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In 2001, Florida State Senator Tom Lee championed a bill which was passed that allowed for more sizes of beer containers to be sold in Florida. Prior to the bill passing, only 12 ounce, 16 ounce or 32 ounce packaging was allowed. This prevented most craft beers from entering the state and to allow those entry, the law enacted stated that anything under 32 ...


11

Supposedly washing your hair with it has some nice effects, and people have found other creative uses: How to make good use of flat, leftover beer from your Christmas party. However, if it is only a few days old and has been in the fridge, it's unlikely that it's done much more than go completely flat, so any use that doesn't require it to be carbonated ...


8

It isn't that half-gallon growlers are specifically illegal as such, but more of a quirk of how the different types and sizes of legal containers are defined. The Florida laws governing beer (or more accurately "malt beverage") container sizes specify that: Individual containers of malt beverage sold or offered for sale shall be no larger than 32 ...


7

They can, provided that they: Cover up existing labels Add their own label containing the brewery name, beer name, and abv. Are a brewery (bars and retailers cannot). You're not alone in being confused, though. A lot of breweries didn't really know either, and as a result decided not to, just to be safe. Further complicating the issue is that many ...


7

In my experience, many recipes that call for beer either work fine with flat beer or call for it that way. Examples include chili, fish poached in beer, and some stews. I would be reluctant to use it for bread unless the recipe calls for a "normal" amount of yeast, though. Some recipes seem to rely on the yeast in the beer and others add bread yeast, ...


6

Cooking with beer is always a good decision, and stouts are a prime choice. Since it doesn't matter if they're a little flat, why not try some? Beef and Guinness Stew Cheese and beer soup Chocolate stout brownies Beer battered anything


6

I've had the best luck using brown or dark glass growlers. Glass is one of the most inert food-storage materials. The effect on taste of beer from different material containers is similar to the effect that drinking water from different material containers has. Using metal can sometimes impart a flavor to the beer, though medical-grade (316) stainless steel ...


6

The biggest impact tends to be the color of the container. Green and clear bottles let in more of the harmful light that spoils the beer. The darker the container, the better. Plastic also lends itself to being scratched if re-used (which most growlers are). Even powdered cleaners with soft cloths can scratch the plastic (if the cleaner isn't disolved well ...


6

It appears that there may be several laws in play here, but perhaps the interpretation of those laws by the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission, the brewers, and the Mass Brewers Guild that determine how growler fills work in practice. The first law in question is the regulation on labeling. Nothing in there appears to prevent brewers ...


5

I'd definitely say cook with it as others have mentioned. You're really just trying to impart some of the beer flavors into the food; you don't really need a fresh beer to do that as carbonation doesn't affect the flavor, it affects the mouth-feel. The carbonation from a fresh beer would be lost in cooking anyway. If it's only been 2 days, it probably hasn't ...


3

Unfortunately, there's not much one can do, at least using only household products. While filling, using a counterpressure bottle filler would maximize the longevity of the beer as well as filling the beer while it's very cold, near its freezing point ~29 degrees F (so that its CO2 is maximally dissolved), if you have a choice in the matter (likely not). ...


3

Making it into a marinade for steaks would work. Depending on the type of beer, I would also consider using it for boiling sausages/bratwurst with it. Though I find that the darker beers are the best for this.


2

Here is what the PA Liquor Control Board has to say: PA LCB answer to legality of selling growlers In a nutshell, a growler is an open container, but it is up to the local police or state police to decide whether or not to enforce the law. My guess is that if the growler is full and out of your easy reach, you are probably OK unless you have given the cop ...


2

It's not quite the South Bay but close. I've seen them fill growlers that do not have their name on them. Steelhead Brewing Company 333 California Dr Burlingame, CA 94010 United States If you like IPAs or APAs, the Bombay Bomber and the Double Play are worth a try.


1

My favorite place to fill up a growler is Hopdogma near Half Moon Bay. It's worth the drive up from San Jose or down from San Francisco on a beautiful day. You can see the ocean from the bar as well and it's a great place to have a pint!


1

Most places (generally everywhere and certainly in Bay Area) allow only their own growlers to be filled with their beer. Thus if you buy a Growler from ISO Beers, they will not fill it at Original Gravity 2 blocks away (both very decent places). It is just not good business - they want you to come in and pay premium on their single draft beers. So if you ...


1

I've seen a lot of people commenting to cook with it , which is my advice , but I haven't seen someone speaking about crepes. I don't know if we only do this here (france) but I've always used beer to make crepes and it's realy great. I recently thought about using strong flavored beers (like dark ones) but didn't try it yet so if you try it soon a feedback ...


1

Another option is to make your own malt vinegar. You can just put a piece of cheesecloth over the top (with the cap removed), or you could add a little vinegar mother, like from the bottom of a "natural" bottle of vinegar, and it will turn it to vinegar for you.


1

You could use it to make steak and ale pie, this works particularly well with darker beers. Although you don't need much - about 1 cup / 220ml.


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