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30

There are a couple of considerations, although this is far from a complete answer. First, a stronger (higher ABV) beer will tend to cellar better, as the alcohol can act to help prevent oxidization. Second, a beer with less emphasis on hops, and more on malt, yeast, or other characteristics, will be a better candidate, because the qualities that hops ...


13

There are a few types of beers which are (generally) good to age. Strong Beers: like such as barleywines, robust porters, and imperial stouts. It is benefical if a beer is 8-10 percent or stronger, since an elevated alcohol profile will typically become smoother, mellower and more agreeable. That does not mean lower alcohol percentage beers can not be aged, ...


10

The Life of Wine (after opening) The short answer is approximately 3-5 days, but it all depends on the type of wine. There are a number of factors at play when it comes to the life of wine, after it has been opened. These include acetic acid bacteria that consumes the alcohol in wine and metabolizes it into acetic acid and acetaldehyde. This causes the ...


9

You can decant the beer between two large glasses or pitchers - the agitation will cause the CO2 to come out of solution quickly and also not raise the temperature too much. Sample after 4-5 decants to see how much the carbonation has dropped, and repeat as necessary. You will end up with quite a bit of foam, hence the need for larger glasses or a pitcher.


8

How long do you leave them in the fridge before you open them? Making sure they've had a good several hours to chill may mitigate the explosion. You could also try a homebrewer's trick, which is to chill them really cold, pop the caps all off then put new caps on. You would need a bottle capper to do this. They're fairly cheap but you probably wouldn't ...


8

It depends on how much sugar is present in the bottled beer. If the beer is bottle-conditioned, a small amount of sugar is added deliberately in order to carbonate the beer. Once the yeast have eaten all the sugar, they stop producing carbon dioxide and fall to the bottom of the bottle. This is not physiologically harmful in any way, but the beer might need ...


5

In terms of commercial beers, it is hard to say. In general I find that aging tends to allow flavors to meld. If I brew beer and do a brief aging in oak (or add oak chips), the beer usually requires aging to achieve balance. This is most typical with something I sometimes make called ebulon (non-carbonated, fermented malt and elderberries, secondary ...


4

Avoiding agitating the beer and reducing the temperature are the two key ways to slow down the rate of staling, but really once there's air in the beer it's just a matter of time before it goes bad. Have you considered using a small CO2 charger like this - This uses small CO2 cartridges to push the beer. The advantage being that the keg won't stale ...


4

Personally I was quite taken with 60, 90, and 120 minute IPAs (thank you DFH) when shelved in cool and dark places for as much as a year. My guess is it would have been good for longer, but tasty beer and curiosity got the best of my experiment. I think Wayne in Yak deserves an up vote I can't yet do thanks to my noob status. Well researched and void of ...


4

TLDR answer: Unfornately, no. From my own experience, this varies a lot from company to company. It also depends on country's legislation or even the state, when it comes to USA. As far as I know, expiring dates for beers are even not obligatory by law in many american states. Besides that, some breweries inform the bottling date, others the expiration ...


4

The yeast have most likely stopped fermenting by the time you get the bottle, considering it's probably at least a 5 days old by that point. The yeast stop when the fermentable sugars have been consumed. This doesn't mean they consume all sugars in the beer, but rather just those that are fermentable. Most beer has both fermentable and unfermentable sugars....


3

Over-carbonation is typically a sign of infection, which is certainly a possibility. It's not a problem I've had with Hitachino, but at their price point I don't drink them often


3

Unfortunately, there's not much one can do, at least using only household products. While filling, using a counterpressure bottle filler would maximize the longevity of the beer as well as filling the beer while it's very cold, near its freezing point ~29 degrees F (so that its CO2 is maximally dissolved), if you have a choice in the matter (likely not). ...


2

I prefer DrinkGAS. It's a good solution for a party, I use it in my restaurants.


2

Because CO2 has a significantly higher affinity for water (and therefore beer), than O2 or N2 (the other major components in air) under normal keg conditions (pressure and temperature), I think it's worth a shot: If you take off the air pump and start charging it with CO2, and then pump a good bit of beer/foam out of it (to rid it of some of the air), you ...


2

I would suggest reading "Vintage Beer: A Taster's Guide to Brews That Improve over Time" by Patrick Dawson. To summarize his findings on what types of beers improve with age they must contain at least one of these three characteristics: High ABV (8% or more) Sour Smoke It goes without saying that if a beer has two or more of these characteristics the odds ...


2

Typically it depends on the style. High ABV beers, such as imperial stouts and barley wines will typically age well while others lower in ABV will go rancid after 3-6 months. Obviously you're not going to want to cellar a Bud Light (it tastes rancid anyway before storing it). But even when speaking of higher quality beers, you're not going to want to cellar ...


1

I just went through four Hitachinos, and I can say for sure - they are solidly carbonated, but nothing I would call undrinkable. I've definitely had - and enjoyed - more carbonated beers. I've also had them before (bottle and poured at a bar) and never had the overcarbonation problem you describe.


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