite the opposite, bottle conditioned beer is perfect for aging. The yeast carbonates the beer and will produce slight changes over time, like upping the ABV. This needs to be done in climate controlled environments similar to wine. The yeast will settle to bottom and you want to avoid pouring this into your glass when finished. I brewed a Imperial honey ...


12

There are a few types of beers which are (generally) good to age. Strong Beers: like such as barleywines, robust porters, and imperial stouts. It is benefical if a beer is 8-10 percent or stronger, since an elevated alcohol profile will typically become smoother, mellower and more agreeable. That does not mean lower alcohol percentage beers can not be aged, ...


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Unfortunately, I don't know the source of this image—a Google reverse image search reveals only a single webpage which itself attributes the image to Google searching.


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When pouring a beer with sediment, or lees, make sure your glass is of a size to accommodate the full contents of the bottle plus the attendant foam. Pour smoothly into the glass, watching the neck of the bottle, and suspend pouring when you see sediment starting to come to the neck. If you haven’t screwed it up, you have a glass of clear, inviting beer. ...


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In addition to Waitkus his answer I would like to note that the perfect time to drink a beer depends on the type, brand and most importantly taste. There is also a difference when storing larger bottles. For instance a 75 cl Duvel bottle (or larger) can be stored easily for several years, whereas the smaller bottles of the same beer don't fair too well. ...


5

In terms of commercial beers, it is hard to say. In general I find that aging tends to allow flavors to meld. If I brew beer and do a brief aging in oak (or add oak chips), the beer usually requires aging to achieve balance. This is most typical with something I sometimes make called ebulon (non-carbonated, fermented malt and elderberries, secondary ...


4

You'll probably do best keeping the room layout simple and as easily organized as possible. The main thing for the beer is to keep the temperature steady and relatively low (around 50F) and keep light out. Even with brown bottles there's still some UV penetration, which you want none of. So keep it dark when you're not in there and try to avoid florescent ...


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Personally I was quite taken with 60, 90, and 120 minute IPAs (thank you DFH) when shelved in cool and dark places for as much as a year. My guess is it would have been good for longer, but tasty beer and curiosity got the best of my experiment. I think Wayne in Yak deserves an up vote I can't yet do thanks to my noob status. Well researched and void of ...


4

Bottle conditioned beers definitely have longer shelf-lives than their pasteurized/filtered counterparts - the yeast helps scavenge oxygen and release sulphites to stop free radicals (such as from lipid breakdown) from staling the beer. The yeast can survive for decades - Guinness observed yeast still alive in the bottle after 35 years! How long a bottle ...


3

One possible consequence is that the bottle will pop, sending gira all over the place and possibly hurting someone's eardrums. I don't know if opening the bottle before it bursts helps or, on the contrary, ensures that it bursts in someone's hands. An in the end, you don’t get to know what it tastes like. :’(


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Typically it depends on the style. High ABV beers, such as imperial stouts and barley wines will typically age well while others lower in ABV will go rancid after 3-6 months. Obviously you're not going to want to cellar a Bud Light (it tastes rancid anyway before storing it). But even when speaking of higher quality beers, you're not going to want to cellar ...


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I would suggest reading "Vintage Beer: A Taster's Guide to Brews That Improve over Time" by Patrick Dawson. To summarize his findings on what types of beers improve with age they must contain at least one of these three characteristics: High ABV (8% or more) Sour Smoke It goes without saying that if a beer has two or more of these characteristics the odds ...


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The short answer is - "It depends, probably not". Bottles are usually rated for Volumes of CO2. Champagne bottles are typically rated for 7 volumes. Wheat beer bottles should take around 5 volumes. Ales/Lager beers are normally carbonated at 2-3 volumes. However, flip-top bottles (I assume you mean the ones with the rubber seal) are produced in both CO2-...


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