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17

The German Beer Purity Law, also know as the Reinheitsgebot, dictates what ingredients may be used to create beer in Germany: barley, hops, and water. It dates back to 1487, which is why you may notice the omission of yeast: it hadn't been recognized as an ingredient yet. The law was removed from the books in 1993, and replaced by another similar law which ...


16

In addition to what's been said, the original purpose of the order was to protect consumers from brewers who used problematic (toxic/psychoactive) herbs to preserve their beer, instead forcing them to use hops. Also only using barley allowed wheat and rye to be used exclusively by bakers to keep the cost of bread down. One could argue the tradition has ...


13

In 2001, Florida State Senator Tom Lee championed a bill which was passed that allowed for more sizes of beer containers to be sold in Florida. Prior to the bill passing, only 12 ounce, 16 ounce or 32 ounce packaging was allowed. This prevented most craft beers from entering the state and to allow those entry, the law enacted stated that anything under 32 ...


11

Most States have two different types of liquor licenses. On premise and Off premise. On premise is selling alcohol to drink there, off premise is for taking stuff home. It is entirely possible that an establishment will only have one or the other.


8

It isn't that half-gallon growlers are specifically illegal as such, but more of a quirk of how the different types and sizes of legal containers are defined. The Florida laws governing beer (or more accurately "malt beverage") container sizes specify that: Individual containers of malt beverage sold or offered for sale shall be no larger than 32 ...


8

Part of it is philosophical Why are airplane pilots regulated differently from car drivers? Because it's much easier to do damage with one vs the other. Likewise, it's a lot easier to get so drunk that you do something stupid (or just get alcohol poisoning) on liquor than beer. As such, they're treated differently. Part of it is political The companies ...


7

They can, provided that they: Cover up existing labels Add their own label containing the brewery name, beer name, and abv. Are a brewery (bars and retailers cannot). You're not alone in being confused, though. A lot of breweries didn't really know either, and as a result decided not to, just to be safe. Further complicating the issue is that many ...


7

Reviewing various state regulations on GoBYO, corking fees generally do not appear to be mandatory but instead optional for establishments that already have liquor licenses. Beverage sales generally represent some of the highest profit items for restaurants. Soda tends to have the highest margins since it is so cheap, but alcohol is easily a 200% or higher ...


7

States often have different laws for beer and spirits, including different licensing requirements, different requirements for sales, and so forth. Because of that, some states have limits on the percentage of alcohol that is allowed in beer. In North Carolina, where I live, all spirits sales are state-controlled, and retail sales are only allowed in state-...


6

It is in my opinion mainly thanks to low excise duty on beer in the Czech republic. Another factor is the fact that there are lower prices of almost everything in the Czech republic (I am talking mainly about local food and beverages). And last but not least, Czech republic is I guess second or third in the whole world in beer consumption, which means ...


6

It appears that there may be several laws in play here, but perhaps the interpretation of those laws by the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission, the brewers, and the Mass Brewers Guild that determine how growler fills work in practice. The first law in question is the regulation on labeling. Nothing in there appears to prevent brewers ...


5

No, federal malt beverage labeling laws make it optional (though they do describe standards the label must meet if brewers do choose to add the alcohol content label.) State laws, however, may require a brewer to add alcohol content to the label. Clearly Delaware law (where Dogfish Head is based) must not. In my experience, this is not terribly ...


5

Here is a link to the application for for registering beer brands As you can see on the form, there is a fee of $75 for each "beer brand". They define a "brand" as an individual beer style. No big deal if you are Miller/Coors/Bud, but a real hassle if you are a micro with a couple of dozen seasonal beers. Note that you also must list the "importing ...


5

Retail stores in Colorado sell spirits, wine, and beer. Grocery and convenience stores sell 3.2 percent beer only, and then not between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. Package stores are open 8 a.m. until midnight and are closed on Sundays. Bars stop selling alcohol between 2 a.m. and 7 a.m. http://www.alcohollaws.org/coloradoalcohollaws.html I would guess those "...


5

Part of the answer has to do with how the beverages survived prohibition. Winemakers were allowed to continue producing various grape products like grape juice, and even sold home wine kits with explicit instructions on how to avoid making wine from them. Very tongue-in-cheek. A lot of liquor distillers managed to survive somewhat on their liquors being ...


5

In Colorado only 1 store in a chain is allowed to sell liquor, wine or full strength beer. These are known as 'State Stores'... So a chain like Target or King Soopers picks one location in the state that they want to have that license and that's the one that can sell it... All others are only allowed to sell 3.2 beer.


5

Alcohol free beer is not non-alcoholic, it does still contain some alcohol. It often contains around about 0,5%. A beer can be called alcohol-free from 1%. To specifically respond to your situation I could not find any source saying that the Netherlands have an age restriction on alcohol-free beer. On the contrary the following sources indicate the opposite....


5

There is indeed a EU Regulation No 110/2008 about "the definition, description, presentation, labelling and the protection of geographical indications of spirit drinks" which prescribes the minimal ABV for different spirits and it happens to be about 40%. So the minimum alcoholic strength by volume of rum shall be 37,5 %. the minimum alcoholic strength by ...


4

It is also often seen as a gateway if you let kids buy bottles of lets say Becks Blue it gets them in to drinking at a young age and as a younger body is still not fully developed it can lead to health issues or dependency on alcohol from an early age so it really comes down to not enough research on how a younger body can processes it and it is really hard ...


3

The above answer is correct. Just to expand a little, companies can only hold one Colorado retail liquor store license, which is the type of license that allows them to sell "full strength" beer, wine and spirits. It's the same class of liquor license held by the liquor stores found in most shopping centers. There is no limit to the number of 3.2% beer ...


2

The answer is probably the dawn of human civilization. Beer was probably one of the first consumables ever commercialized. We can find commercial receipts for the sale of beer dating back over 4,000 years (Alulu beer receipt, 2050 BC) and advertisements for beer from even further back (Ebla Tablets, 2500-2250 BC) Hammurabi's Code from ~1750 BC has several ...


2

I am Czech and I would say there are few factors to it. Firstly many grocery products are cheap as well as services which makes beer affordable even in restaurants. Most importantly there is long historical tradition in drinking beer. It is common to drink it with lunch, it is usual to visit the pub for a chat with friends and drink 1,2 or 10 beers there. ...


2

It is not legal to ship alcohol(beer, wine, or spirits) through the mail across state or national lines unless you have a license. This has to do with each state wanting to get it's tax revenue for the imported alcohol. That doesn't mean it's not done, it's just less likely for a site that wants to stay in business to allow transactions that would result in ...


2

In addition to the ground covered in other answers, some of it undoubtedly is historical in nature due to the fact that wine, beer, and other ales historically were consumed for hydration and energy. This slate article covers some of this; while it was probably a myth that people drank ales as a source of clean water, they did hydrate and gain energy from ...


2

Here is what the PA Liquor Control Board has to say: PA LCB answer to legality of selling growlers In a nutshell, a growler is an open container, but it is up to the local police or state police to decide whether or not to enforce the law. My guess is that if the growler is full and out of your easy reach, you are probably OK unless you have given the cop ...


1

I also live in PA and am equally baffled by the PALCB regulations. If I had a dime for every time an out of stater asked me where they could buy alcohol, I could buy a brewery. My guess would be the local beer you tried just hasn't gotten to registering in PA. As far as opinions and rules on what beers can and can't be sold in PA, I'd think there are no ...


1

I'm not sure about Kentucky, but it seems to be legal here in NY. I've never ordered beer online as the shipping prices are astronomical and I've got a pretty decent beer distributor down the block with a large selection. With that said, the way it seems to work is that the delivery person (whether it be UPS, FedEx, DHL, USPS, etc) ID's you at the door ...


1

It strongly depends on the country, but in many countries, including Poland, there is special tax on alcohol, called Excise. You need to register your product for that tax, and you must also get special permit for selling alcohol. There are other procedures for registering as alcohol producer for selling them to publicity, and for getting permission to ...


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