14

Fully attributing the Berghoff Beer Blog for this interesting story (emphasis mine), Around World War II, brown glass rose in demand and many companies had to forfeit their brown glass for their country. Unfortunately that meant companies with higher quality beers had to use clear glass, which made their beers look like cheaper, clear glass beers. Higher ...


10

Skunking is a stage in a beer's life in which it goes rancid. It may smell funny, almost like a skunk, and taste bad. As John pointed out, it is generally caused by excess exposure to light. Beers packaged in clear (Corona and Land Shark for instance) or green bottles are particularly susceptible to this. It is best to avoid these kinds of beers to avoid the ...


5

Certain wavelengths of light are responsible for skunking beer. I believe these are mostly in the blue and ultraviolet parts of the spectrum. Brown bottles do the best at blocking out the UV rays. This is why you can get an occasional Rolling Rock that tastes off. I've never heard of a UV reflective coating before, but it makes sense. What follows is ...


4

I would expect that companies which use clear bottles don't expect their product to see that much sunlight, or that they think their customers won't notice a little skunking if it does see any. Anecdotally, I typically associate clear bottles with the larger brewers (Coors, Budweiser), and I don't think of those beers as having much in the way of hops, the ...


3

Some of the mocelues in the beer are broken down by ultraviolet light and bind to sulfur atoms. This causes Skunking. This is why some bottle six packs have a tall sleeve and beer keeps longer in a darker colored bottle. A common misperception is warming and cooling over and over again causes Skunking.


1

No. They are not sufficient, but are one of several necessary conditions to keep beer from going bad. In general, keep beer at a cool temperature (50-60 degrees), away from light, and stand the bottle up (do not lie them sideways like wine bottles are stored). Brown bottles help keep beer away from light, but as a rule of them, store your beer someplace dark....


1

I think for short term storage it shouldn't be a problem. It sounds like you're just keeping the bottles in the cupboard outside their cardboard carriers? You could always use the carriers or keep most in carriers in the back and single bottles in the front if you enjoy the appearance of the bottles. Samuel Adams' carriers are taller for the exact reason of ...


1

Go to the store and get Bitburger german pilsner in a can, and in a bottle. Tell me if you taste a difference. I tried that and the canned stuff is a heck of a lot better tasting than the skunked stuff in the brown glass bottle.


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