9

Mead is not considered a style of beer, since the sugars in mead come from honey, not from the starch of a grain. Hops are sometimes added to mead for flavor and as a preservative. The process for making mead is more similar to wine making than brewing beer. There's no brewing (boiling) stage necessary in making mead. All of the fermentable sugar comes from ...


7

States often have different laws for beer and spirits, including different licensing requirements, different requirements for sales, and so forth. Because of that, some states have limits on the percentage of alcohol that is allowed in beer. In North Carolina, where I live, all spirits sales are state-controlled, and retail sales are only allowed in state-...


7

I'd say beermenus.com would be a good bet. My favorite local brewery updates their page every other day or so. It's funny that you mention this though. I just had an email exchange with the brewmaster regarding this very thing. I asked him to set up a webcam system which will update the list of beer offerings in realtime (similar to what the Dogfish Head ...


6

You can look for breweries in your areas that give tours. These often include free tastings. (Since you mentioned you're from the Chicago area, I know there's a bus tour that takes you to different breweries in Chicago and Milwaukee. There's a fee, but you'd get to try a lot of different beers.) Also, look for brewpubs and restaurants in your area that sell ...


5

Here is a link to the application for for registering beer brands As you can see on the form, there is a fee of $75 for each "beer brand". They define a "brand" as an individual beer style. No big deal if you are Miller/Coors/Bud, but a real hassle if you are a micro with a couple of dozen seasonal beers. Note that you also must list the "importing ...


4

In addition to what was already said, there's a lot of legal gray area, as most if not all states have different laws governing breweries and wineries. Mead is really something different than both, but I believe most meaderies choose to identify as wineries, and many if not all states prohibit wineries from having malt on premises, and breweries MUST use ...


3

There is no clearinghouse of all wineries in the USA. There are some that attempt to do this like Wine.com but they do not like to share the information unless you pay for it. The TTB (Alcohol and Tobacco and Trade Bureau) has to track every wine bottled because every label has to be approved by them. BUT, there are caveats. You don't need every label ...


3

You have to think of the volume of beer that's actually made. The big 'non-craft' brewers produce huge amounts of lager because the tradition for last hundred years or so has been to make lighter, more 'drinkable' beers. That also happens to fit with the big business ideal of being cheap to produce (light & drinkable means corn & rice are OK!). ...


3

Most beer shops and some grocery stores (if that's legal in your state) allow you to do a "Mixer-Sixer" or "Create your own six-pack" where you can combine a variety of single bottles/cans for a variety six pack. You pay a little bit extra per bottle for the convenience but and you get to pick specifically which ones you try. To learn your preferences, I ...


3

I will update this answer when I get more information from OP about region but I believe the following will be helpful: [edit]: reread the tags and spotted that it was US - think that my thoughts all still stand up but will check some specifics on US beer festivals. In the UK and a few other countries and regions organizations like CAMRA (the Campaign for ...


2

Bluepoint Brewery of Long Island NY makes Old Howling Bastard at 10% ABV (though I won't buy their beer anymore as they just sold to InBev a few weeks ago) Dirtwolf from Victory Brewing Company of Pennsylvania at 8.7% ABV At 9% ABV, you've got Double Simcoe from Weyerbacher Brewing Co of Pennsylvania Out of NY, you have Unearthly from Southern Tier, rolling ...


2

I live in a state that (mostly) requires that you buy beer by the case. I feel your pain. ("Mostly": there's still the bar option, and there are a very few places where you can buy mixed cases or six-packs of things other than the big mainstream beers.) The solution I'm partial to is the beer co-op. Mine started as a group of coworkers; we've scattered ...


2

Simplified definition: If you're fermenting grains, it's beer. If you're fermenting fruits, it's wine. If you're fermenting honey, it's mead. It's not really that simple, because there are beers that use fruit (e.g., cherry lambic, raspberry wheat), beers that use honey (it's a fairly common adjunct), wines that use fruit (e.g., elderberry wine), and a ...


2

Mead is an entirely different product which tastes more like a wine than a beer but is quite distinct from either in terms of taste, designation and production. I have never come across a mead flavoured with hops but some are flavoured with other botanicals such as spices or orange peel so I cannot guarantee that none are. Most beer breweries undertake a ...


1

Mead is its own thing but often will be called “Honey Wine” but it is never an ale or beer. The process it’s made from is pretty much a wine-making process but there are a few differences leading to the fact that some places list their meads and honey wines together and others list them separately. Technically mead is its own category, but it’s basically a ...


1

I also live in PA and am equally baffled by the PALCB regulations. If I had a dime for every time an out of stater asked me where they could buy alcohol, I could buy a brewery. My guess would be the local beer you tried just hasn't gotten to registering in PA. As far as opinions and rules on what beers can and can't be sold in PA, I'd think there are no ...


1

I'm not sure about Kentucky, but it seems to be legal here in NY. I've never ordered beer online as the shipping prices are astronomical and I've got a pretty decent beer distributor down the block with a large selection. With that said, the way it seems to work is that the delivery person (whether it be UPS, FedEx, DHL, USPS, etc) ID's you at the door ...


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