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25

Beer Connoisseur Online answers this pretty thoroughly in an article. The TLDR: is that "...originally a stout was a strong version of a porter. Today, the difference is whatever you want it to be." For an interesting history on the term Stout and the style of beer, you can check out this history of stout article provided by Eric Deloak. Similarly you ...


19

It depends on the brew really; some do and others do not. More often than not, the chocolate flavor comes from the techniques used to roast the malts rather than chocolate itself. Some brewers will add additional chocolate to enhance the chocolate flavor a bit, but it generally doesn't get its flavor primarily from the chocolate. The same is true for coffee ...


18

Oyster stout traditionally uses oysters as part of the brewing process, and that is the flavour that differentiates them from other stouts. While it is traditional to use oysters, some modern breweries use artifical flavours in their oyster stouts, or simply say that they are intended to be eaten with seafood. You mention Marston's Oyster Stout, which is ...


17

Yes, the lactose remains in the beer at the end of brewing. In normal beer, the only sugar which enters the brewing process is from the malted barley: maltose and glucose released by the breakdown of starch, and a little sucrose and fructose. This 1953 analysis by a chemist in the Carlsberg research laboratory has all the gory details. Normal brewing yeast ...


10

Guinness is "carbonated" with nitrogen, where most beers use carbon dioxide. This requires different hardware, bottling equipment, etc. If you've ever witnessed the appearance of a perfectly poured Guinness, and paid more than $5 USD for it, you'll understand why. It's partly about presentation. As one of the oldest beers on the market, it requires us to ...


9

Like most beers, the main thing is the height of the foam on top of the beer. It's largely a matter of personal preference; the only considerations I'm aware of are: Bottle-fermented beers should be poured slowly and all in one go to prevent yeast from going into the glass (and, to that end, leave half a finger of beer in the bottle). Unless it's an ...


7

There is a table of amino acid composition in beers on page 105 of Beer: Health and Nutrition (C. W. Bamforth, 2004) (page 119 of the overall PDF): Other than that, I cannot find any nutritional breakdowns that include vitamins for stouts (and porters, in general). However, as far as micronutrients are concerned, there may not be as great a difference ...


7

Yes. Typically chocolate stout does contain chocolate. I've typically added chocolate to my home-brew during the boil phase (since it adds more sugars and I want the chocolate to melt).


6

Sort of. These stouts my also be known as "Blonde" or "White" in additional "Golden". Supposedly the idea first came about in 2007, when it was joked that Stone should brew a Golden Stout, it being a sort of oxymoron. However, it appears that now it exists. Stone Brewmaster Mitch Steele decided to create it, a light colored beer which had the flavors of a ...


5

There are a number of different types of porters and stouts, so it isn't necessarily a simple answer, but I would say the use of roasted grains in stouts, particularly roasted barley, is the biggest difference. As such, you end up with more burnt toast and coffee type flavors in a stout, but the amount and type of roastiness depends upon the type of stout. ...


5

No, federal malt beverage labeling laws make it optional (though they do describe standards the label must meet if brewers do choose to add the alcohol content label.) State laws, however, may require a brewer to add alcohol content to the label. Clearly Delaware law (where Dogfish Head is based) must not. In my experience, this is not terribly ...


5

I think a some of it is psychological - I too remember struggling to drink down a pint of Guinness. But now I can put away plenty! The darker color and dense head give the perception of a bigger beer. But in reality most pub Stouts such as Guinness are quite light beers, in terms of their physical density (specific gravity) so it's not that they are ...


5

Let's start off with beers that you're interested in, something akin to a black lager. I'm going to keep things focused on beer styles rather than particulars, since I do not know where you are nor what might be available for you. Dunkelweizen This is a dark wheat beer with characteristics of a traditional wheat with caramel type flavors joining the mix. ...


5

Just had a bottle of Marston's Oyster Stout two days ago (10/25/14), the label states it is brewed with oyster shells.


4

There was a similar question on the Cooking SE site. Perhaps you can try the approach suggested by Adam Shiemke in the accepted answer. He recommended using ethyl acetate and performing a little home science experiment as detailed here.


4

Guinness, and a few other beers out there, are carbonated in part with nitrogen, which has much smaller bubbles. This creates a smoother mouthfeel; this is the "creaminess" that is often described. The use of nitrogen is probably uncommon for a few reasons. Firstly, there's the added production cost in the bottled or canned product: the widget. Secondly, ...


4

Well, that style thing is complicated because in real world people just make beer, and don't make beer to satisfy styles guides (at least, not until very recentely when some people started to care more about style guidelines than the beer itself). Anyway, what I think is important to be aware is: Many styles have a long and old history, often centuries, ...


3

That very much depends on the brewery. Some use cocoa nibs to add the chocolate flavor, but often they use what are called "chocolate malt", grain that is roasted until it's the color of chocolate. These happen to add a fair amount of chocolate and coffee characteristics to the final product.


3

Oyster stouts are indeed brewed with oysters. The occasional offering that we sell (Niagara College Teaching Brewery), uses oysters at the end of the mash regime (hot soaking of the grains). The idea here is that you are extracting calcium carbonate from the shells, which helps reduce the tannic astringency that can result from the roasted grains used in ...


3

It won't hurt you, lactose (the 'key' ingredient of milk stouts) doesn't need to be refrigerated the way actual milk does. However, it is advisable to keep milk stouts refrigerated for two reasons: 1) They generally don't age particularly well, so keeping them in the fridge will best preserve the taste. 2) If a milk stout isn't pasteurized the lactose can ...


3

The short answer is no. While they're both styles of dark beer nowadays Mild is very low ABV with a lot of malty/nutty flavors and fruity sweetness. Stouts are stronger than milds with no fruitiness and a lot of roasted and burnt flavors instead of malts. Most will probably be more bitter and have less residual sweetness than milds. The long answer is: ...


3

There is a drink called the Hangman's Blood that uses either porter or stout, which aren't too far off of a mild (well, the porter at least). It also contains other things like rum and brandy so it might not be what you're thinking of, but it does have a history that goes back to around 1930 or so.


3

There are some stouts with cocoa in their recipes. Two that I like are Young's Double Chocolate Stout and Sadler's Mud City Stout, both available in bottles in the UK.


3

Guinness is in a style called "Dry Irish Stout", so anything on this list would probably substitute well. It sort of depends on what you felt was missing from the cake. We could work on narrowing it down to stouts that were stronger in those flavors. Oatmeal or milk stouts as styles would be sweeter than Guinness, some stouts might play up chocolate or ...


2

In addition to @john-m's answer about the modern white stouts which are paleish with coffee/chocolate flavors, there historically were pale stouts which predated our modern concept of stout as a dark beer with chocolate/coffee flavors. Check Zytophile for some historical context. He goes on for a bit but the main takeaway is that from the early 1700s to at ...


2

The name for a mixture of dark beer and gin (plus brown sugar) is a Dog's Nose. It was usually not mild but porter in the 19th century. It was heated with a little nutmeg on top. Dickens refers to it in Pickwick's Papers. By the 20th century it was still drunk in the East End but with Mild instead of porter and no sugar, nutmeg or warming. Cheers


2

Porters and Stouts were similar but different... in the beginning. I'm going to try my best to paraphrase this wonderful article, some of the BJCP Guidelines, and this article. Porters (have #s) Stouts (have bullet points) 1) A substantial, malty dark ale with a complex and flavorful roasty character. A very dark, roasty, bitter, creamy ale....


1

Two types of beers might suit you, both are similar but with slightly different flavour profiles. English mild ale has a lower alcoholic content than bitter or Guinness, generally dark coloured. Theakstons make a particularly nice mild on an irregular basis. Scottish 60 shilling (60/-) or light beer is similar to mild but is generally slightly sweeter to ...


1

Oysters used to be served as an accompaniment to beer in pubs in Victorian England, so the first beers called Oyster Stouts were probably beers intended to compliment oysters rather than containing them. Later someone discovered that you could use crushed Oyster shells as a fining agent in beer and later still someone actually added the oyster meat, probably ...


1

If it is an Oyster stout then it probably should have contact with ACTUAL oysters. Using the shells is a cop out that is like stone soup. Checkout new brewery Hammertown in London who do it properly: "In 1938 the original Hammerton Brewery was famous for being the first in the world to use Oysters as part of the brewing process. In this new recipe we’ve ...


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