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5

If you are using honey, water and yeast. Then the answer is NO. But alcohol is a poisonous substance if not used properly. You cannot make it strong enough to "poison" you in the traditional sense. Could you poison yourself by drinking too much of it, sure it's possible. But, there are no by-products from the fermentation process that would "poison" you. ...


4

Generally speaking, your mead is fine if you haven't opened it. Normally, commercial meaderies bottle in dark bottles (or something other than clear) which keep out the UV light. I doubt that the temperature was much of an issue. You should be able to chill your mead and enjoy it. FWIW, I'd drink it out of a wine glass made for white wine rather than the ...


2

Bread yeast is very close to brewers yeast. There is a mead recipe you can search-up: "Joes ancient orange mead", which does specify using bread yeast, rather than specific mead yeast. Many home brewers make this with good levels of success. Failing that, you can grow naturally-occurring yeast from the skins of fresh and dried fruits (e.g.: grapes). We ...


2

One of the biggest determinants in how well a mead or beer or wine will age is oxidation. The only time that oxygen is beneficial is when your must or wort (IDK the currect term for unfermented mead) has cooled and you are ready to pitch the yeast. Oxygen at this point will help the yeast to multiply. But when the liquid is hot prior to cooling, and after ...


2

Aging mead is perfectly acceptable. The biggest risk you have is that it will be oxidized and that some of the flavors could become muted. For example, in my homebrewed meads spices like anise will go away after a year. If you have a traditional straight mead that may not be an issue. I would assume professionally bottled mead would have minimal oxygen to ...


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If you want to make a small amount of mead, you can follow those directions, but you will need modern equipment. A carboy and an airlock is basically all you need. Actually, you will probably need two. One to ferment and one to age the mead. Mead is pretty simple to make. Water, honey and some yeast. Most people get filtered water. Then boil it with the ...


1

I had to look up Chouchen as I'd never heard of it before (see, after many years still learning!) It looks like it's a form of mead made out of Buckwheat honey which gives it that dark color and probably stronger flavor. According to the article, it was originally made out of cider and honey but it looks like both versions are called Chouchen now. I looked ...


1

Unless you used unsafe water or honey, it is safe to drink at any time. The alcohol in the mead effectively keeps it safe for consumption. The fact that it smells good is a good sign and even with some off-flavours everything should be on the safe side. Pungent smells, mould and no alcohol at all, however, are signs that something is wrong. Generally, ...


1

The short answer is - "It depends, probably not". Bottles are usually rated for Volumes of CO2. Champagne bottles are typically rated for 7 volumes. Wheat beer bottles should take around 5 volumes. Ales/Lager beers are normally carbonated at 2-3 volumes. However, flip-top bottles (I assume you mean the ones with the rubber seal) are produced in both CO2-...


1

Let me see if I can answer your questions. I have years of experience with making beer, wine and mead... No, leave the apples alone until fermentation is done. No, the alcohol will stop any rotting. Your mead might be spoiled from another source of contamination (remember good sanitation) but as long as there is alcohol the apples won't rot. It is advisable ...


1

Mead hates sunlight. This is especially true for those made with some types or honey and fruit. It’s often The technical term in the wine industry is “light strike” beer people would know it as “skunking”. Again this will depend a bit on the mead as tannins (which most mead has very little of ) tends to protect it- but I’ve found even a week in bright ...


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My experience is that mead tends to go flat rather quickly after opening. I do not know how long the average bottle of mead stays in good condition before being opened, but some of the mead we drank from some of our local meaderies has been flat when being opened (all use clear bottles), but the fact that we stored the mead in our pantry tells us that the ...


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Even though you think this is a issue with certain types of mead during aging, I can't help but think you are just dealing with contamination that is turning some batches foul. I've never read of any type of mead that WORSENS with proper aging. So either you just don't like dry mead (maybe try carbonating it?) or you have contamination ruining your mead ...


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