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17

There is no culinary basis to make that generalization. The choice of beer (or wine or any other ingredient used to add depth) may be selected to enhance, balance, contrast, or even counteract one of the other ingredients. But that doesn't necessarily make it the beverage of choice to accompany the resulting dish. The beer-as-an-ingredient may not even be ...


11

Supposedly washing your hair with it has some nice effects, and people have found other creative uses: How to make good use of flat, leftover beer from your Christmas party. However, if it is only a few days old and has been in the fridge, it's unlikely that it's done much more than go completely flat, so any use that doesn't require it to be carbonated ...


8

Go for lower alcohol and less hoppy. Alcoholic drinks on meat can give great flavor, but the alcohol has a tendency to dry out said meat. Some form of malty session beer would be great to cook with, if you had any near you. Rauchbier would probably work well, since that smoke flavor would really enhance the meat, but drinking it with it might be too much. ...


7

It all depends on what you are making and what you are drinking! Some people reach for the cheap bottle that's in the door of the fridge when making a braise, where the wine will cook for a long time. Others use the type of wine you’d serve with dinner to make the dish. Even better, unless you’re pouring something rare or expensive, buy an extra bottle and ...


7

In my experience, many recipes that call for beer either work fine with flat beer or call for it that way. Examples include chili, fish poached in beer, and some stews. I would be reluctant to use it for bread unless the recipe calls for a "normal" amount of yeast, though. Some recipes seem to rely on the yeast in the beer and others add bread yeast, ...


6

Yes the alcohol cooks off but the flavor is not in the alcohol. If you would not drink it then don't cook with it. The flavor of the wine will come through. For me I do not cook with an expensive full body red as then just too much comes through. More about grape and just get a decent wine. Like Chardonnay with clams you would get some oak coming ...


6

Cooking with beer is always a good decision, and stouts are a prime choice. Since it doesn't matter if they're a little flat, why not try some? Beef and Guinness Stew Cheese and beer soup Chocolate stout brownies Beer battered anything


5

I'd definitely say cook with it as others have mentioned. You're really just trying to impart some of the beer flavors into the food; you don't really need a fresh beer to do that as carbonation doesn't affect the flavor, it affects the mouth-feel. The carbonation from a fresh beer would be lost in cooking anyway. If it's only been 2 days, it probably hasn't ...


4

The more expensive bit is not true, but the type of wine does make a dramatic difference to the taste imparted to your food. As an extreme example compare cooking a steak with a light white wine sauce to cooking it with a heavy Merlot. Even within a particular grape, there are differences in how full or heavy the taste is. So don't worry about the price (...


3

I used this recipe for Black Bean Soup with Roasted Poblano Chiles. It doesn't include beer as an ingredient but I chose this recipe as part of the beer/food pairing menu I put together for my parents. I decided to pair it with Out of the Ashes (Smoked Marzen) from Fort Collins Brewery. I poured about 1 1/2 cups of it into the soup while it was cooking. ...


3

Great question for the dessert enhancement front. Zabaglione is generally thought as sweet, however it can also be made without sugar, using dry wine and egg yolks, thus becoming a fine sauce for fish, chicken or vegetables. It is used this way in French cuisine as well as Italian. In Italy chefs and home cooks often measure the ingredients for ...


3

A saison would be the closest if you want "authenticity". This soup was usually a breakfast dish made with very weak farmhouse style ale often served to farm workers. The beers were locally brewed often by the farmers themselves. It only had about 3-4% abv so even today's commercial saisons have a bit more (5-8% abv). Sometimes kvas was used. Kvas is a light ...


3

Making it into a marinade for steaks would work. Depending on the type of beer, I would also consider using it for boiling sausages/bratwurst with it. Though I find that the darker beers are the best for this.


3

When cooking sweeter meats like brats or other sausages, I always use very malty beers, typically of the darker variety. Nut brown ales, dopplebock, stouts are favorites. Flank steak marinated in a combo of Newcastle Brown Ale, lots of red pepper flakes, garlic, lime juice, salt and pepper makes universally awesome fajita meat. If you're making sauces or ...


3

There are some stouts with cocoa in their recipes. Two that I like are Young's Double Chocolate Stout and Sadler's Mud City Stout, both available in bottles in the UK.


3

Guinness is in a style called "Dry Irish Stout", so anything on this list would probably substitute well. It sort of depends on what you felt was missing from the cake. We could work on narrowing it down to stouts that were stronger in those flavors. Oatmeal or milk stouts as styles would be sweeter than Guinness, some stouts might play up chocolate or ...


2

I made beer bagels several years ago, and the beer imparted a sort of sour dough flavor. Guinness ice cream was also delightful - http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/guinness-ice-cream-with-dark-chocolate-honey-sauce-recipe.html Beer batter onion rings also come out nicely, but I've never really tasted the beer after frying. That being said, ...


2

Alchermes could be a good hint, in Italy is used as an ingredient in Zuppa inglese, a particular derivation of trifle ...as you are trying to do. Just a reminder, i don't think is SO GOOD to drink it as a glass of wine, but perfect with desserts.


2

Please allow me to recommend a nice red classic Italian wine called Chianti. From this Wine and Cheese Pairing Guide we can see that Chianti is paired well to the Pecorino Romano Cheese and nuts. I know that you are using a Columella's Caciofiore cheese that is "considered a sort of "ancestor" of the Roman pecorino cheese, prepared with rennet based on ...


2

Since I can't comment yet, I need to use this answer box... I guess you could just create the exact same dish and leave out the meat or replace it by those vegetarian replacements (quorn etc.). I can imagine a beer stew would be epic without the meat but with more vegetables. I quickly looked up one of our Belgian dishes in a vegetarian way, more specific: ...


1

The only answer would be an aged Madeira or Port. I think either would be an excellent accompaniment to the foods are your choosing. Make sure they are fairly old. 10+ years old at least. The older the better... Best wine I ever had was a 1780s Madeira. Each bottle alone was over $10,000 and a glass at the restaurant was $1000. I know the restaurant owner ...


1

In my country drink made of mulled beer (usually with some spices) mixed with egg yolks beaten with sugar is quite popular. It is kind of thing you prepare when you are ill. As dessert it is considered "controversial") But you can try, some people really like it. Maybe I should add that it is rather hard to make, because you need right temperature of a ...


1

Please take a step back and remember that beer may include isinglass as fining as per this wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetarianism_and_beer. Going back to your question of dishes with beer that I tried, adding some beer to a crepe is good to make it taste richer. Crepe recipe is really easy. Mix the following in a blender: 1 glass of ...


1

A great recipe that use lots of beer: Vegetarian Pot Pie: 2 Bottles of Stout Carrots, celery, onion, garlic, oil or butter, potatos (pre-baked for 30min) salt and pepper to taste 2 pie shells 1 bag of white flower Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees Brown the vegetables in a skillet over medium heat. Add salt and sugar to get the caramelization going. Pour ...


1

Stone Brewery serves a smokey cheddar garlic soup at their tasting room bistro which is cooked with their Ruination IPA. The bitterness balances the salt and richness of the cheddar. I would definitely use IPA cautiously in cooking though, as the beer and alcohol will partially evaporate, causing the hop bitterness to concentrate noticably.


1

I've seen a lot of people commenting to cook with it , which is my advice , but I haven't seen someone speaking about crepes. I don't know if we only do this here (france) but I've always used beer to make crepes and it's realy great. I recently thought about using strong flavored beers (like dark ones) but didn't try it yet so if you try it soon a feedback ...


1

Another option is to make your own malt vinegar. You can just put a piece of cheesecloth over the top (with the cap removed), or you could add a little vinegar mother, like from the bottom of a "natural" bottle of vinegar, and it will turn it to vinegar for you.


1

You could use it to make steak and ale pie, this works particularly well with darker beers. Although you don't need much - about 1 cup / 220ml.


1

Let me start off by saying that I am an Italian-American, not a drop of Polish blood in me; so I'm not really in sync with Polish traditions. With that said, most of the recipes I'm seeing make it clear that you want to use a light beer, so obviously you're not gonna want to use a stout or porter here (though I'd be curious how it tastes; my friend swears ...


1

There appears to be no consensus. After scanning hundreds of Google results for polewka piwna (and polewka beer) using Google Translate to read pages in Polish, I found, as you did, most recipes refer generically to "beer (not dark)." I found several pages getting as specific as "Lager." I found a single blog post whose author used a blueberry-flavored ...


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