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9

Drink it neat but chilled. the author of the Wikipedia entry seems to agrees with this statement too. Limoncello is traditionally served chilled as an after-dinner digestiv I would recommend it chilled in a chilled shot glass. It’s an aperitif/digestiv so you wouldn’t want to fill up on it...Separately you are quite right though, it is a nice cocktail ...


7

This is how limoncello is served in the province of Salerno (where it mainly comes from): Very cold shot glasses (they're not opaque, it's rime on them). But I'd rather drink it in a cocktail, it's just tooo sweet for my taste.


6

I'm not a massive fan of Bailey's myself, but do love a chocolate mousse. Since unless you're going way overboard with the alcohol, you're not really going to disrupt the mousse and make it soupy, you can use anything that you think goes with chocolate. Personally, I love the following paired with a good dark chocolate: Kahlua/Tia Maria (most similar in ...


3

What's the difference between Amaretto and Crème de Noyaux? Amaretto County of origin: Italy (Saronno, Italy) Alcohol by Volume: 28% Flavor: Slight bitter almond "Flavoured from bitter almonds, various modern commercial brands are prepared from a base of apricot stones, peach stones, or almonds, all of which are natural sources of the benzaldehyde that ...


3

The sweetness is a little much for me on its own but I find it very refreshing, So I tend to enjoy it as a frappe. Simply equal parts ice and Limoncello and run it through “crushed ice” setting in the blender for a mintute or two. Brilliant summer time drink!


2

"Goldshlager" has little flakes of gold leaf, which is used for wood signs, and glass. Gold leaf is expensive to purchase at the art supply store, and expensive for the customer who wants gold leaf pounded onto glass, or a customer who wants a sand-blasted redwood sign with gold leaf.


2

You can see pretty much anything in the bottle. This article provides a good first look (trigger warning!). Besides the stuff described there I witnessed bottles with exotic fish, giant prawns, and kelp. I even tasted some of them; we were not amused.


2

Habushu is a common Japanese liqueur, where they put snakes inside the bottles. There are two methods of inserting the snake into the alcohol. The maker may choose to simply submerge the snake in the alcohol and seal the bottle, thus drowning the snake. Alternatively, the snake may be put on ice until it passes out, at which point it is gutted, bled and sewn ...


2

There are several types of filtering systems out there. I suggest a hobby level plate and frame filter. You can filter at 5 microns or less, but 5 is probably good enough to remove the sediment. There are cartridge filter systems too. But I would poke around a homebrewing or winemaking store on the web to see what is going to suit you the best.


2

I like it as a digestive, refreshed around a few °C above 0. However, making some ice cubes in a freezer (nice to have a few of these special plastic bags in the freezer, each filled with a different liquor in fact), and after having crush a cube (e.g. with a mortar and pestle), adding that "slush" on top of an adequate cocktail (fruity one for instance) ...


2

I'd say it is probably too sweet to be enjoyed as part of a meal except as an aperitif as @Eric suggested. Since Carob tastes like chocolate and this is a sweet strong liqueur. Maybe consider using it in a Tiramisu recipe as a substitute for Marsala? I have used Amaretto in this way before and it was delicious! Carob is often used as a substitute for ...


1

As Ken pointed out (although didn't make a point of): Aside from being made using slightly different ingredients, one is a liqueur and one a creme liqueur, which contain a lot more sugar and are therefore more syrupy in consistency. Therefore, although they taste similar, it may not be a good idea to substitute one for the other. I personally enjoy an ...


1

The good news is that you can find an answer here, the bad news it is not in English. Briefly, it doesn't say how to remove opacity now that you have it, but it gives explanation on not having it in your next try (basically, opacity depends on microemulsions in 190 proof everclear: if you use everclear mixed with water and sugar, and it is lightly heated, ...


1

Two relatively boring answers: The spherical plastic widget (yes, that's its official name) found in bottles and cans of Guinness stout. I don't fully understand the physics, but it seems the point is something about generating a smooth and creamy head when the beer is opened and poured. The "one-of-a-kind shimmer" found in Viniq fruit liqueur. This how-to ...


1

Most Hollywood blockbusters are well paired with beer. For example boxing scenes from Rocky fit Budweiser. Hollywood classic may differ. In my opinion, Gone With The Wind requires Bourbon, and My Fair Lady is all about Campaign. Forrest Gump should fit Dr. Pepper but you can improve the drink with Bourbon or Whiskey. And of course Zorro must go with Tequila. ...


1

I am going to make the following recommendation for the "Harry Potter" series. Mandrágora Liqueur from the Basque region of Spain. This liqueur from Navarra (in Spain) contains mandrake extract – a plant whose medicinal properties are the subject of many myths and legends. Alkaloid, an active component contained in the plant, can supposedly initiate ...


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