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24

The Quotation Firstly, I shall examine the passage in the original Greek: ἔσται γὰρ μέγας ἐνώπιον τοῦ Κυρίου, καὶ οἶνον καὶ σίκερα οὐ μὴ πίῃ, καὶ Πνεύματος Ἁγίου πλησθήσεται ἔτι ἐκ κοιλίας μητρὸς αὐτοῦ. The two words we are intereted in here are 'οἶνον' ('wine'), and 'σίκερα' ('strong drink'). The second ('σίκερα') is interested in that it is a loan ...


12

Beer can make you gain weight by three means, but you shall NOT pursue it ! First is alcohol, which is a byproduct of the fermentation of starch by yeast. Starch is a carbohydrate, and it has it's own nutriting quality, including energy. Its energy is transferred to alcohol. If the energy it carries is not used by basal metabolism or physical activity, it'...


7

There were two types of drinks back in that time. Beer and Wine. Both hardly resembled what they are today. Beer was very weak, under 4% alcohol, while wine was probably in the normal range of 12-14%. Distilling had not been invented by the Muslims until 700 A.D. (anno Domini). If I apply Occam's Razor here, I would say that it's wine and probably a higher ...


6

Surely mead, honey wine, should be considered. Okay, I had to google this one: Wiki says that residual evidence has been found in northern Chinese pottery vessels dating from 6500–7000 BC, and in Europe in the ceramics of the Bell Beaker Culture (c. 2800–1800 BC). Wiki goes on to tell us that, contemporaneous to John the Baptist, Greeks and Romans were ...


6

This isn't specific to alcohol, and is instead a general mechanism of neural association. When you consume anything and then become sick afterward your brain associates sickness with what you consumed to stop you from consuming it again. From an evolutionary standpoint this makes sense, because it would keep you safe from continuing to eat or drink the ...


4

In the History and Taxonomy of Distilled Spirits There is ample evidence that distilled spirits were available during the time period you mentioned in a variety of places. We know that that Greek Alchemists developed the distillation processes about 1 AD and that a true distillation process was developed in Italy in the 1200s at the School of Salerno and ...


4

As you said, many of the traditions like salt & lime are primarily used to disguise low-quality tequila and mezcal. If you're buying a reposado, añejo, or aged mezcal, you'll want to get the full aroma and flavor. The colder the drink, the less aroma you get. Room temperature is recommended by most distilleries. Using a snifter glass, as Jedicurt ...


3

Thought I would add my own answer to this fine list of excellent answers. Goose is, of course, stronger-flavoured than turkey - more like game but - crucially - quite a bit fattier which makes it essential in my book to look for a wine that has a fair level of acidity. It also tends to be accompanied by powerfully flavoured accompaniments such as ...


3

The British used the Imperial system of measures from 1824 and India was part of the British Empire until 1947. 1 British Imperial fluid ounce is equal to 28.41 ml, which is close to 30 ml. Maybe this practice evolved from the specification that 1 peg equaled 1 imp. oz. and was rounded up to 30-ml after metrification. Standard Indian-made liquor is ...


3

You seem to be asking two questions, I'll try to answer both although a lot of this is conjecture: Why are spirits in India poured in multiples of 30ml? This is likely due to 30ml being easy to both measure out and to drink. 30 ml is pretty standard world-wide as a small or single measure, and multiplying a small measure (rather than have, say, 30ml ...


2

As a nod to my Canadian ancestry, both the French and Scot, I'd consider: Wine: a red, such as Bordeaux, and it still makes the long Atlantic crossing in perfect condition Mulled wine: cinnamon, cloves, oranges, or Caribou with the extras tossed in Rum: soldiers and their rations; a toddy or hot rum punch would go nicely Cider: Quebec, need I say more? ...


2

I think you need something that is kind of big, but has the acid to cut through the goose fat and clear you palate when you take a sip. To that end I would suggest a Riesling, but not some whimpy sweet Riesling from Germany. I would suggest a really nice Grand Cru Riesling from the Alsace. They have power to cut through the flavor, yet don't weigh you down ...


2

My favorite Hi Ball of all Time is Vernor's(an obscure, potent ginger all type soda) and whiskey. Two powerful flavors that manage to keep their potency while still blending very well. As a general rule for all of these Using a 12oz glass, I would pour 1.5 oz of liquor with 4.5oz soda directly over ice- stir gently. Drink with a full sized straw. ...


2

If you want something sweet you can try amaretto and coke (some more detailed information) for an even sweeter experience you can even go for a mix with Dr pepper It has a slimier taste to a bakewell tart so it is recommended if you like sweet things


2

I would go with what I call a "Bloody Juanita": Tequila with Sangrita (tomato based). For Mexican food, Tequila (or Mescal) is the obvious choice. You could go the US way and make some margaritas, but to me that sounds boring (and ideally needs a margarita machine, or at least decent amounts of ice, which is not always available, if you are on a boat or ...


2

The Vesper Martini was first described by James Bond in Ian Fleming's book Casino Royale in 1953. The recipe is: "Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon-peel."


2

I tend to think of drinks with scary names. Specifically you could serve Zombie Dust from 3 Floyds Brewing which has the advantage of being a really excellent beer. A Google search for "Halloween themed beer" will yield several articles with similarly scary named beers such as here and here. Lastly, there is the Pumpkin Ale beer style.


2

Several suggestions: On a fresh egg, remove the chalazae, the ropey bit in the white (it anchors the yolk); Use either pasteurized egg whites or powdered egg whites; Add ice only after the mixture has become foamy and voluminous; Use a finer mesh strainer (if bits are getting through your shaker strainer).


2

The use of brown sugar in Europe must give the cachaça a taste of sugarcane. Industrially produced cachaça often doesn't have it. The problem is that brown sugar can be made of beta and it doesn't have taste of sigarcane either. And it dissolves slower than white sugar so the drink becomes sweet when it's almost finished. Source: German Wikipedia.


1

It's a good question, maybe an answer is on the fact the white sugar in Europe is not producted with cane but beet or other source. In Brazil white sugar used in caipirinha is made with cane. Infact there is a big difference when used brown sugar. Crushed ice is not a good option because it dissolve too fast and the caipirinha became a lemon juice.


1

Chicago bartender here. Try adding your egg whites to one half of the shaker and your pisco and citrus to the other. Dry shake first. Then add ice and shake for 20 seconds. Double strain through a mesh strainer.


1

The world of Harry Potter has spawned an entire universe of beverages, both with and without alcohol, including those served at Universal Studios theme parks, and many independently-inspired creations. Eater Miami describes Everything You Need to Eat and Drink at The Wizarding World of Harry Potter by Olee Fowler (May 27, 2016) (emphasis added). Non-...


1

Star Trek Saurian Brandy. This is a fake drink, along with Klingon Blood Wine and Romulan Ale, that have been recreated in the real world.


1

Of course there are! 'associated with' allows for a great deal of latitude. In fact, just in beer itself, there are several beers that are associated with, but not directly a result of, religious customs. Lenten beers are an entire category in and of themselves, but since you don't really want to hear about the giant selection of Bocks and their variety of ...


1

According to this link Pastafarians have many holidays dedicated to alcoholic beverages including daiquiri day, Vodka day, wine day, lager day and many, many more.


1

OK, I am giving two answers to this after I thought about it. If you REALLY want to stay super traditional to the spirit of the day and dig deep into your English roots, you would have some a nice medieval beer, or nice Mead and/or some type of cider. Unless you were royalty, you wouldn't have access to wine from France. All of the above would be a great ...


1

A very interesting one is Ciroc Peach with 7-Up/Sprite. Tastes like fuzzy peach juice. You can mix 7-Up/Sprite with any of the other flavors of Cioc(or any flavored vodka if we generalize) but I find Peach the best for my personal tastes.


1

7 & 7 is popular Seven Up and Seagrams 7 Crown


1

If you include Central and South America, there is a beverage that is still made today called Chicha In South and Central America, chicha is a fermented or non-fermented beverage usually derived from maize.1[need quotation to verify] Chicha includes corn beer known as chicha de jora and non-alcoholic beverages such as chicha morada. Archaeobotanists have ...


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