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6

Before going to the various types of gin, I feel it necessary to define a few terms and for simplification I am going to use Wikipedia. What is gin? Gin is a spirit which derives its predominant flavour from juniper berries (Juniperus communis). From its earliest origins in the Middle Ages, gin has evolved from use in herbal medicine to an object of ...


4

I'll just go ahead and answer this question assuming it's better formed, something like: Which drinks are most popular in the winter? The difference to me in which drinks to choose in the summer versus the winter comes from the temperature in which you're drinking. In the summer people typically crave something that is light, cool, and refreshing in the ...


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Gin is very simply defined as a clear alcoholic spirit distilled from grain or malt and flavoured with juniper berries. So your differentiation between "made properly" and "just alcohol and flavor" is meaningless. Many of the finest gins are made by steeping juniper berries and other botanicals in the distilled spirit. Others are created by passing the ...


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Depending on how cold your gin would be served at, it aromas may be altered. As a spirit gets warmer, it releases more volatiles, compounds that easily vaporize. We know that if a spirit is too hot, the smell of pure alcohol can be overwhelming. However, when a spirit is too cold, the aromas and tastes might seem downright non-existent. This applies to ...


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Is it possible to have a non-alcoholic Gin? The short answer is yes. Pernod Ricard has signed a deal to launch and distribute South African/Swedish brand Ceder’s in the UK, which describes itself as a “non-alcoholic alt-gin made with classic gin and South African botanicals”. The non-alcoholic ‘spirit’ was launched in early 2017 by husband and wife ...


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I have not tasted that gin*, but from the description of the botanicals ("rosemary, thyme, olive, and basil") it seems to be crying out for savory rather than sweet. It sounds like a red snapper would be good (essentially a bloody mary with gin instead of vodka). Also sounds like a classic or dirty martini might be nice, depending on the vermouth on hand. *...


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This link has decent information on pairing spirits. The problem for giving generalizations becomes differences in palate. Most people don't pair straight spirits with foods as most (self injected word) people reading websites for pairings drink spirits in "cocktail" format. Information from the website includes: RYE Faile recommends pouring rye to ...


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According to Vinpair here are The 9 Best Gins To Use In A Martini! This list is not in order of best to worst. However, it does offer gin recommendations for various types of gin. Their number one all around recommendation is in fact Greylock. 1. Plymouth Plymouth is technically both a style and a brand – how’s that for pizzazz? Plymouth is remarkably ...


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There is actually a non-alcoholic Gin substitute called Seedlip which is made in a similar way; by passing steam instead of alcohol vapour through botanicals. Unfortunately I'm not sure how available it is outside of the UK. Please note that I am in absolutely no way connected to the company and have only tried a sip of a cocktail made with it in the past ...


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Just go to a supermarket (the bigger the better and I'd suggest Tesco or Asda) and buy their own brand london dry. It's not nice but it's cheap. If you really don't mind the taste, consider vodka instead as it's often a little bit cheaper and essentially the same stuff without the botanicals. Tesco gin Asda gin Sainsburys gin You're unlikely to get it ...


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In Scotland we have MUP (minimum unit pricing) which means you cannot sell alcohol for less than 50p per unit of alcohol so an average bottle of gin (38%) cannot be sold for less than £13.88 per 75cl bottle. The rest of the UK doesn't have this law so can be sold as low as cost price so is subject to supplier but can start from as low as £10 per 75cl bottle. ...


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I buy quite a lot of Gin from Amazon and their prices are often cheaper than the main UK supermarkets on a direct match basis, but not against Aldi or Lidl who often sell almost identical products to say Bombay Sapphire, but at a much cheaper price.


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