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13

In Dutch the names mean double and triple, they originated at the Belgian Westmalle abbey brewery where the double was a strong brown ale. Their tripel was the name they gave to their strongest beer, a blonde pale ale. These beers quickly became popular and were imitated worldwide as were their names. The convention now is as following, a dubbel is a strong ...


11

In a Half and Half (also known as a "Black and Tan" in certain locations), the primary factor will be the density of the two beers -- one beer must be of a lesser density than the other to stay afloat. Contrasting colors are used for visual effect; otherwise, how might you know one was floating? Common recipes involve floating the less dense Guinness over ...


10

If you follow the information trail through Wikipedia's page about Stout beer, you find that what was known as Stout became a strong, dark beer in the 1800s: In the 19th century, the beer gained its customary black colour through the use of black patent malt, and became stronger in flavour. You can see from the article about mash ingredients that black ...


7

I think it all depends on your personal preference. There are many different combinations out there such as the Black and Tan, but some companies have also started coming out with six packs that they intend for you to mix. Shock Top, for example, released a six pack that featured their Chocolate Wheat and their Belgium White. What I would do is think of a ...


6

Color tends to come primarily from the malt bill used (darker roasted malts lending darker color to a beer). In the case of Belgian beers, a "candi" sugar (derived from beets) may used as an additive, and different styles use different types of candi sugars. For dubbels in particular, the candi is a darker variety, made with a (more) substantial dose of ...


6

A half and half is a Guinness with Harp. This style of beer combination is accomplished by using a dense beer on the bottom followed by a beer of lesser density on the top (usually poured over a spoon to ensure that it doesn't sink through). Essentially it is usually an ale or lager underneath a stout. Some popular versions and combinations include The ...


5

You're right - is the high kilning temperatures used in the malt that give it a dark color. Note that not all Stouts use black patent malt - some use roasted unmalted barley, most famously, Guinness, which uses 18% roasted barley in the recipe (IIRC from my trip to the brewery.) If you look through a pint of Guinness, you'll see that it's not simply jet ...


3

Personally when creating a "Half and Half", Guiness is the only constant. The other beer is usually something only lighter in color. Wheat beers have an interesting flavor. IPA's have their bitterness cut when made into a Half and Half. Beyond that, I will sometimes select the beer so that the drink gets an awesome name: Black and Blue - Guiness w/ ...


3

Guinness isn't the only dark beer to layer with. Porters can be used to as a bottom layer to give you a dark-on-bottom drink. Check it all out at The Perfect Black and Tan.


3

Clear Absinthe Absinthe is made much in the same way that many gins are. You take neutral spirits, add botanicals (wormwood and anise), and re-distill. Anything that comes out of the still will be clear. Some absinthes at this point are finished, these will be called blanche (white) or sometime la bleue. The first absinthe available in Val-de-Travers (...


1

I am going to put my two bits into this question also. There are several existing colored absinthe on the market at the moment and a couple of ways to get various colored varieties. Artificial coloring is the most common. Absinthe may be found in the following colors: Green, Red (or Rose), Yellow, Brown, Clear and Blue. One way to get the desired colored ...


1

"Green" refers to the flavor of the beer. Under-matured beer can have a green apple aroma called Acetaldehyde. IT is reduced by yeast in the maturation phase.


1

I just asked for a half and half but this place didn't have Guiness so the bartender told me to try it with Murphy's and Harp instead. Total fail. The densities were too similar and one mixed into the other. Not awful flavor just not a Black and Tan.


1

It is more than color. You need the other beer to have a different density from Guinness, at least if you want it to stay separated for any length of time. And be careful which Guinness you use because there are a number of them out there with different "strengths". If the densities are too close, they'll mix together. A good starting point in selecting ...


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