Hot answers tagged

11

As alluded to by Eric Shain, this is more a matter of the mathematics of aging than anything about the distilling process. The key trick going on here is that years of aging have been standardized with respect to interactions with the barrel they are aging in. While time is certainly important when it comes to aging whiskey, much more important is contact ...


5

Having distilled my own whisky in a small American Oak barrel, previously sherry-filled, with a little charring, I can give some direct experience: From blind taste tests with representatives from 3 major distilling groups in Scotland, at 3 years, my whisky had the look and feel, and taste, of an 8-10 year old whisky. The progression from raw spirit was ...


3

It's not that Scottish distilleries 'put out discount product at stores like Lidl and Aldi', but stores like Lidl and Aldi buy whisky from the producers to sell as own-brand products. It's a standard way of selling whisky, and has been around longer than the current distillery brand model. Most non-distillery/major blender whiskies you find in a supermarket ...


3

The answer is of course: both Lets take some popular examples... Balvenie Double Wood Matured in Ex-Bourbon casks and finished in Ex-Oloroso Sherry Casks, so (2) Auchentoshan Three Wood Matured in Ex-Bourbon casks for 10 years, then finished for two years in Ex-Oloroso Sherry casks and then finished for six month in Ex-PX Sherry casks, so (2) Laphroaig ...


2

Can a liquor be both a vodka and whisky? What's the difference? The short answer is yes. Here is what Wikipedia has to say about what constitutes a liquor. Liquor (also hard liquor, hard alcohol, distilled alcohol, fire water, or spirit water) is an alcoholic drink produced by distillation of grains, fruits, or vegetables that have already gone through ...


1

Interestingly, both names, "whisky" and "vodka," are derivatives of the word for "water" in their respective 'languages of origin'. "Whisky" (or uisge beath in Scottish Gaelic) means "Water of Life" whereas "vodka" (водка in Russian) means "little water" - both are, in a way, 'terms of ...


1

In general terms, vodka is almost pure alcohol and water, with very little inherent flavour. Whisky starts out the same way, but the final product has a very distinctive flavour (or rather many distinctive flavours, depending upon the maker). Some of the flavour comes from the fermented malted grain (the equivalent of beer), which is often infused with peat ...


1

There is no general definition of what a whisky is. There are of course special kinds of whisky (Single Malt Scotch Whisky, Kentucky Straight Bourbon, etc.) which are very well defined, but the simple word "whisky" can, unfortunatelly, be pretty much everything. There are "whiskies" from india, for example, that are distilled from ...


1

Generally, they make something that doesn't resemble Scotch Whisky. There are many styles and types of whisky, or whiskey with an 'e', and it's made all around the world. There are distinct and famous styles from Ireland, Japan, and the United States. Sullivan's Cove from Australia, Mackmyra from Sweden, and Kavalan from Taiwan have all made award winning ...


1

I buy a lot of single malts, and I have to say that some of those without age statements on the label are very good, e,g, Tullibardine Sovereign or Talisker Storm. I am not saying they are as good as the likes of Clynelish 14 or Aberlour 12 but they are very good. There is a lot of snobbery about single malts, but personally I prefer Bowmore Legend which ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible