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12

Beers served on nitro have only about 25-40% of the dissolved carbon dioxide compared to regular beers served only on CO2. For stouts, the figure is usually closer to 25% - 40% is for lagers served on nitro. With only 25% of the carbon dioxide, there is less concern of creating too large a foam. Plus the nitrogen causes the foam to be made of very very ...


10

Guinness is "carbonated" with nitrogen, where most beers use carbon dioxide. This requires different hardware, bottling equipment, etc. If you've ever witnessed the appearance of a perfectly poured Guinness, and paid more than $5 USD for it, you'll understand why. It's partly about presentation. As one of the oldest beers on the market, it requires us to ...


9

A proper hefeweizen is an unfiltered beer. The yeast and other sediment that would be filtered out for other brews is left in. These particles tend to accumulate on the bottom of the bottle during storage. By swirling the the beer in the bottle you're suspending that yeast and sediment so it can be poured into your glass. This is what gives hefeweizens ...


9

Unfortunately, I don't know the source of this image—a Google reverse image search reveals only a single webpage which itself attributes the image to Google searching.


9

When pouring a beer with sediment, or lees, make sure your glass is of a size to accommodate the full contents of the bottle plus the attendant foam. Pour smoothly into the glass, watching the neck of the bottle, and suspend pouring when you see sediment starting to come to the neck. If you haven’t screwed it up, you have a glass of clear, inviting beer. ...


7

With regards to the beer, 4 things primarily determine the amount and consistency of head: Types of malt used: light malt typically produces larger, more dish-soapy bubbles. Roasted or dark malts will typically produce smaller bubbles. The proteins in the malt are what determine the consistency of the bubbles. There are additives that can alter and enhance ...


5

This is very broad so I will stick to wine in my answer. There are many considerations for pouring, you have the aesthetic aspects and presentation, and you have the mechanical aspects which can change the properties of the served drink. For wine, the waitress was right from a presentation point of view when served in a fine dining setting. Holding the ...


4

Guinness' perfect-pour is actually a marketing scheme that gives them an exclusivity factor. They have training courses and will invite patrons that visit Guinness to become masters of The Perfect Pour. However, it has no real impact on the beer. The actual answer to pouring is much less mystic and much more scientific. The pour does matter for several ...


4

Guinness, and a few other beers out there, are carbonated in part with nitrogen, which has much smaller bubbles. This creates a smoother mouthfeel; this is the "creaminess" that is often described. The use of nitrogen is probably uncommon for a few reasons. Firstly, there's the added production cost in the bottled or canned product: the widget. Secondly, ...


3

Foam comes from over pumping. For most of my keg beers I (with a CO2 tank) use about 11-15psi). For a hand pump this is more difficult. You will have to resist the urge to over pump. If you are a little more engineer-minded you can look at THIS article to gauge more consistently your tap pressures. Make sure you let the keg settle after moving as well. Just ...


3

To pour a beer you take a clean beer glass, preferably those made by the brewery specifically for their beer. You hold the glass at 45 - 60 degree angle and gently pour the beer into the glass. You then move, after pouring half of the beer, the glass into the upright position as to make a foam colar of about 2 cm. Depending on the beer you should or should ...


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