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11

As alluded to by Eric Shain, this is more a matter of the mathematics of aging than anything about the distilling process. The key trick going on here is that years of aging have been standardized with respect to interactions with the barrel they are aging in. While time is certainly important when it comes to aging whiskey, much more important is contact ...


10

As an avid whisky fan, and having worked in a distillery and visited most Scottish distilleries, I can tell you this: It's incredibly easy - pretty much all the distilleries have 18 year old single malts. It's not rare at all, in fact I don't think I'd class them as "premium" in that way. For many of the whiskies I like I'll buy the 12, 15 and 18 year old. ...


8

Bourbon and scotch are types of whiskey and cognac is a variety of brandy. Bourbon is a type of whiskey, whereas not all whiskies are bourbons! The main difference between scotch and whisky is geographic: they are made in Scotland. Bourbon is a type of whiskey, whereas not all whiskies are bourbons! Bourbon is a type of whiskey that gets its name from ...


7

We need to work up a few definitions before we get to the final answer here. So without further ado: Single Malt Single Malt means that the whiskey has been made using ONLY malted barley and nothing else and has been distilled at a single distillery. This is to distinguish it from: Grain/Single Pot Grain Whiskey, called Single Pot or Pure Pot when it's ...


6

Right now I can think about some characteristics of a Sotch, that depend partly on the age: Flavours: The longer a whisky matures in a cask, the stronger is the influence of the cask on the flavours. So the character of a very young whisky largely comes from the distillery. That often means some fresh, fruity flavours, with a significant alcoholic taste. ...


5

Having distilled my own whisky in a small American Oak barrel, previously sherry-filled, with a little charring, I can give some direct experience: From blind taste tests with representatives from 3 major distilling groups in Scotland, at 3 years, my whisky had the look and feel, and taste, of an 8-10 year old whisky. The progression from raw spirit was ...


5

I'd say yes, but with the caveat that I've only tried a limited number of Irish whiskies (mostly big name brands) and so they might be a bit more varied than I'm aware of. I'm largely ignorant of what goes into the distilling process of both Irish whisky and Scotch, but what I notice as a taster is that Irish whisky is often very sweet, with more like a ...


5

From what I can find I'm not sure I can give an exact answer to the main question (when J&B started using screw caps) but I think I found something that matches your description, from 1972: https://www.maxliquor.com/product-p/j-and-b-scotch-1972-quart.htm As far as I can tell the label matches the picture on the page you linked and appears to have a ...


4

So, I am answering assuming you want to stick with single malts rather than go blended. Also because people live in different parts of the world, prices may vary. I would recommend Glenfiddich 12-y as a standard go to single malt and usually a bit cheaper than the rest. Other good brands include Dalwhinnie and Dalmore(this one being my personal favorite) ...


4

It depends if you like the smokier/peatier whiskies such as Talisker, or prefer the smoother whiskies. I find the former generally overpriced but that's me. A good example of the latter is Auchentoshan 12 year old. Easy drinking (is that a bad thing?), with no overpowering flavour but flavoursome all around and smooth bite (an oxymoron?) at the end. I saw ...


4

Is peaty whiskey made in other parts of the world besides Islay? The short answer is yes. Here are five examples from around the world: 5 Smoky World Whiskies Challenging Scotch When the topic of smoky whisky comes up in a bar it’s usually in association with Scotland, and more so, the famed isle of Islay. From Lagavulin to Bowmore, Islay enjoys a ...


4

Liquor casks are not cleaned between transfers, just emptied and stored until they need them again. The liquor that soaked into the wood makes sure nothing will grow in them. Wine barrels on the other hand, need to be cleaned between transfers. Typically they are rinsed with hot water and then maybe steam. Left to drip dry for a day or two. Then sulfur ...


3

The answer really depends on what you're looking for in the drink. 1) The hotter the whiskey the more rapid the alcohol evaporates out and more of the bitter-notes shine through. Adding ice is cold + water which can also mask some of the whiskey characteristics while taking away some of the "harsh" fore taste of the whiskey. *Whiskey stones could be a ...


3

The answer above nails the quantitative parts of the question, but I'll spend a little time adding a qualitative answer. In terms of flavour and the experience while drinking, Brandy and Whisky are quite similar. If you gave a taste test to a beginner they could easily mistake one for the other. At the same time, though, someone who was well versed in both ...


3

Glenmorangie is a 10-year highland single-malt scotch that outperforms its price point (currently $36 at Total Wine), in my opinion.


3

I'll start by saying that what I'm suggesting isn't technically a scotch recommendation, but it is a good tip for whisky, rye, and similar spirits. One of the more underrated genres of whiskey is "Bottled in Bond" type whiskey, bourbon, and rye. I've found that many of these spirits provide excellent value for the money. For example: Old Forester Heaven ...


2

Balvenie Doublewood is CHEAP and harsh, unless you get the 17 year but still harsh. If you want a REAL Single Malt Scotch that is not many 100's or 1000's of dollars try the Balvenie 21 Year Portwood. It is NOT harsh, it is 96 proof, smoothest stuff I have ever had!!! It is a lot more than the Doublewood though, about $150 for 750ml but if you can at least ...


2

I drink my Scotch neat -- too peaty/smokey and I gotta use an ice cube. Johnnie Walker Black is my go-to (~$74/1.75L at Costco in WA state). Picked up some Kirkland Signature 16-year Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky this evening (~$62/750mL in WA state) and it is very nice. :) The Balvenie Doublewood is probably my favorite, but it ain't cheap -- and ...


2

Here are few cocktails that I can recommend and don't require much ingredients: 1) Black Russian - Vodka and coffee liqueur 2) Screwdriver - Vodka and orange juice 3) Greyhound - Vodka and grape juice 4) Vodka Martini - My favorite


2

If you like Aberlour you will probably enjoy other Speysides, some well know brands are: Glenfiddich Glenmorangie Glenfarclas The Balvenie Dalwhinnie The Glenlivet Glen Moray They vary in price and each brand has different years which will obviusly effect the price. Of the above the Glenlivet Founders Reserve and Glen Maray Classic tend to be on the ...


2

Much of it has to do with the material they used to dry the grain. If the distillery traditionally used peat (because it worked well, was widely available, and cheap, the smell made its way into the spirits (this is why the Islay area has such a concentration of “peaty” whiskies. Much of the flavor and color comes from how the distillery ages the whisky. ...


2

It's not that Scottish distilleries 'put out discount product at stores like Lidl and Aldi', but stores like Lidl and Aldi buy whisky from the producers to sell as own-brand products. It's a standard way of selling whisky, and has been around longer than the current distillery brand model. Most non-distillery/major blender whiskies you find in a supermarket ...


1

As the previous answer says: 'yes'. You don't need to go very far from Islay to find peaty whisky: they're making it on Jura (which is about 250m away across the Sound of Jura from Port Askaig), and all over Scotland. However, lots of folks are importing their peat and/or peated barley from Scotland, as there's not much of a tradition of peating outside of ...


1

I buy a lot of single malts, and I have to say that some of those without age statements on the label are very good, e,g, Tullibardine Sovereign or Talisker Storm. I am not saying they are as good as the likes of Clynelish 14 or Aberlour 12 but they are very good. There is a lot of snobbery about single malts, but personally I prefer Bowmore Legend which ...


1

Just to extend farmersteves answer...There are quite a few that produce limited releases annually. These tend to be limited releases produced either by a new brand or established distilleries but they are usually limited to smaller cask numbers. As they are limited I would expect you to have to pay a bit more, many sell out quickly from shops so you may ...


1

I think there are two ways to look at this. Some distilleries do put the date when they bottled the whisky/scotch it will just take some leg work. Even cheap Old Turkey has a bottled date stamped on the label Then the other way is to do some reverse math. There is such a thing as vintage whisky. Distilled and put into barrels in say 1990 and aged 25 years. ...


1

The problem you have is implied in the question: 'affordable' and 'good' Scotch don't really go hand in hand, depending on what you mean by affordable. It's not a matter of brands, it's a matter of the average entry-point for a quality product, which is surprisingly consistent. If a distillery produces a good whisky, they are going to price it according to ...


1

Are you looking for a single malt? Those may be a little more expensive. A blend like The Famous Grouse will include good scotches from the region including Glenturret. If you are looking for something a bit smokier, I am a fan of Talisker Storm.


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