10

There are no alcoholic beverages made from the "nectar" of flowers per se. It would be very difficult/expensive to collect 100% flower nectar straight from flowers in sufficient quantities to make a beverage. Having said that, honey is essentially flower nectar collected by bees and regurgitated in the hive as a future food source. You can enjoy fermented ...


5

The many varieties of fermented milks from around the world which are distinguished by the type and specificity of the microorganisms used for fermentation, by preserving fresh animal milk (e.g. cow, goat, sheep, mare, buffalo, camel or yak). Dahi from India is a type of set yoghurt made from cow or buffalo milks which contains bacteria like L.lactis subsp....


4

There is a beer called Honeysuckle Smash by Three Brothers Brewing This is a golden ale made in North Yorkshire and you can buy it straight from their website here.


4

You can make alcohol from anything that contains sugar, so... Yes, of course you can make alcohol from kiwano melon, using the same technique as with any melon (or in fact most fruit) - get the juice from it and use your normal moonshine technique :-)


3

It's difficult to answer why fermentation did not complete without further information. It's quite possible the sugar content was too high and pH to low for whatever yeast was added to survive and begin fermentation. Vinegar however is created when bacteria that produce acetic acid are present in an environment with a sugar source and oxygen. They will ...


3

Your biggest worry with an open fermentor is contamination. If you've added potassium or sodium metabisulfide to the wine must, you should be safe against most wine spoiling bacteria. However, it is advisable to cover the fermentation vessel. See this post about open fermentation.


3

As for butter Many white wines undergo a process that causes them to take on buttery flavors (which sometimes come across as buttered popcorn or even butterscotch). That process is called malo-lactic fermentation, and here's the quick take on how it works. Just after the grapes are made into wine, a special type of beneficial bacteria is added to the ...


2

They are shooting for a bottle conditioned beer which means the beer ferments a little bit in the bottle, trapping the co2 and carbonating the beer "naturally". I doubt they are putting sugar directly in the bottle, but probably putting the sugar in the beer and then putting it in the bottle. This way the sugar dissolves more evenly and gives a more ...


2

I brew in South Florida with similar ambient temps during the spring-summer-autumn. For beer styles, check out the saison, which enjoys a higher fermentation temperature. Wyeast 3724 has a temperature range of 70-95F, 21-35C and attenuates up to 80%. I've had great success with this strain, even at the higher ends of the range. Beer and Wine Journal has a ...


2

That is really too warm as you will get fusel oils as a bi-product. If you absolutely must do it in that high of a temperature, I would go with an ESB or something. If you really are going to get into this, you may want to invest in an old refrigerator and maintain around 17 - 20 degrees for an ale. Well worth the investment if you have the space and ...


2

Camel's milk is fermented in many places. Here and here is some info for you. Ewan McGregor and Charlie Boreman drank it in Mongolia during the filming of The Long Way Round. It was warmed over a stove that was fueled by camel dung, which apparently gave it an 'earthy' taste. In Kazakhstan it’s known as 'Shubat' - and you can buy it in the supermarkets. ...


2

I was a professional wine maker for a few years. We always used open top fermenters on our red wines when they were fermenting on the skins, we just threw sheets or blankets over them to keep the bugs out. Of course we are talking about tons of grapes at a time. White wines you could do this too, but I would only as long as there is active fermentation and ...


2

There is banana beer and there is banana wine made from Cavendish bananas, but they are not the same thing! What is banana beer? Banana beer is an alcoholic beverage made from fermentation of mashed bananas. Sorghum, millet or maize flour are added as a source of wild yeast. And there is a difference with banana wine. Banana wine is a fruit wine made ...


2

There are several categories of organic compounds that are responsible for aromas - esters, ketones, and aldehydes are the most notable. Esters are formed when an alcohol and an acid combine; creating esters is a common laboratory experiment in high-school chemistry - I remember making peppermint and banana. This is the actual compound responsible for ...


1

Check with your local mycological society in your area. If it grows wild near you. You can buy grow kits and try to grow it indoors. But the mycological society is probably your best bet for finding it wild or a supplier that you can get it from.


1

Enlightenment wines meadery makes a dandelion wine- it’s also made with honey but there are dozens of flowers in every bottle. EWM site


1

I always cover with a tea towel and tie it round the rim with string, still allows it to breathe and fights off nearly all air borne infections. You are right about the fact fermentation will be faster with the lid open, be wary of the fact it can happen to fast - if its bubbling a lot then you would be better to decrease the heat that the pan is sitting on, ...


1

If the aerator top is still working, meaning that no air has gotten to the wine, you should still be able to bottle it. The best way to know is to taste it. If it tastes right, you should be fine.


1

The recommended primary fermentation time for anything you're going to bottle is: until it's done. After 2-3 weeks, when you think it's ready, use a wine thief to pull a sample to test with a hydrometer. Record that number. Then wait maybe 3 days and do it again. Compare the new number to the first number. If they're the same, you're safe. If they're ...


1

(I'm assuming here you mean spontaneous fermentation, used originally in belgian lambics. Open fermentation is the practice of fermenting in an open vessel but in a controlled environment, not allowing other microorganisms to get in, like Anchor and Sierra Nevada still do these days, and sometime ago very common in the industry.) You will probably never get ...


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