Hot answers tagged

25

Beer Connoisseur Online answers this pretty thoroughly in an article. The TLDR: is that "...originally a stout was a strong version of a porter. Today, the difference is whatever you want it to be." For an interesting history on the term Stout and the style of beer, you can check out this history of stout article provided by Eric Deloak. Similarly you ...


11

There are a few theories out there, and their veracity, like that of most historical "facts", is hotly debated. One theory begins in 1722 when Ralph Harwood, a London brewer, created a beer called Entire. For some time, working folk had been drinking a blend of beer, ale, and strong beer, which pubs would mix to balance out their stocks and maintain ...


8

There is a table of amino acid composition in beers on page 105 of Beer: Health and Nutrition (C. W. Bamforth, 2004) (page 119 of the overall PDF): Other than that, I cannot find any nutritional breakdowns that include vitamins for stouts (and porters, in general). However, as far as micronutrients are concerned, there may not be as great a difference ...


6

TL;DR: Yes, but they're growing. This chart shows, for craft beer sold in 2012, the relative portion of the market each style made up, with IPA being the most popular (a relatively new occurrence). Porters do not even show up. Here's another for 2011 showing porters as quite low on the list. This chart shows the year-over-year increase in sales by style. ...


6

There are a number of different types of porters and stouts, so it isn't necessarily a simple answer, but I would say the use of roasted grains in stouts, particularly roasted barley, is the biggest difference. As such, you end up with more burnt toast and coffee type flavors in a stout, but the amount and type of roastiness depends upon the type of stout. ...


4

Well, that style thing is complicated because in real world people just make beer, and don't make beer to satisfy styles guides (at least, not until very recentely when some people started to care more about style guidelines than the beer itself). Anyway, what I think is important to be aware is: Many styles have a long and old history, often centuries, ...


2

Last question: no. Porter is very malty beer originated in Britain, intended to give energy through it's high calorie content. Popular at the time of it's invention among people that carry stuff, also known as 'porters'. Port is a red wine that is stopped in it's fermentation by addition of brandy, resulting in a drink both sweeter and stronger than wine. ...


2

As @Eric mentioned in the comments, it is similar to wine, where you would expect a dry (or brut for sparkling) wine to have low to no residual sugars. A dry beer (porter, in this case) is brewed specifically to ensure that the carbohydrates are all converted to fermentable sugars, which are then fermented as the term would indicate, leaving you with a ...


2

Porters and Stouts were similar but different... in the beginning. I'm going to try my best to paraphrase this wonderful article, some of the BJCP Guidelines, and this article. Porters (have #s) Stouts (have bullet points) 1) A substantial, malty dark ale with a complex and flavorful roasty character. A very dark, roasty, bitter, creamy ale....


1

Yes, there are craft beer pubs in Porto and microbreweries from Porto! Particularly, Cerveja Letra was born not far from Porto and later opened a beer garden in Porto; Cervejaria do Carmo has around 50 different types of craft beers, giving more visibility to craft beers from Porto than to internacional brands; Fábrica da Picaria has its own craft beer being ...


1

BJCP style guides aside, I generally love porters and don't care for stouts. The latter (in my experience) tend to have a much more pronounced roasted malt character. (I do like most milk stouts though, now that that's a thing)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible