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Is peaty whiskey made in other parts of the world besides Islay? The short answer is yes. Here are five examples from around the world: 5 Smoky World Whiskies Challenging Scotch When the topic of smoky whisky comes up in a bar it’s usually in association with Scotland, and more so, the famed isle of Islay. From Lagavulin to Bowmore, Islay enjoys a ...


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There is nothing different about the distillation of rum. Just like with whiskey, brandy, vodka, etc. no sugar comes off the still. What does happen a lot in the rum industry is the post distillation addition of rum, as referenced in Eric's answer (the author at Alcademics - Camper English - has done a lot of research on sugar in rums). Sugar can have ...


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Having owned and run a winery for 15 years (as well as making the wine, it was a small operation), you should concentrate on Sales, Marketing and Distribution about 90% of your effort. You could bottle paint thinner and with the right sales team and marketing you could make tons of money. I've seen it in the wine industry many times. People will say "if you ...


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The type of still used is significant. Vodka is distilled using a fractioning column or reflux still as described here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractionating_column With a fractioning column, the answer is: none of the flavour comes from the original fermentation. There is no flavour (sort of....) Here's what a commercial one looks like: Or a home ...


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Speaking of safety: don't forget about methanol: A simple (but effective) rule of thumb for this is to throw away the first 50 mL you collect (per 20 L mash used) for a reflux still. If using a potstill, make it more like 100-200 mL. Do this, and you have removed all the hazardous foreshots, including the methanol.


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For small-batch home distillation, hypothetically, a large (24 qt.) stainless steel stockpot makes an economical and effective pot still for 5 gal. batches. You will need a large stainless salad bowl of equal diameter, which when inverted makes an ideal lid. A hole in the top center of the inverted salad bowl for installation of a threaded boss, for ...


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The Illegality issue is rooted in the sale of illegal substances AND/OR not paying Taxes on substances used. The BIG issue for anyone is Fire and Explosion. These problems kill or maim people and destroy property. However, edification is useful: These two Google Search Links should be a good start to orient your understanding of the distillation of solvents....


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Don't do it in your home. Set it up 40+ feet from you home in the open or covered shed with open walls. I have a BS in chemical engineering but an alcohol still is pretty basic. Creating the mash is the harder part. There are many kits on the Internet. Don't get in a hurry and heat it too fast.


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The biggest risk during distillation is boiling over the pot and having flammable liquid run into an open flame. I've heard of stills in the NW United States that use steam as a heat source instead of some sort of open flame. I'm not sure of the logistics, the creation of the steam might be in another room for example and pumped into the room with the ...


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In the sour mash process, the distillers beer is distilled, and a portion of the spent beer is added to the next batch. Many organic acids are not very volatile, so they will remain in the spent beer. Adding this to the sweet mash will add free amino nitrogen and organic acids to the sweet mash. Yeast likes a slightly acidic environment, and many bacteria ...


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This - kind of - answers your question. The breakdown of sour mashing in beer cannot be too different. The article linked explains the process with amazing detail. Here are some pertinent highlights: Sour mashing requires only a small deviation from your normal routine and has three goals: 1. Create an optimal environment for Lactobacillus. 2. Prevent ...


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I don't have any prior knowledge so I Googled the answer. According to this site and this other site, sugar doesn't make it past distillation. However, sugar is often added after distillation in rum.


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As the previous answer says: 'yes'. You don't need to go very far from Islay to find peaty whisky: they're making it on Jura (which is about 250m away across the Sound of Jura from Port Askaig), and all over Scotland. However, lots of folks are importing their peat and/or peated barley from Scotland, as there's not much of a tradition of peating outside of ...


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Actually, yes. Though usually not with essential oils. In most cases, as an infusion. For low-alcohol beverages: punch, some dry-hopped beers, vermouth For spirits: liqueur, gin, rumtopf, Chinese paojiu Compound gin is an example where essential oils might be used.


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No, this would destroy the wine/mash/beer that your were trying to remove the "head" from. Just to make the first pass in a still to remove this head, you would need to get the liquid up to around 200f to start the process, thereby destroying whatever your were trying to get the less desirable aspects out of it.


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Building a Good Distillation Tower . . . the down and dirty way: Glass column . . . fill with glass beads. Exit point ==> condensation coil. Why? The glass beads cause vapors to condense while being boiled off (lighter vapor rises higher up the column). And thus different alcohols are separated from each other without having to have a Super Tall tower....


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