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30

TL DR; No. Beer flavor changes over time (hops fade away, oxidation takes hold, etc.), and this process happens more quickly at warmer temperatures than colder ones. But there are no additional chemical reactions caused by temperature changes, so warming to room temperature and re-chilling multiple times is not going to have any added effects on the beer. ...


13

This is a broad question, notably regarding the differences between IPAs and Double IPAs, but here's an overview focusing on the naming (and misconceptions thereof) and brewing of variants. Double IPA vs. Imperial IPA (IIPA) First, the Double IPA is also known as an Imperial IPA (IIPA). You can think of the "double" as referring to the two letter I's :-) ...


11

WHITE IPA A basic definition would be: strong hop character - similar to ipa wheat / wit grainbill- essentially a mashup (beer pun) of wit and ipa, lighter malts with strong hops As far as the is it an IPA question: as long as its fairly high alcohol, most of the ingredients would point to being almost the same as an IPA. but like noted above, there are ...


11

Although as Bill said it can be down to a persons chemistry. One reason for you finding that IPAs affect you more could be the higher hop content in a Pale Ale (IPAs in particular). Hops (the oils) can have an effect on brain chemistry, that affect can be positive or it can be negative! Some people can actually have alergic reactions to hops, or even beer ...


11

First, it's important to note that the boil time is not the only thing that increases with each of those beers. Dogfish Head continually hops during the boil, and the boil extracts the alpha acids from the hops, giving the beer bitterness, so a longer boil with more hops results in a wort that is more bitter. Here is where the additional alcohol comes in: ...


9

As a complete novice to food pairings with beer, I've been looking at this nifty pairing chart on http://www.craftbeer.com [PDF] whenever pairing questions have come up on Beer.SE. According to it, the suggested pairing for an IPA is Strong, spicy food (classic with curry!); bold, sweet desserts like carrot cake and for a Double/Imperial IPA is Smoked ...


8

DIPAs generally have a high enough ABV (7%+) to age for a few months...but you probably don't want to. Most contemporary IPAs and DIPAs are best drank within 3 weeks from the date of bottling. Stone's "Enjoy By" Series gives you 5 weeks to drink the IPA if properly refrigerated. Super hop-bursted IPAs with a ton of aroma like Heady Topper recommend to ...


7

Repeatedly cooling and warming (to ambient temperatures) a beer can induce a permanent haze, where proteins and tannins bond to create semi-soluble molecules. While this can have an aesthetic impact, it does not impact flavour, aroma or mouthfeel. This is mostly an issue in beers where the knocking-out, or rapid cooling of the beer may not have been ...


7

Answer to the easiest part of the question: Yes, IPAs (India Pale Ales) are beers. Unfortunately, there isn't a clear and concise answer to the rest of you question. Let's assume, for the sake of argument, that by "regular beer", you mean Budweiser. Budweiser sits at 5% ABV. IPAs are often in the 5-7% ABV range, so let's call an "average" IPA 6%. You will ...


7

A bit obvious, but it's just about more malt and hops (which results in higher ABV and IBU levels, off course). Particularly, I don't see it becoming a new style, as our palate has a limit when it comes to tasting bitterness and even smelling hop oils. I think we have already reached this limit sometime ago when Imperial IPAs were conceived. So, anything ...


6

I would say some are sweeter, some aren't. Brewers do kick up the mount of malt in IIPA's to get the ABV up there. This could lead to a sweeter taste depending on the malt bill and fermentation.


6

I think there are three main reasons. 1) Direct production costs. Dogfish declares adding hops for two hours, and this has a cost you need to pay (more hops, more time) 2) Alcohol content. Taxes may depend on ABV (for minimum rate of excise duty on beer in the EU, see here). The higher is the ABV, the higher is the tax. 3) Marketing. The beer is a very ...


5

I did some experimentation at home to answer this question. My results indicated that room temperature and temperature fluctuation had no impact on flavour. Very high temperature (140° for 24 hours) seems to create a very slight hard to define harshness. Check out my results here: Beer Experiments: Sunlight Exposure and Temperature Regulation Beer ...


5

The beer judge certification program style guides seem to imply they are the same. You can get more details at bjcp.org. The text below is from the 2015 guidelines double IPA category, 22A. Comments: A showcase for hops, yet remaining quite drinkable. The adjective “double" is arbitrary and simply implies a stronger version of an IPA; “imperial,” “extra,...


5

Most often, if you see IPA, it's an "India pale ale". "Imperial pale ale" is an informal, descriptive style (i.e., a strong pale ale), whereas "india pale ale" is a BJCP recognized style. India pale ales are primarily understood as a hopped-up version of a pale ale, made to withstand long travels. Beers with an "imperial" nomenclature (typically ...


4

CHEESE! Extremely sharp cheddar is best. A sharp Vermont or New York white cheddar will do as well. My personal favorite is Tillamook Special Reserve Extra Sharp.


4

Generally speaking, Indian Pale Ale is not a type of beer you would typically find in Germany, and, as you hinted at, many Germans do not even know IPA. Furthermore, at least to my knowledge, none of the different styles prevalent in Germany (basically, bock and doppelbock are just beers with higher alcohol content and gravity) is a real alternative to IPA. ...


4

I've had it and I would say it's not really worth going out of your way for it. It's been overhyped, in my opinion, and while it's a good beer I don't think it's really as mind-breakingly good as many others seem to think. I believe this discrepancy arises from the fact that Heady Topper is a relatively well balanced IPA. It has the hops bitterness to it ...


4

Is there any standard that differentiates an XPA from other American pale ales? Currently, no. According to the latest Beer Judge Certification Program guidelines (the drafted 2015 style guide http://www.bjcp.org/docs/2015_Guidelines_Beer.pdf), there is no category of XPA or Extra Pale Ale. Stylistically, depending on the malt bill used, one would ...


4

To be classified as a double IPA it must have an ABV >= 7.5%. That requires more malt/sugar. However, the perceived sweetness can be a factor from yeast used and the Bitterness Ratio: http://www.madalchemist.com/chart_bitterness_ratio.html


3

From their website, it looks like they only distribute around Connecticut. If you are really interested in pursuing it, acheong87's recommendation of finding someone to trade with may be your best bet.


3

Sorry for the late response, but as I look on the internet for discussions concerning this topic I ran across this question. In the mid 1800's in England, IPA's were created and produced for multiple reasons. Long story short, as Europe was going through a technology renaissance period, ingredients used for brewing changed and grains that were converted ...


3

Cured meats - the saltiness of the meat and bitterness in the IPA play well together.


3

São Paulo has seen a big rise in the craft beer scene through the last years (as does the whole country), so you'll probably find what you're looking for. The city doesn't have an actual (physical) brewery of its own (besides brewpubs, which are only a few, the most relevant being Cervejaria Nacional), once most of them are in the countryside of São Paulo ...


3

I would argue that an overcarbonated IPA is still an IPA. IPAs are characterized by the intense hoppy aroma, a malt backbone, and color. The carbonation level isn't referred to in style guides, generally. Beer Advocate's IPA Style Guide Ratebeer's IPA Style Guide What I believe you're doing is creating a slightly more sour IPA. With more dissolved CO2 in ...


2

As stated many times above, it's very personal on what affects you and how much or how little. Dry-hopped beers seem to give me worse hangovers. Also, 13 of the big bottles of Franziskaner in a night makes me want to die the next day.


2

I agree with the other answers: IPA's are not really intended to be aged like a barleywine. However, the style was historically brewed to survive the long journey by ship from England to India. So while they might lose some the freshness and hop volatiles over time, you can certainly keep them for many months and they will still be very drinkable. (Assuming, ...


2

I live in Vermont and I've had quite a few cans of Heady Topper and some from cask. I really love Heady Topper and I haven't yet had another DIPA that tastes similar. First, it's not that expensive. It's $3.75 for a 16 oz can. $14 for a 4-pack. You can get it at local bars, pubs, and restaurants for $5/can. Around $78 for a case (24 x 16oz cans). Compared to ...


2

Cooling and warming a beer does have an effect, but it is minor in the beginning. If you heat, cool, repeatedly many times, there will be evidence of damage and it will become staggeringly obvious! At Budweizer they gave us a beer that was cycled over a 100 times! It was shocking how many off-flavours such a delicately flavoured beer can get!


2

From the looks of it they sell their beers on rotation in their own bottle shop: We are just a humble micro brewery producing small batches of beer. Often times people develop a love affair with one particular beer (Roman Candle fanatics tend to be the most assertive!), but we brew over 50 styles in a year! With only 9 fermentors this ultimately means ...


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