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36

The beer will not be bad in the sense of unsafe to drink, since no harmful pathogens grow once the beer is fully fermented. So you can certainly drink the beer. However, the beer may not taste good! Over time, the beer will oxidize, both from oxygen introduced during packaging, but also through the release of oxygen from compounds previously oxidized in the ...


11

StillTasty.com has the following to say with regards to beer - particularly specifying that this applies to regular or light beer from bottles or cans manufactured by major breweries: Opened Containers Good for 1 day, refrigerated. Tips: Keep refrigerated and tightly covered. After opening, most commercially manufactured beer will remain ...


8

Yes, you can do this just like a bottle of sparkling wine. It should keep the beer for a couple of days, but not forever. Sometimes the corks don't work great, so I would buy a Champagne bottle stopper like the one below Don't get the one that hold onto the ridge under the bottle opening. They work great for Champagne bottles but not so good on Belgian beer ...


8

Most likely - Yes, it is safe to drink it. Your beer is almost guaranteed to be safe to drink for humans. No pathogens like alcoholic beverages. If you have bacteria in your beer, you will just have another style of beer (see Sour Beer). Your beer could taste bad, but 1 year over expiration date is usually nothing serious. A lot depends on the type of ...


6

From experience the only way you will be able to know it to crack one open and give it a try you they will be safe to drink. Of course if you try them and it tastes funny (e.g sour/bitter) or is not what expected in terms of carbonation (don't know what blond beer you are talking about to say) then just pour away there is no harm in giving it a try ...


6

All wine that you want to age for a long time should be kept at the same temperature. The difference in temperatures come when you want to serve the wine. White should be served at a lower temperature than cellar temperature. Red wine, ideally, should be served at cellar temperature. What is the ideal cellar temperature? That is open to debate, but somewhere ...


5

The ideal temperature for storing beer is between 10 to 15 ˚C (50 to 59 ˚F). If you are planning to preserve your beer for several years, it is better to have an even lower temperature of about 4 to 10 ˚C (40 - 50 ˚F). A cold cellar is ideal to preserve your beer as a humidity of about 60% - 65%. The reason being that it can affect the airtightness of the ...


5

This really depends on the drink itself. Some wines are meant to keep for years. Others should be drunk immediately. Most should be drunk within 1 or 2 years. So choose your wine carefully. There are various vintage wine guides online. That said, once you have chosen a wine meant for ageing, you do want a cellar (or if that is not available, a refrigerator ...


3

I did a deep dive into Stack Exchange because I thought this question would've been asked before! But, it has not. That doesn't mean that the answer isn't super easy to find. First of all, not all wines are meant to be aged. The vast majority of wines are meant to consume when you pick them up at the store. How can you tell which are which? Mainly on price ...


3

Found what I was looking for: WESTMARK 3 Flaschenverschlüsse, Flaschenstöpsel mit Hebel und Gummidichtung, 40 x 60 x 15 mm, farblich sortiert. Now I only need to order a box of these.


3

Unfortunately, there's not much one can do, at least using only household products. While filling, using a counterpressure bottle filler would maximize the longevity of the beer as well as filling the beer while it's very cold, near its freezing point ~29 degrees F (so that its CO2 is maximally dissolved), if you have a choice in the matter (likely not). ...


2

This depends entirely on the beer. As a rule of thumb I would say that any beer which is re-fermented once bottled, can be preserved for several years. You need to be careful when preserving, but it's not unheard of to drink 35 year old beers. Often these beers are the darker, stronger ones like Westmalle or Orval.


2

If the beer has been conditioned/pasteurized then you should store the beer as cold as possible - 2-5C is good. The biggest negative factor affecting beer storage is oxidative staling, and this proceeds 3 times faster for every 10°C/18°F increase in temperature. Inversely, each drop in temperature of the same amount causes the rate to reduce by the ...


2

Your question says they were opened? I'm going to venture probably not. You tagged this 3.2-beer, does that mean these are low alcohol session beers somewhere around 3.2% ABV? If the beers aren't moldy, best case scenario is you now have two bottles of home made malt vinegar. Make a balsamic, have some steaks with side salads. If they were closed or ...


2

This depends on many factors, but usually best-before date is what is states, also the date before which the full quality of the product is guaranteed. It doesn't mean you can't consume it afterwards, it just means that you can't make formal complaint about the taste or potential sickness caused by consumption of the product after that date. The people ...


1

I had to look up Chouchen as I'd never heard of it before (see, after many years still learning!) It looks like it's a form of mead made out of Buckwheat honey which gives it that dark color and probably stronger flavor. According to the article, it was originally made out of cider and honey but it looks like both versions are called Chouchen now. I looked ...


1

Yes it's safe to drink. There is nothing in there that wasn't in there already. If it was stored properly it should show some signs of aging which can be a good thing if you are into that. The oldest beer I ever drank was a 9 year old doppelbock and it was still pretty darn good. I have had beers turn to malt vinegar after a few years. Just open it and taste ...


1

After opening the bottle the beer will begin to oxidize and degrade in quality, so flavor will begin to suffer shortly after opening. Pressure will not continue to build in the bottle from fermentation, the yeast have consumed what residual sugar is present for bottle carbonation. That being said, the dissolved CO2 will remain in solution at cooler ...


1

It should still be safe, taste good is a personal opinion. Some beers age well, high alcohol, sours, and smoke beers. Others don't age as well (hoppy beers). Plus it all depends on how the beer was stored. Out in a hot garage? Sitting in your window sill?


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