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9

Sodastream: maybe, but at your own risk. According to Sodastream's FAQ, "You risk damaging your soda maker, not to mention making a big fizzy mess!". However, there are a few articles discussing how to carbonate non-water with one. Anecdotes vary: It overpressurized and sprayed beer everywhere It worked fine, but go slow Wild success! Some tips: It ...


9

You can decant the beer between two large glasses or pitchers - the agitation will cause the CO2 to come out of solution quickly and also not raise the temperature too much. Sample after 4-5 decants to see how much the carbonation has dropped, and repeat as necessary. You will end up with quite a bit of foam, hence the need for larger glasses or a pitcher.


8

How long do you leave them in the fridge before you open them? Making sure they've had a good several hours to chill may mitigate the explosion. You could also try a homebrewer's trick, which is to chill them really cold, pop the caps all off then put new caps on. You would need a bottle capper to do this. They're fairly cheap but you probably wouldn't ...


6

There are two main ways to carbonate beer. Force carbonation - This is where CO2 is forced into the fermented beer. Because of the pressure (and the temperature at which it is done) the CO2 will dissolve into the beer solution. The fizz that happens when you open a beer is the CO2 coming out of solution. (Technically you can re-carbonate flat beer!) ...


5

Add sugar to bottle-conditioned beer Warning: This method is error-prone, high-effort, and probably not worth your time. Could be fun, though. :) Most commercial beer is force-carbonated. That is to say, the beer is produced and ready to drink (minus the fizz) before they put it in the bottle and mechanically carbonate the beer. Beer that is bottle-...


5

First, I would check to see if it's still drinkable. You might have a carboy of apple cider vinegar if you haven't put any sulfites into it or somehow prevented from oxidation. The way to test it is to get a siphon (that you have sanitized) and suck out a little to taste. If it tastes ok, then you need to prepare for bottling. I would follow these ...


4

Soap is absolutely the worst thing you could do I guess :P. Sometimes I notice that badly dried glasses (with soap rests) produce more foam... In general, make sure your glass is spotlessly clean. You could then either leave it dry or make it a little wet, works sometimes... Keep your glass diagonal to make sure the liquid touches the glass almost parallel ...


3

Over-carbonation is typically a sign of infection, which is certainly a possibility. It's not a problem I've had with Hitachino, but at their price point I don't drink them often


3

What you will be looking for is a Cask ale or cask-conditioned beer these are all generally very low carbonation or non at all due to only being left in a cask "Beer brewed from traditional ingredients, matured by secondary fermentation in the container from which it is dispensed, and served without the use of extraneous carbon dioxide" If you go to ...


2

Carbonation drops are just premeasured doses of priming sugar. Sometimes they'll be a mix of glucose and sucrose, or just a single sugar depending on the brand. But otherwise they're exactly the same as priming sugar, so no chemical or taste difference. They're probably being recommended by the instructions since they're pretty much impossible to mess up, ...


1

The short answer is - "It depends, probably not". Bottles are usually rated for Volumes of CO2. Champagne bottles are typically rated for 7 volumes. Wheat beer bottles should take around 5 volumes. Ales/Lager beers are normally carbonated at 2-3 volumes. However, flip-top bottles (I assume you mean the ones with the rubber seal) are produced in both CO2-...


1

While I can't point you to a calculator on beer gas mixture I can point you to this Fact sheet from the Brewers Association. The key to balance a tap system is figuring out the opposing pressures. The keg to tap resistance must be matched by the gas tank push pressure. The gas pressure puts in a little CO2, the liquid line squeezes a little out. However, in ...


1

I just went through four Hitachinos, and I can say for sure - they are solidly carbonated, but nothing I would call undrinkable. I've definitely had - and enjoyed - more carbonated beers. I've also had them before (bottle and poured at a bar) and never had the overcarbonation problem you describe.


1

Yes, you can re-carbonate long flat beer. If the beer has been only gone flat. Once re-carbonated I doubt that you would be able to tell the difference. I did this once with Corni Kegs and a CO2 pressure system over a couple days for 10 gallons. Tasted great. Beer doesn't go stale without contamination, but will go flat without a seal to keep pressurized. ...


1

Yes and No. Yes you can re-carbonate beer either by injecting CO2 into it either with a Sodastream (are those things still around) or natural conditioning as mentioned in another answer. No, you really don't want to do this. If the beer has gone flat, it is likely that it has lost the protective layer from the CO2 and oxidation has occurred and the beer is ...


1

I have a similar question, but interpret the original question differently - probably because I am a home brewer that lets the beer carbonate naturally. If you are forcing CO2 into the beer, I imagine you have greater control over levels of carbonation. However, I understand that the final gravity, alcohol content, amount of sugar, and temperature have the ...


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