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45

Yes. Taste is really smell, and different glasses can capture aromas differently. Furthermore, different aromas may be more or less present dependent upon temperature, and a glass may be crafted to be held a particular way (gathering more or less heat from your hand). The same is true for wine glasses. That said, how much of a difference it makes to you ...


11

The fact that both Humulus lupulus (hops) and Cannabis sativa (marijuana) have similar organoleptic properties (taste and smell) could indicate a common ancestry--but it isn't proof. Lots of plants make similar aroma molecules, known as terpenes and terpenoid compounds, including lemons (which make limonene), lavender (linalool) and conifers (pinene) -- but ...


10

Not have any experiense on Beer testing but here are few tips from beer.about.com Do not taste new beers with food or soon after eating. The lingering flavors from food can greatly affect your impression of the brew. Cleanse your palate with water. Crackers or cheese are fine but you should remember that even these foods can affect the apparent flavors of ...


7

I would like to point out that taste is not the only important criterion when drinking beer. What you want is a good experience, and the taste is only a part (albeit a major part) of that. Having different glasses for different types of beers can affect your drinking experience in a number of different ways. First off, having an unusual or unique glass can ...


7

The 'dank' scent you're experiencing is the smell of Hops - among the closest botanical neighbors to the Marijuana plant and a key ingredient of beer. The two plants both look and smell nearly identical. Specifically, the dank, resiny scent you pick up from a very hoppy brew is the smell of so-called "Alpha Acids" - which are chemically a part of the same ...


6

I would avoid bread, since that contains quite a bit of salt and yeast - so if you taste yeast in the next beer you don't know if it's from the beer or from bread still stuck in your teeth. The food should be neutral, preferably unsalted and consumed with water. Unsalted crackers are probably as close to ideal here. While cheese can work, I wouldn't say it ...


3

Sounds like you have a hydrogen sulfide problem. There is a three steps I follow when I get this problem. Give it time. Many times it will dissipate on it's own, especially with racking and introducing oxygen. But this doesn't always work. Add some potassium metabisulfates (campden tablets). This sometimes will drive out the problem making the sulfides ...


3

As a Belgian I am always told by bartenders and brewers that for special (heavy) Belgian beers a Tulip glass is a good choice, except for Belgian Lambics (nl:Lambieken) for which one should use a flute glass. These glasses are sometimes scratched at the bottom to better accommodate the bubbling (for example: Duvel Glasses)


2

Studies have shown a correlation between a foods presentation and the perceived goodness of the taste. So even excepting the usual reasons for matching a beer style to a glass style (head retention, aroma dispersal, etc.), presenting a beer in a good looking vessel will enhance its taste. 1: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007. DOI:10.1001/archpedi.161.8.792 2: ...


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