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39

Ale yeast strains are best used at temperatures ranging from 10 to 25°C, though some strains will not actively ferment below 12°C (33). Ale yeasts are generally regarded as top-fermenting yeasts since they rise to the surface during fermentation, creating a very thick, rich yeast head. That is why the term "top-fermenting" is associated with ale yeasts. ...


17

A pictty good summary: (Source: BeerSci: What Is The Difference Between A Lager And An Ale?) The first part of the picture depicts the description in my answer about where the yeast "works," the temperatures at which they work, and then some common types of ales/lagers. The second picture shows S. cerevisiae (common ale yeast) and a wild yeast S. ...


15

The first, and primary reason any beer comes in branded glassware is this: Marketing. Brewers, like any other businesses, like for the general public to know that the anonymous tapped beer you're drinking is theirs. That is why they provide branded glasses to bars, and request (or require) that their beer be served in their glasses. Is there a ...


12

This is pretty good explanation Source: Twenty Things Worth Knowing About Beer.


10

The BJCP classifies Corona Extra as a Premium American Lager, being, clear, yellow, not hoppy but with a little more body than a light. Assuming 'dry' isn't some radically different beer, the category would probably still be correct. BJCP draft guidelines (not official) consider putting Asahi Super Dry and Corona Extra in 2A 'International Pale Lagers' ...


7

It doesn't actually mean anything; or at least, it almost never means the same thing twice, and doesn't refer to any specific common style or process. It's about as meaningful as the fact that several dozen breweries have a beer they label as "Select". For example, in the case of Molson Export, the story goes that it was deemed so high quality that it was "...


7

Most generic lagers have subtle differences, but in general as you say they are usually very similar. To be frank, though, this is something I find with just about any style of beer. For instance, if I'm buying an imperial stout from any given brewery I can reasonably expect what the beer is going to taste like for the most part. The only thing that really ...


6

You want a mildly flavored, low hop beer for something like this. I would suggest a Kolsch or Helles Lager or a Mild. Pilsners can be heavily hopped. I have done a lot of this with wines when I taught winemaking classes at a community college near here. We used very low aroma wines like a warm climate sauvignon blanc. You want the same for this since you don'...


5

According to Stella Artois In order to perfectly enjoy the unique taste and beauty of Stella Artois, we created the Chalice, instead of merely a glass. The Chalice is designed so that every curve serves a discrete purpose to how Stella Artois should be enjoyed. The authentic shape of the body encourages the perfect balance of C02 and liquid, ...


5

It's likely just naming differences. Though the BJCP has distinct categories for "Dark American Lager" and "Schwarzbier (Black Beer)". The main difference seems to be that Dark lager is sweeter and more towards caramel malt than Black which is more dry and slightly roasty.


5

Ales and lagers are brewed with different types of yeast. Ale yeast ferments at the top of the brewing vat at a comfortable room temperature while lager yeast ferments at the bottom of the vat at a lower temperature. The "low and slow" lager fermentation brings out more complex flavors.


5

Let's start off with beers that you're interested in, something akin to a black lager. I'm going to keep things focused on beer styles rather than particulars, since I do not know where you are nor what might be available for you. Dunkelweizen This is a dark wheat beer with characteristics of a traditional wheat with caramel type flavors joining the mix. ...


5

It's just marketing. Lager fermentations are very clean so it tends to be a beer you want to drink in a warm and humid climate. The breweries want to make beer that will sell very well locally, and that just happens to be lagers. At a commercial scale brewers are investing in temperature control regardless of ale or lager, so it's not a significant ...


5

I think it would be right to say that lagers were discovered rather than invented. Lager yeast is apparently the result of an unlikely mating of ale yeast and a wild yeast from South America. It's ability to ferment at lower temperatures probably led to its establishment in some brewery in some cold part of Bohemia centuries ago. According to Wikipedia, ...


4

Yes Coffee Lagers exist. Some call them Coffee Beer as a generic name for all styles of Coffee Beer. As the name suggests, this can be either a lager or ale with coffee added to boost flavor. While stouts and porters are popular base styles for coffee beer, many craft breweries are experimenting with other styles, like cream ales and India pale ales. ...


3

There are several ways to make a non-alcoholic beer (which BTW is not alcohol free. These beers can have .5% ABV). Boiling off the alcohol at 175f degrees, vacuum distillation at 120f degrees and reverse osmosis filters. They all take a toll on flavor and mouthfeel. Here is a great article: The most common way that alcohol is removed from beer is ...


3

You should definitely all use the same beer as the base, and you want a beer that has a good balance of hops and malt. The less flavor the beer has, the more the "spiked" flavors and aromas will stand out. Too much aromatic hops (e.g., an IPA) will mask the aromas. Too much malt will mask the flavors. A lighter, neutral beer is the way to go for an ...


3

The primary difference is the yeast used to ferment the beer -- ales use yeasts strains which work at a warmer temperature (10-25 deg C) than lager yeasts strains (7-15 deg C). You may hear the terms "top-fermenting" for ale yeasts and "bottom-fermenting" for lagers, but I think that's more-or-less happen-stance -- the yeasts themselves are not inclined ...


3

When I visited Stella Artois brewery in Leuven (Belgium), they told us that they distributed the same beer in two kind of bottles. In brown reusable simply etiqueted bottles for distribution inside Belgium (note that it is a regular beer, the most drunk in Belgium), and in green more fancier etiqueted bottles with "imported" insciption on it for distribution ...


3

I grew up in Belgium, near the town of Leuven where Stella was originally brewed. The classic Belgian beers all have their characteristic glass shapes, which are a part of the experience of the beer. Duvel, Kwak, Mort Subite and the rest come in glasses of various shapes and sizes. The traditional Stella Artois glass was a straight, narrow-ish glass, ...


3

That is possible to a level, but not proven, and probably does not make a huge difference, as there are many factors causing hangover, some stronger than others. Moreover, that would be saying that all commercial beers have the same effects and all local brewed ales have the same other (better) effect, which sounds to me very simple and convenient to ...


2

Yes, they contain adjuncts which aren't malted barley to make them cheaper to produce. These adjuncts aren't the same type of sugar so are fermented differently than maltose.


2

While I was in Germany, you had pretty much two common choices of beer available from the local brewery: Pils and Export. They were quite different, with Pils being lighter in color and taste and Export being darker and a little heavier flavor. They were in the same colored glass bottle with different labels. They are obviously two different beers. The name ...


2

List of ibu's: Stella: 30 Kronenbourg 1664: 20 Corona: 10 Fosters: 12 Becks: 20 Heineken: 23 San Miguel: 12 The difference in IBU seems to come from the type of beer, Heineken en Becks are quite similar european lagers with the same ingredients(barly, yeast water and hops) while Corona uses corn and rice with much les hops. Grohlier already gave a good ...


2

Finding a compiled list of common-marketplace lagers is probably not going to happen unless someone has made a specific list like this. Generally, you would just search "SPECIFIC BEER IBU" and either the result or website where you can find the result would populate. You can also look at homebrewer clone-recipe sites like this that give you the IBUs and ...


2

I think the short answer to whether mainstream lagers taste different is no, not really. But this depends on how you define mainstream lagers. Different lager styles definitely taste different, but the reason mainstream lagers all taste the same is because they're all pretty much the same style of lager- American lager, and are all probably brewed in a ...


2

Lagers tend to be more popular as they taste better colder, and are 'easier drinking' than heavier, more flavourful beers, and taste good very cold or with ice, so better for quenching thirst in the heat. That said, stouts and darker heavier beers are often popular in rural areas in tropical Asia where ice is unavailable - think ABC Extra Stout, Beer Laos ...


1

Two types of beers might suit you, both are similar but with slightly different flavour profiles. English mild ale has a lower alcoholic content than bitter or Guinness, generally dark coloured. Theakstons make a particularly nice mild on an irregular basis. Scottish 60 shilling (60/-) or light beer is similar to mild but is generally slightly sweeter to ...


1

This does indeed happen to me, too. So I stopped drinking beer where the ingredients aren't listed or if I think the beer is likely to contain GMO. Call me a tree hugger I don't care;-) I remember reading the head aches may come from fusel oils, which are byproducts of fermentation. Depending on the ingredients there may be more or less of them. I remember ...


1

A black lager, or perhaps a schwarzbier, really is a lager. Aside from the difference in the fermentation process, there will be some difference in your base ingredients, as a schwarzbier will focus less on the chocolates or coffee flavor of a stout. I suspect you may find significantly more information in homebrew.stackexchange.com, as hunse suggests. We ...


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