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There are a couple of considerations, although this is far from a complete answer. First, a stronger (higher ABV) beer will tend to cellar better, as the alcohol can act to help prevent oxidization. Second, a beer with less emphasis on hops, and more on malt, yeast, or other characteristics, will be a better candidate, because the qualities that hops ...


12

There are a few types of beers which are (generally) good to age. Strong Beers: like such as barleywines, robust porters, and imperial stouts. It is benefical if a beer is 8-10 percent or stronger, since an elevated alcohol profile will typically become smoother, mellower and more agreeable. That does not mean lower alcohol percentage beers can not be aged, ...


5

In terms of commercial beers, it is hard to say. In general I find that aging tends to allow flavors to meld. If I brew beer and do a brief aging in oak (or add oak chips), the beer usually requires aging to achieve balance. This is most typical with something I sometimes make called ebulon (non-carbonated, fermented malt and elderberries, secondary ...


4

If Angove's are suggesting it may not be good, then its value as an investment is going to be low or zero, so if I were in your shoes I'd probably open it and try it. What's the worst that could happen? That said, Vintage Ports are typically supposed to last a long time. As it mentions on the label, "extended bottle maturation" where the port is bottled ...


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You'll probably do best keeping the room layout simple and as easily organized as possible. The main thing for the beer is to keep the temperature steady and relatively low (around 50F) and keep light out. Even with brown bottles there's still some UV penetration, which you want none of. So keep it dark when you're not in there and try to avoid florescent ...


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Personally I was quite taken with 60, 90, and 120 minute IPAs (thank you DFH) when shelved in cool and dark places for as much as a year. My guess is it would have been good for longer, but tasty beer and curiosity got the best of my experiment. I think Wayne in Yak deserves an up vote I can't yet do thanks to my noob status. Well researched and void of ...


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The person you talked to knows nothing about Port. Port is meant to age a very long time. Personally, I've had 50 year old ports that were excellent. Port is made by stopping fermentation with alcohol leaving behind some unfermented grape juice and about 20% alcohol. Because of the high alcohol, properly stored Port rarely has the problems that regular wine ...


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I would open at the next possible occasion. Twenty three years is usually enough time for the majority of vintage ports to mature fully. When the previous commenter says he’s had wonderful 50 year old ports, he surely means ones from the very highest quality : (1) Producers - I don’t know much about Angove’s but my quick research has revealed some older ...


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Typically it depends on the style. High ABV beers, such as imperial stouts and barley wines will typically age well while others lower in ABV will go rancid after 3-6 months. Obviously you're not going to want to cellar a Bud Light (it tastes rancid anyway before storing it). But even when speaking of higher quality beers, you're not going to want to cellar ...


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I would suggest reading "Vintage Beer: A Taster's Guide to Brews That Improve over Time" by Patrick Dawson. To summarize his findings on what types of beers improve with age they must contain at least one of these three characteristics: High ABV (8% or more) Sour Smoke It goes without saying that if a beer has two or more of these characteristics the odds ...


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