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14

It's often a misconception that one comes forth from the other, this is incorrect. The name was used to indicate the strength of the Westmalle beers. Originally there was the Enkel, Dubbel and Tripel. It is said that they represent the holy trinity. Later quadruppels were added. Both Dubbel and Tripel as name were first used by the Trappist brewery of ...


13

In Dutch the names mean double and triple, they originated at the Belgian Westmalle abbey brewery where the double was a strong brown ale. Their tripel was the name they gave to their strongest beer, a blonde pale ale. These beers quickly became popular and were imitated worldwide as were their names. The convention now is as following, a dubbel is a strong ...


9

I expect a high alcohol beer, with a lot of complex flavors. One that the alcohol content will "sneak" up on you because it isn't very obvious in the taste. Quoting from the Beer Judge Criteria: Aroma: Complex with moderate to significant spiciness, moderate fruity esters and low alcohol and hop aromas. Generous spicy, peppery, sometimes clove-...


7

I am a big fan of tripels and quadrupels. They are dark, and much smoother, I find, than blondes and other lower-alcohol beers (and yes, tripels are substantially more alcoholic). Contrary to the previous answer, I find they taste less bitter than typical beers, although perhaps it may be because the bitterness is masked by the other flavors perhaps? It ...


6

Color tends to come primarily from the malt bill used (darker roasted malts lending darker color to a beer). In the case of Belgian beers, a "candi" sugar (derived from beets) may used as an additive, and different styles use different types of candi sugars. For dubbels in particular, the candi is a darker variety, made with a (more) substantial dose of ...


4

Dubbels and Tripels are vastly different beers. While dubbels are generally something akin to a brown ale, malt forward with some light hints of dark fruit and roastiness, Tripels are pale to golden, being a vehicle for both the yeast flavors (clove/bananna), fruity esters, and the whims of the brewer (Belgian candi sugar, coriander and other spices are ...


3

As a Belgian chap, I obviously love our beer :). More specific, my favorite beers are always tripel beers. The thing about tripel beers is that the fermentation is achieved further in the bottle. In general I can tell you all tripel beers are always pretty blonde looking (maybe slightly darker) and doubles are always darker (like really brown!). In Belgium, ...


3

Depends what you mean with Belgian Triple. As I understand in the US it is used as a style name and it is base on the Westmalle Triple. You can see the style discription in the answer of Schleis. But if you want to know what to expect, try Westmalle Triple, it's a good (my preferred) benchmark. In Belgium it's not a style. It's merely a label to mark that ...


2

Bottle fermentation is somewhat of a misnomer, as the term should really pertain to any fermentation done in the final packaging, in tap beer's case that's the keg. Pretty much any unfiltered beer (not just tripels) will have sugar added to continue to ferment in the bottle/keg. If you think the bottled beer tastes better there's a simple explanation that ...


2

The biggest difference between Singels, Dubbels, Trippels, and Quads is ABV. The (purported) origin of these come from the Trappist Monasteries of Belgium where illiteracy was high. Because a lot of people couldn't read the kind of beer that was being brought to them, the barrels were marked with Xs. One X meant, low ABV (think <=3% ABV like Miller or ...


1

As stated above, if you want to know about a certain style the BJCP guidelines are a great place to start. Not all styles are reflected in the BJCP guidelines though. For instance, the BJCP doesn't recognize Black IPAs, or American Wild Ales. The Beer Advocate style guidelines, and the guidelines from the Great American Beer Festival might also be ...


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