Hot answers tagged

13

For the same reason that root beer floats behave in a similar fashion. Even though there is less carbonation than in root beer (and I presume similarly less foam, though still a significant quantity) the irregular surface of the ice cream offers a massively larger number of nucleation sites than the smooth glass of your favorite beer vessel. These ...


12

Yes, beer is indeed generally supposed to have a head. The foam can add to both the flavor and the texture of your beer. It is preference for sure, and if you don't like it, then you don't like it, but I'd encourage you to try it from time to time with an open mind. The head of a beer is quite complex, consisting of proteins that are acted on by the hops, ...


7

Generally, washing and rinsing properly first time should mean this problem doesn't happen. If it does, vinegar is an excellent residue remover. Rinse the glass fully in clean water (no soap). Rub the glass with a small sponge soaked in vinegar Rinse again That should solve the problem.


5

There are some good answers here, but to distill and maybe enhance: Beer heads are a great indication of proper serving because if any number of factors that could affect the taste are off, they'll also affect the head. Some of these are: Warm beer foams too much. If your server is dumping tons of head down the drain to fill your glass with enough beer, ...


4

Beer is typically supposed to have a head of about 1/2 inch. This enhances the flavor and gives off an aroma that will add to the experience. A good bartender should give you a nice head on your beer unless you ask for your beer sans head. You should not be getting a glass half full of foam. Some brewers (I know Guinness specifically, but I'm sure there are ...


4

I can think of three possible impacts this scheme might have on a keg of beer. Since the keg is kept at room temperature, if the beer is unpasteurized the flavor will evolve at a faster rate than refrigerated beer would. This isn't a change due to the quick cooling, per se, but it is a possibly major difference. As mentioned by @acheong, the CO2 ...


4

As long the beer's sealed, there should be no difference in taste due to rapid or slow cooling. Lowering the temperature only increases the solubility of CO2, which should dissolve later. Temperature itself does impact taste, supposedly due to our taste buds being number in cold, hiding certain flavors (which can be desirable or undesirable depending on the ...


4

Soap is absolutely the worst thing you could do I guess :P. Sometimes I notice that badly dried glasses (with soap rests) produce more foam... In general, make sure your glass is spotlessly clean. You could then either leave it dry or make it a little wet, works sometimes... Keep your glass diagonal to make sure the liquid touches the glass almost parallel ...


2

I had an opportunity to visit the Heineken Brewery on a trip to Amsterdam. During my tour, our bartender was able to give a succinct and general answer: to protect the beer, it's flavor and aroma. If you like, you can read more about foam physics and the importance of foam in this dated WSJ article: http://www.rpi.edu/dept/chem-eng/Biotech-Environ/FOAM/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible