22

A modern canned beer should never taste like metal. If it does, you're probably drinking straight from the can, and while the folks at The Alchemist might recommend that, I can't say I share their view. Modern beer cans are lined with a water-based chemical that essentially ensures that your beer never touches metal. This in turn means that strictly ...


10

Guinness is "carbonated" with nitrogen, where most beers use carbon dioxide. This requires different hardware, bottling equipment, etc. If you've ever witnessed the appearance of a perfectly poured Guinness, and paid more than $5 USD for it, you'll understand why. It's partly about presentation. As one of the oldest beers on the market, it requires us to ...


10

There was a study about this which concluded that tapped beer can actually be better for different reasons (although taste is rather subjective). The reasons are: Beer on draught tends to have less air within the barrel compared to its bottled counterpart, meaning that the beer doesn't oxidise as quickly Beer within a barrel tends to remain cool for longer ...


7

The likely answer is somewhere between carbonation pressure and marketing. It's hard to find numbers for how much caps can handle vs corks but you should notice that most corked beers also come in bottles with very thick glass, this is because the beer inside is at a higher pressure than most other styles. Most beer styles will fall pretty close to 2.0 ...


7

Question one: how does bottled beer differ from draught beer? This varies from beer to beer, and should be handled on a beer-to-beer basis. Sometimes beer in the bottle is pasteurized, while the keg is not. Sometimes one or the other is filtered, while the other is not. The gas content can also differ, since this is adjustable in draught systems but not with ...


5

As you might expect, cans can impart a metallic flavor on some beer, but on the flip-side, they are much less prone to skunking. So if you're looking to store the beer for a while in a cool, dark place, I'd say bottle. However, if you plan on keeping it in a light place or outdoors, a can is probably your best bet.


4

A cap is not going to fly off a bottle unless it is not properly seated, no matter the carbonation. It is crimped onto the bottle. The bottle will first explode. It is also incorrect that a cork is necessary for higher carbonated beers. Many of the styles identified at higher carbonation volumes also come in capped bottles (particularly 375ml bottles). ...


4

Guinness, and a few other beers out there, are carbonated in part with nitrogen, which has much smaller bubbles. This creates a smoother mouthfeel; this is the "creaminess" that is often described. The use of nitrogen is probably uncommon for a few reasons. Firstly, there's the added production cost in the bottled or canned product: the widget. Secondly, ...


4

The bottle cap has the same purpose as a wire cage-- to ensure that the cork doesn't pop itself under the bottle's interior pressure.


4

Plastic food packaging in general is usually lined with Bisphenol A (aka. BPA), as are some canned goods, which is a rather controversial chemical. It's been linked to cancer, sexual dysfunction, and other ailments. So I try to avoid it whenever possible and buy my food in glass jars. I can only imagine how much BPA is dissolved into alcoholic beverages ...


4

They are shooting for a bottle conditioned beer which means the beer ferments a little bit in the bottle, trapping the co2 and carbonating the beer "naturally". I doubt they are putting sugar directly in the bottle, but probably putting the sugar in the beer and then putting it in the bottle. This way the sugar dissolves more evenly and gives a more ...


3

Let's start with what are Nomex corks and what are natural corks. Nomex is a registered trademark for flame-resistant meta-aramid material developed in the early 1960s by DuPont and first marketed in 1967. Nomex and related aramid polymers are related to nylon, but have aromatic backbones, and hence are more rigid and more durable. Nomex is the ...


3

Provided all the bottling equipment was properly sanitised (which you'd hope was the case for commercial beer), you shouldn't notice any impact on the taste of the beer. That said, plastic bottles do not provide as good a seal as a crown sealed glass bottle. If you store the beer for long enough (say six months to a year), a plastic bottle will have lost ...


3

I do not think that the type of cork is important. The important thing is that the cork used seals of the bottle so that no wild yeasts or bacteria are able to enter the bottle. Traditionally cork and flip-top caps have been used for beers required for preservation, however any seal would do. In my opinion it's more about tradition than functionality. ...


2

I'd strongly dissuade anyone from ever drinking anything from an aluminum can, not just beer. As mentioned by LessPop_MoreFizz, beer cans are lined with a compound that attempts to prevent contact with the aluminum... That chemical, however, is Bisphenol A which is a potentially very dangerous chemical compound for your body when ingested... CDC still ...


2

The can/bottle is required to have country of origin listed on it. Most US Guinness Extra Stout is brewed in either Toronto or New Brunswick, depending on the contract brewer. All of the Guinness Draught is brewed in their historic brewery in Dublin. However, debate abounds about whether the US recipe is different.


1

Fermantation and CO2 Long story short, yeast consumes sugar and produces alcohol and CO2. During primary fermentation all the CO2 is released into the air (unless you ferment under pressure which I assume you don't). After fermentation your beer has alcohol but is flat. You need to introduce CO2 to your product somehow. Since CO2 is a product of ...


1

I think they would not make a good candidate for beer or wine bottles if you want to subject them to moisture or cold Static Cling Labels Static Clings are usually made of a flexible vinyl or plastic that has a very smooth coat and will stick to clean glass surfaces utilizing the moisture in the air and on the glass to adhere to the surface. In cold ...


1

If the aerator top is still working, meaning that no air has gotten to the wine, you should still be able to bottle it. The best way to know is to taste it. If it tastes right, you should be fine.


1

You have to read the small print. In the UK there is a Japanese beer called Asahi and on the front it has Japanese kanji writing and "IMPORTED" in big letters. But reading the small print on the side it says it is brewed in the Czech republic.


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