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11

Order what you like. Drink what you like. Life is too short to drink what someone else wants or expects you to. If people care what you're drinking at this bar, then I question why you'd want to be there.


9

Bourbon and scotch are types of whiskey and cognac is a variety of brandy. Bourbon is a type of whiskey, whereas not all whiskies are bourbons! The main difference between scotch and whisky is geographic: they are made in Scotland. Bourbon is a type of whiskey, whereas not all whiskies are bourbons! Bourbon is a type of whiskey that gets its name from ...


7

You should drink anything you like - but if you intend to have one drink and nurse it for an hour, there are some considerations for optimizing the experience. Ice cubes are not nice cubes Most of your typical highballs (shot of liquor topped up with a soft drink) are served "on the rocks" - with as much ice as the establishment thinks it can get away with....


6

I had never heard of this saying (I'm not a native English speaker), but the funny thing is that in Dutch there is a similar saying, except with wine instead of liquor and the other way around: 'wijn na bier is plezier, bier na wijn is venijn'. This roughly translates to 'wine after beer is fun, beer after wine is poison'. I once read an interview with a ...


5

How can I layer liquors on top of each other? The key to creating perfectly layered drinks is to pay attention to how heavy each ingredient is compared to the other ingredients. The weight of each liquid is measured by its specific gravity. An alcohol density chart can be viewed here. There are a few simple rules to follow: You want to use a ...


5

Rakia or Rakija is the collective term for fruit brandy popular in the Balkans. Wikipedia has this to say about Rakija: Rakia or Rakija is the collective term for fruit brandy popular in the Balkans. The alcohol content of rakia is normally 40% ABV, but home-produced rakia can be stronger (typically 50%). Common flavours are šljivovica, produced ...


4

There is no way to determine if a particular flavored vodka has added sugar or glycerin! Unless one can find a particular website of a certain vodka, which states that there is no added sugar or glycerin the chances are that you will have to taste the product yourself in order to know. The following information is from Drink Skool: If you’re confused, ...


4

In 1821, the four Rodenbach brothers (Pedro, Alexander, Ferdinand and Constantijn) invested in a small brewery in Roeselare, in the West Flanders province of Belgium. The brothers agreed to a partnership for 15 years. At the end of this period, Pedro and his wife, Regina Wauters, bought the brewery from the others and Regina ran the business while Pedro ...


4

It could definitely be a perception thing or any difference with the situation in which you consume beer vs liquor. (IE, if you're drinking a lot of Jack and Coke maybe that caffeine is helping keep you alert?) I think the most compelling answer is that there's actually a decent amount of research that shows hop compounds actually have a slightly sedative ...


4

We already have three bottles identified. From left to right First bottle may be Gekkeikan Junmai Skye Blue Sake, suggested by crypdex Second bottle may be Bols Advocaat, suggested by OldPadawan Third bottle is Midori, identified by kazzie. Fourth bottle is Benedictine, identified by Yendor Fifth bottle is Choya Umeshu plum wine, identified by ellison in ...


3

I suspect that there is no science behind it and that the saying is something akin to an old wive's tale, something often re-told but not actually scientifically accurate. It might be the case that people who start with beer and end with liquor sometimes get sick because they loosen up with a beer buzz, and start drinking liquor too quickly. But there is no ...


3

The answer above nails the quantitative parts of the question, but I'll spend a little time adding a qualitative answer. In terms of flavour and the experience while drinking, Brandy and Whisky are quite similar. If you gave a taste test to a beginner they could easily mistake one for the other. At the same time, though, someone who was well versed in both ...


3

5th bottle is Choya plum wine.


3

I finally did a little digging. The Late Medieval Period is generally considered from 1300-1500. Whisky, did not become wide spread until the 1700s. The first recorded instance of Whisky production was in 1494: The Guild of Barber Surgeons.[15] The earliest Irish mention of whisky comes from the seventeenth-century Annals of Clonmacnoise, which ...


3

Fig liqueur completed after 4 weeks. Here are notes: A lot more work than I expected it would be to strain out the liquid. Next time I'll use a food processor instead of making the base puree by hand. It's much darker than I expected The taste is nice, a little tannic on the finish. I've successfully used it in a Collins-type cocktail - in a rocks glass,...


3

How do Hungarians drink Palinka? Pálinka should be served at 18–20 °C (64–68 °F) because it is at this temperature that the fine smell and taste of the fruit can be best enjoyed. If served too cold, the smell and the taste will be difficult to appreciate. The form of the glass used to drink pálinka affects the drinking experience. The ideal glass is ...


3

Some tips: Protect your bottles from sunlight and extreme temperatures. If your bottles have cork tops, make sure to keep the corks moist so that they don't disintegrate (just turning the bottles upside down every month or so for a few seconds does wonders). As the level in each bottle drops, consider transferring the contents to a smaller bottle. This ...


2

This really just comes down to personal preference if you can haply sit and drink a stout all night, or a larger, or even cocktails it all comes down to how you handle the alcohol. It is certainly not against the norm to order a beer wine or shots. Bars cater for the many not the few, so if you want to drink beer all night drink beer all night, don't be ...


2

I'm using fresh picked figs from our tree. Pureed and mixed I part good quality vodka to 1 part fig puree. I also added a tablespoon of sugar to the mixture. I'm storing the Mason jars in a cool dark closet. I'll let you know how it turns out.


2

"Goldshlager" has little flakes of gold leaf, which is used for wood signs, and glass. Gold leaf is expensive to purchase at the art supply store, and expensive for the customer who wants gold leaf pounded onto glass, or a customer who wants a sand-blasted redwood sign with gold leaf.


2

You can see pretty much anything in the bottle. This article provides a good first look (trigger warning!). Besides the stuff described there I witnessed bottles with exotic fish, giant prawns, and kelp. I even tasted some of them; we were not amused.


2

Habushu is a common Japanese liqueur, where they put snakes inside the bottles. There are two methods of inserting the snake into the alcohol. The maker may choose to simply submerge the snake in the alcohol and seal the bottle, thus drowning the snake. Alternatively, the snake may be put on ice until it passes out, at which point it is gutted, bled and sewn ...


2

I recognize Strega. It is a digestif from Benevento, Italy. Flavor can become unstable over time. Used in some modern cocktails as well. I don't have my books in front of me, but it is normally more yellow, from saffron. An herbal liqueur. There's recipes using it in the PDT book and sometimes in Imbibe magazine.


2

Starka does not age in bottles, and has no vintage, so I don't think it can be of any interest. Tokay ages very well, and 70 years old one might be interesting. On the other hand, I have a serious reservations regarding Richon leZion wine-masters of 1947. I would expect something along the lines of Carmel wines, but less refined. It definitely has a great ...


2

It does depend on the liquor you're using since they have specific gravity's. You can pour them carefully over a spoon to minimize disturbance, or (what I always did) pour them slowly down the side of the glass, one by one in order (highest gravity on bottom). This page spells it out pretty well: Specific Gravity Chart for Layering Drinks and Shots.


1

The good news is that you can find an answer here, the bad news it is not in English. Briefly, it doesn't say how to remove opacity now that you have it, but it gives explanation on not having it in your next try (basically, opacity depends on microemulsions in 190 proof everclear: if you use everclear mixed with water and sugar, and it is lightly heated, ...


1

Two relatively boring answers: The spherical plastic widget (yes, that's its official name) found in bottles and cans of Guinness stout. I don't fully understand the physics, but it seems the point is something about generating a smooth and creamy head when the beer is opened and poured. The "one-of-a-kind shimmer" found in Viniq fruit liqueur. This how-to ...


1

I would imagine it would be either whiskey or wine brandy came from Brandivine (excuse spelling or similar pronunciation) meaning burnt wine also cider was probably popular due to the fact that the water quality was poor


1

If it's busy just grab a double Gin and Tonic and sip on that for half an hour or so while the bar settles down. Once it gets quieter you can ask the bartender for a recommendation on a local IPA and try something like Mojo in the Denver airport. After that you should try something seasonal. For instance, if it's Cinco De Mayo you might want a couple tequila ...


1

This is a good question that a lot of people wonder about. Ordering whatever you like, as many of these answers say, is totally right, though I don't think that's the full story. The way that you order can help you build a relationship with your bartender (and other patrons), and that is always a good thing. An example of this is a shot of a liqueur called ...


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